Archives for April 2015

Village Earth Affiliate “Titukuke RCDA” Helping Youth to Start Peanut Farms in Zambia

4 Beneficiary Youths cultivating peanuts

REPORT ON 40 TITUKUKE YOUTHS TO BECOME PEANUT FARMERS

The organization was privileged to have received funding from Global Giving meant to help 40 youths start an out grower scheme for production of peanuts in Petauke district in Eastern Province in Zambia, Southern Africa.

The youths were given certified seed and planted the high oil yielding MGV4 Peanut variety in the month of December, 2015. The 40 youths were divided into 8 groups so that they find it easy to cultivate the crop that is burdensome especially when weeding. The progress of their crop was monitored by the Field Extension officer. The crop is expected to be ready for harvesting in the month of

May, 2016. Major challenges so far are that the rain pattern was not too good because it came in December instead of October thereby meaning that the amount of rain was enough. However, being that the variety used was early maturing; the peanuts are expected to yield above average. The other challenge was the impassable roads that hindered the Field Officer to utilize the motorbike all the way to beneficiaries’ fields. He had to leave the motorbike half way and walk.

The organization is very thankful to all the donors whose donation has made this dream come true. The youths are very thankful too for the support and wish that yet many youths can be assisted to join them

Village Earth Global Affiliate “Maloca” to bring Kamayura Chief to UN Permanent Forum

KThank  you to everyone who donated to Village Earth Affiliate “Maloca” so they could bring – for the first time – the Kamayura cacique (chief) Kotok from Xingu Indigenous Park in Brazil to New York. The chief will attend the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues where he will bring important messages from Xingu, will exchange experiences with other leaders and will learn first-hand about mechanisms and tools Indigenous Peoples have to defend their human rights, traditional knowledge and their territories. He will forge alliances with foundations and universities in the hope this will open doors for the Kamayura to receive much needed support .The cacique will raise awareness on the incredibly well preserved Kamayura culture and territory (which they want to keep intact for as long as they can, a most difficult job due to aggressive penetration of outside economic interest and western cultural elements).

Maloca is also honored to host a an event with the this distinguished guest April 23, 2015 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm At the National Museum of the American Indian One Bowling Green New York, NY 10004. If you are interested in attending you can purchase tickets online here.

The Kamayura are Indigenous Peoples that live in Xingu Indigenous Park, Mato Grosso state of Brazil. The region is the transition zone between the Brazilian Amazon rainforest and the savannah, an area particularly rich in biodiversity, also known for its high deforestation rates due to intense cattle ranching and soy cultivation. In 2009, the deforestation rate around the Park was 47% as per ISA (Instituto Socio Ambiental).

Xingu Indigenous Park is home to 14 different ethnicities, counting roughly 5,000 people. Chief Kotok Kamayura is the cacique of the main Kamayura village, Ipavu, where about 350 people live. The chief, having great knowledge of what is happening inside Xingu Indigenous Park, will speak about common issues to all inhabitants of the Park, showing how life in their remote villages is affected by human activities outside the Park. As cacique, he is responsible for his community and he must have a vision for their future. With all the aggressive outside influences penetrating village life, he is concerned about the future of their children and grandchildren, with their cultural survival and the integrity of their territory. The Kamayura are dependent on nature and its cycles. Their livelihoods are based on fishing and cultivating manioc. They use medicinal plants from the forest to keep a strong body and cure illnesses. The fish, manioc crops, water supply, and even medicinal plants are already affected by changes in weather patterns.  Chief Kotok will be presenting at the 14th Session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues where he will discuss these crucial issues and will forge alliances with other Indigenous leaders. As part of his first trip to New York City, he will be speaking at the National Museum of the American Indian.  Attendants will be able to meet Chief Kotok and his son Aira personally and glimpse into their captivating world. Together we will discuss pressing issues like climate change, cultural survival, the environment and possible solutions.

