Archives for September 2015

Village Earth Sponsors Partnership Between Ngozi University and Colorado State University.

Submitted by Dr. Apollinaire Bangayimbaga, Rector Ngozi Univeristy & William Timpson, Professor CSU.

“Amahoro” is the Kirundi word for peace. After forty years of genocide and civil war during which a large percentage of its educated citizens were targeted, exiled or killed, impoverished Burundi is now ripe to model a transformative development approach while nurturing a new generation of leaders. Founded in 1999 with a commitment to reconciliation, its University of Ngozi (UNG) is uniquely situated to be a laboratory for peace-building and sustainable development.

As a major research university, Colorado State University (CSU) has historical strengths in science, engineering, technology and mathematics (STEM education), emerging depth in the social sciences and cross cultural communication, peace education and reconciliation studies. As a land grant university, CSU also has a successful track record in extending expertise to the field, through Extension, and overseas through a wide range of public/private/NGO partnerships. Colorado State University is well positioned to serve as a partner with the University of Ngozi to mobilize resources, trial new ideas, and disseminate success stories.

Those committed to the Amahoro Project believe that development must wed with educational innovation to ready new leaders and professionals to heal and foster civil society as basic infrastructure needs are addressed. In early 2012, UNG, a co-ed, multi-faith institution with Hutu, Tutsi, and Twa students, signed an International Memorandum of Understanding (IMOU) with CSU’s School of Global Environmental Sustainability (SoGES) to pursue sustainable peace and development. CSU’s School of Education can draw on its doctoral specialization in Teaching and Learning to help build bridges between schools and universities in different regions of the world.

We need funding to support all this.

  • Build new curricula that emphasizes appropriate technology and participatory case- and project-based learning, which link communities with innovations that address basic needs of local communities.
  • Infuse UNG’s existing undergraduate disciplines—health, agriculture, communications, law, business, computer sciences—with new curricula that emphasizes content mastery and peace-building, i.e., the civic skills of effective intercultural and cross-cultural communication, consensus-building, negotiation, cooperation, conflict mitigation, critical and creative thinking.
  • With some sports equipment build on what we know about cooperative learning to create multi-tribal teams and showcase the benefits of friendly competition for unlearning hatred and prejudice.
  • With the involvement of the military in the U.S. and Burundi we could explore ways of utilizing security forces (active duty and demobilized personnel) to lead toward reconciliation.
  • With the involvement of Rotary International and their commitment to Peace and Conflict Resolution, the business community can be engaged as well.
  • Promoting community health through innovative education and social work.
  • When possible, utilize Fulbright Senior Specialist awards to support this project.

In all of these endeavors, we propose to use locally generated and regionally applicable case- and project-based learning to transform surface or memorized learning. Liberatory education is needed to aid the shift toward long-term stability and prosperity. What proves viable in Burundi, East Africa and the developing world could also have benefits for communities in the industrialized world that struggle with conflict, violence, polarization, and the costs of security. Over the course of this project, UNG will be established as a viable on-going site and dissemination center for research and development in sustainable peace and development. Leaders from around the world—in higher education, NGOs, government, business—with content expertise and peace and reconciliation experience would be invited to partner with UNG. (See Timpson, W., E. Ndura, and A. Bangayimbaga (2015) Conflict, reconciliation, and peace education: Moving Burundi toward a sustainable future. New York, NY: Routledge).

Through the fire of violence, Burundians are forging a

  • RECOVERY and REBIRTH of spirit;
  • RECONCILIATION of wounds, differences, rivalries, prejudices, and hatreds;
  • RESOLVE to understand the truth of the past, fix the present, and prepare for a better future; and
  • RESILIENCE to rebuild an impoverished, post-colonial nation and its diverse communities.

Please consider supporting the Amahoro Project. In Burundi, contact Dr. Apollinaire Bangayimbaga. In the U.S., contact Dr. William Timpson. Whatever the level of your support, together we can help build sustainable peace and development. Contributions for scholarships at the University of Ngozi should be made out to Amahoro: Village Earth. Other contributions should be made out to Amohoro: CSU Foundation.

New Village Earth/CSU Course – Humanitarian Assistance Toolbox: Resources for Best Practices

Due to the positive response from our inaugural Introduction to Humanitarian Assistance online course, Village Earth is pleased to announce our second course in the Humanitarian Assistance specialization Humanitarian Assistance Toolbox.*  This course is being offered in collaboration with EmBOLDEN Alliances and is a part of Village Earth’s and Colorado State University Online’s Sustainable Community Development Certificate Program. Now enrolling through November 1, 2015.

Given the basic knowledge and understanding of Humanitarian Assistance, this course provides participants the opportunity to explore various toolkits and standards used throughout Humanitarian Assistance with both breadth and depth.