The Kaweshkar Inhabiting Tierra del Fuego, Chile.  The land which Ferdinad Magellan named Land of Smoke, Land of Fire is one of the most inhospitable places on the continent, where survival is hard.  With never-ending winds, cold descending to below zero , snow and the fury of the sea where throughout their lives, as lonely as the landscape, small groups of these nomads wandered searching for food and survival. Denominated as nomads, hunters and gatherers these avid canoers made their habitat in the Patagonian canals where to the present day the survivors remain.  The Kaweshkar Indigenous language remains after over 13 centuries.  During the decades of the 30’s they were abruptly hit by civilization and cultural change. Developing illnesses caused by the sudden forced change from their customary otter ski clothing to regular clothes that were not appropriate to endure the below zero temperatures causing them illness and death.  Otter skins were very much in demand in those days and hunters would kill the Kaweshkar to take the skins from their bodies.  Alcoholism was also a cause of death. .  In 2009 UNESCO declared the remaining Kaweshkar survivors as Human Living Treasures of Humanity.  Carlos Edén Maidel (Peteyem) is one of the last 9 remaining Kaweshkar.  The survivors are all pure blood Kaweshkar, all Elders (5 men and 4 women).  What will become of the last 9 remaining survivors?  Times passes and we just see them die off one by one until there will be no more – an entire Indigenous Nation extict forever.  Carlos will also attend the 14th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues to inform on current state of his nation and to seek support to produce and publish memories of his Nation.

Teca Woasniye Wicoti (Youth Healing Camp) on The Pine Ridge Reservation a Success!

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Porcupine, SD- On a cold February morning three grassroots organizations met on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to discuss the five completed suicides and how they could intervene; participating in this meeting were Mila Yatan Pika Pte Oyate Okolakiciye (Knife Chief Buffalo Nation Society), Tasunke Wakan Okolakiciye (Medicine Horse Society) and Oaye Luta Okolakiciye (Red Journey Society). Through the course of this meeting it quickly became apparent that with each program there had an intense desire and need to help the youth and their families suffering from the impact of this epidemic.

Tiospaye Sakowin Wounspe na Woapiye O’Tipi (Seven Extended Families Education and Healing Center) was born and a strategic plan developed to continue to provide healing services to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. These organizations are the first of seven families to align in this effort to promote Lakota Cultural Healing and Education and they were quickly joined by Sung Nagi Okolakiciye (Spirit Horse Society) from Manderson, SD. Since the centers inception on February 15, there have been four additional completed suicides bringing the total to nine completed suicides.

First thing on the agenda? Provide a culturally relevant way for individuals in the helping field to assist and address the suicide issue on the Pine Ridge Indian reservation. On March 26 and 27th Tiospaye Sakowin hosted “Lakota Mental Health First Aid Training” facilitated by Richard and Ethleen (Iron Cloud) Two Dogs. This training provided the participants with the opportunity to understand the spiritual growth of individuals from their time of birth until their passing and what happens when this natural growth is interrupted through unnatural sources such as abuse (of all kinds), violence, accidents and suicidal ideation and completion.

The presenters, board members of the collaborating societies, shared their insight and knowledge into the cultural perspective on indigenous healing. To a room of thirty plus participants, Mr. and Mrs. Two Dogs shared their knowledge through integrating the Lakota Customary, Natural, and Spiritual laws within the educational process, and to revitalize and implement the Lakota interventions through education and practice.

Participants in the training ranged from youth to elderly; from as far away as Standing Rock Indian Reservation and as close as Porcupine and Manderson. A surprise visit from Oglala Lakota Nation Tribal President John Steele highlighted the day’s events when he acknowledged the work being completed within the center and thanked all the participants in their vested interest in the epidemic.

Collectively this program and its partnering societies provide a foundation of 20 plus years working with Lakota elders and traditional healers to revitalize and strengthen the Lakota life ways and laws through education, healing and collaboration. Their primary programmatic focus is to empower the Lakota Tiwahe (families) in reclaiming their Lakota identity. Each of these organizations provides a unique attribute that provides healing and empowerment services to the Lakota Oyate. With room to grow, Tiospaye Sakowin will partner with seven organizations with like minds, missions and philosophy to strengthen and expand the impact of indigenous services.

During the Easter holiday weekend this Lakota community-based organization, hosted a healing opportunity for our youth through a Teca Woasniye Wicoti (Youth Healing Camp) on April 2-6, 2015. Through this camp, learning, recreational and healing activities were offered to twenty six participating youth. Through this healing opportunity, as a way to give life to the values, gifts and teachings provided by Tunkasila (Grandfather/Creator) for the healing of the youth that were incorporated into the facilitation of programming. They included: Wacante Ognaka—to have a warm, compassionate environment for youth; Woapiye –traditional healing for their spiritual wounds from the trauma, grief or loss; Wopakinte—spiritual purification from the negative residue left by any trauma; Woyuskin—to provide a happy, fun and accepting environment; Lakol Caswicatun Pi – to provide an opportunity for those youth who do not have a spirit name to receive one as a way to reinforce their Lakota cultural identity; Wicozani—to provide an opportunity for wellness screenings and Wowasake—to provide an opportunity to achieve resiliency.