Participants will gain an understanding for standard resources and guidelines that have been created to ensure and maintain human dignity, quality of life, impactful and sustainable service delivery, and sustainability of response through recovery and resiliency.

This course will provide participants an introduction to tools necessary to engage in humanitarian assistance more effectively. By providing participants the opportunity to examine and understand international standards and guidelines, participants will gain an improved ability to deliver impactful and coordinated action that benefits individuals and communities.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify critical international guidelines used in Humanitarian Assistance.
  • Explain the creation of SPHERE, its significance and utility.
  • Discuss inter-sectoral collaboration in relation to recent emergency contexts.
  • Recognize key tools for needs assessments.
  • Relate international standards to monitoring and evaluation of programming.
  • Describe mainstreaming for vulnerable populations in emergency contexts.

This course will be taught by Neena Jain MD MSTPH DTM&H, who for over twenty years has thrived in international Humanitarian Assistance and Global Health as Program Manager, Country Medical Director, Health Sector Lead, and Technical Advisor with many international nongovernmental organizations throughout Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean. These agencies have included Medecins Sans Frontieres/Doctors Without Borders, International Medical Corps, Australian Aid International, and Save The Children, among others. She is the current Executive Director of emBOLDen Alliances. Dr. Jain was Board-certified in Emergency Medicine in 2001 and practiced as an Attending Physician at Swedish Medical Center and Denver Health Medical Center Emergency Departments. She developed programmatic structure and taught core content using innovative techniques as Director and Deputy Director for the Program in Humanitarian Assistance and Adjunct Faculty for the Global Health Affairs Program at the University of Denver Korbel School of International Studies.

*While it may be helpful to have some prior knowledge in the field of humanitarian assistance, it is not required to have taken any other course in this series before taking Humanitarian Assistance Toolbox.

30% Match on Donations to VE Affiliates in Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Pine Ridge, Burundi, and The Gambia

On Wednesday September 16th, starting at 9am EDT (7:00am MST), GlobalGiving.org will be matching online donations at 30% until the $70,000 in matching funds runs out. Don’t miss this opportunity to supersize your donations to eligible Village Earth Global Affiliates.

Eligible projects are listed below with links to their donation pages on Globalgiving.org.

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VE Affiliate Titukuke Rural Community Dev. Assoc. Empowers Youth Peanut Farmers

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Youth sorting peanuts for oil production.

Submitted by: Richard Mbachundu, Titukuke RCDA

We at Titukuke RCDA were recently visited by The President of The United States African Development Foundation (USADF) who was on a site visit to verify and motivate the peanut  and vegetable Oil production project that they funded at a cost of $100,000. The youths supported during the Village Earth/Global Giving campaign contributed to the project by increasing the tonnage of stock and the number of vulnerable people living improved lives through cash sales of peanuts as well as improved healthy due to the rich peanut vegetable oil they are consuming. The oil product has undergone preliminary inspection with the Zambia Bureau of Standards so that we get a permit to supply. The organization further wants to inform  our supporters and those reading the Village Earth newsletter that our profile competed favorably in the area of HIV and AIDS  awareness for road construction work sites in our district. A campaign team was formed from among the membership and the youths have formed  music and theatre groups that are supporting the awareness works.

Below are some pictures from these projects:

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Titukuke peanut project visited by The USADF President front row second from left. Photo taken At the oil plant together with board, management and entourage

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Titukuke facilitator teaching behavioral change positive life styles to construction workers at one of their sites. Awareness will take 18 months with effect from July,2015

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The factory Manager displaying the oil products for sales promotion at the plant

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Part of the packed vegetable oil stocked in readiness for sales

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Titukuke theatre group performing during a youth gathering at Petauke Boarding School

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The regional inspector from ZABS after formal compliance check- ups in the oil plant and brought the test results of the product

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The label for the oil product-‘Nshawa’ means peanuts

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Titukuke music group performing HIV awareness and prevention songs

Tell the President of Peru that his government needs to honor the rights of indigenous people.

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Right now indigenous communities are being denied their right to free prior and informed consent. The Peruvian government recently announced that it is opening up Block 192 for oil and gas exploration without proper safeguards that would stop the regular spills that occur in the region. It was only three years ago that the Peruvian government declared an environmental state of emergency in the region after the Ministry of Health “found high levels of barium, lead, chrome and petroleum-related compounds at different points in the Pastaza valley.” Today, indigenous communities and their leaders in the region are being denied their legal right to free, prior and informed consent on all infrastructure, energy and mining projects that affect their lives, territories and rights. We need you to join Village Earth and our partner in Colombia “Jenzera” now to demand that Peruvian President Ollanta Humala Tasso comply with the law that he signed into legislation in 2011, guaranteeing that indigenous people will have a say in further development.

View and sign petition below.

[emailpetition id=”2″]