In recent years these collaborating organizations worked with community leaders, families and Lakota Oyate to provide healing opportunities to over sixty youth per annum in a series of youth camps based on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. These sixty youth reflect those young people who have addressed their unresolved trauma and emotional issues during these camps, then continue throughout life better equipped to address other issues. With financial support from local, state and Tribal organizations these camps are uniquely designed to address specific needs of the age and gender of the participating youth.

At conception, Teca Woasniye Wicoti was designed to service 24 Native American youth (12 males and 12 females) ages 12-17, who have experienced trauma, loss and/ or grief. Registration for the camp was closed on March 27th with 26 females and 13 males registered with continuing requests from the community for exceptions to the deadline so that more youth may attend; 26 youth completed the program.  Ethleen Iron Cloud-Two Dogs, Camp Lead on this project stated, “All registrations will be accepted, no one will be turned away.” She continues to say, “As adult relatives, we seek to instill in our youth the Lakota belief that every individual has a purpose on earth and that resiliency to confront life’s challenges can be achieved.”

Teca Woasniye Wicoti was set up to mirror a Tiospaye (extended family) governing which allows for all to work together. The youth of the camp engaged and participated in gender appropriate teachings and ceremonies. Each of the activities and ceremonies engaged the youth at different levels and allow them to work together in their healing experience, thus creating a small community approach. “There are so many people who came together to make this happen for our youth,” Cindy Giago, volunteer Program Manager for Tiospaye Sakowin states, “so many that it would be hard to name each person in one setting but there are those that go above and beyond to make things like this happen; like my brother and sister-in-law, my nephews, nieces and my daughter-in-laws that never back down from a good battle.”  Mrs. Giago goes on to state that the Tunkasila and the Unci (the ancestors) provide the most important and significant guidance through prayer and the Societies are blessed with the earthly spiritual guidance of her Tiblo (older brother) Richard Two Dogs, a Lakota Medicine Man.

Youth participant qualifications included being members of or have tribal ties to the Dakota, Lakota and Nakota Sioux nations as the camp’s foundation is based on Lakota Life Ways, culture and most importantly spirituality. Participants are between the ages of 10-17 years of age who would benefit from attending and receiving interventions designed to prevent progression of symptoms of depression, which could eventually lead to suicidal ideations.   In the end the camp effort is hosted over 75 participants who include the youth, their families, volunteers, mentors, spiritual leaders and security. Many local programs, schools and organizations supported the youth at the camp, as well as many individual donors nation-wide. Donations included clothing, food, supplies as well as monetary donations.

Tiospaye Sakowin Education and Healing Center will be hosting additional Camps this summer which include the Teca Woasniye Wicoti (Youth Healing Camp) that happened in April, Wakanyeja Wicoti (Children’s Camp) in July, Wikoskalaka Yuwita Pi (Lakota Gathering of Young Women) in August and the Lakota Koskalaka Wica Yuwita Pi (Lakota Young Men’s Gathering) times two in June and November 2015. As this organization depends greatly on charitable donations from well-meaning companies here in the United States; they ask you to please consider donating to their organization as you will be eligible for a charitable contribution for donating to a registered 501c3 organization. Please visit www.villageearth.org for more information or email: [email protected] The center invites you to be one of their partners in the successful implementation of these programs that will address the needs of the Pine Ridge Indian reservation in a much more in a culturally appropriate, positive and healing perspective.

Learn About Utah Tar Sands Resistance – April 22nd at the Fort Collins Old Town Library.

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Join Village Earth and 350 Ft. Collins, a local affiliate of 350.org, April 22 at the Old Town Library at 6:30 PM for a screening of “Last Rush for the Wild West” a documentary about the tar sands mine currently under construction on the Tavaputs Plateau in Utah, part of it is on Uintah Ute tribal land, so there are several indigenous groups involved opposing the mine. In June 2014, the EPA told U.S. Oil Sands that it needed additional permitting to proceed because its mine sits on traditional Uintah and Ouray Ute tribal land. They continued operations without the permitting.

Melanie Martin, who organizes with Peaceful Uprising and Utah Tar Sands Resistance, we be speaking and answering questions following the screening. Last year she spent her summer and fall on the East Tavaputs Plateau working to halt the first potential fuel-producing tar sands mine in the U.S. She writes on climate justice issues for a range of publications such as Yes!, Waging Nonviolence, and Truthout, creates short film pieces, and makes a pretty badass chipmunk mask.