Archives for October 2016

Event: Linking Conservation and Sustainable Livelihoods in High Biodiversity-Poverty Hotspots | Oct. 27th, Fort Collins, Co.

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Join us October 27th from 5pm – 6:30 at Avogadros Number, 605 S. Mason Street in Fort Collins, Colorado where Village Earth Executive Director will serve on a panel hosted by Trees, Water, & People to discuss linking conservation and sustainable livelihoods in high biodiversity-poverty hotspots

 

Moderator:

Gemara Gifford, Development Director at Trees, Water, & People

Gemara Gifford is Trees, Water & People’s Director of Development. Gem raises funds and develops projects for TWP’s International and National programs with an emphasis on biodiversity conservation and sustainable livelihoods. Her graduate research in the Highlands of Guatemala aimed to identify practices that optimize bird conservation and the ability of local communities to meet their nutritional and economic needs, and she is now beginning to replicate this model within TWP’s projects in Central Honduras. Gem brings to TWP her extensive background in wildlife conservation, community-based development, and a commitment to working with marginalized communities, critters, and habitats in        the US and Latin America. She completed her M.S. in Natural Resources at Cornell University as a Gates Millennium Scholar, and her B.S. in Zoology at Colorado State University as a Distinguished First Generation Student Scholar.


Panelists:

Sebastian Africano, International Director at Trees, Water & People

Sebastian Africano is the International Director at Trees, Water & People (TWP), which he first joined in 2005 as a Marketing Intern for TWP’s clean cookstove program in Honduras. He joined TWP full-time in 2009 and currently manages all macro aspects of our International Programs, including business development, partnerships and program strategy.  He has a BS in International Business and Marketing from Penn State University, and is looking forward to receiving his MBA from Colorado State University (CSU) in May 2017.  Additionally he supports several CSU programs in the College of Business (Executive Education and Entrepreneurship) and the Warner College of Natural Resources (Center for Collaborative Conservation, CLTL Master’s Program).  


Robin Reid: Director at the Center for Collaborative Conservation

Robin Reid is the Director of the Center for Collaborative Conservation at Colorado State University.  As Director, she oversees all the CCC’s programs and staff. She is also a Professor in the Dept. of Ecosystem Science and Sustainability and Senior Research Scientist in the Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory at CSU. As faculty, she teaches courses in collaborative conservation and sustainability, and helps discover new ways to implement collaborative research-for-action for people and the     environment in the drylands of East Africa, Asia and North America. 


David Bartecchi: Executive Director, Village Earth

David Bartecchi is the Executive Director of Village Earth, a Fort Collins-based not-for-profit organization that provides training and consulting to the aid and relief community including an online Certificate Program in Sustainable Community Development through CSU Online. Village Earth also manages a Global Affiliate program that provides organizational support to 20 grassroots and intermediary organizations in 14 different countries. David has spent the past 18 years working primarily with Native American communities to reclaim their lands from the Bureau of Indian Affairs Range Unit Leasing Program and with indigenous communities in Peru and Ecuador.


Marcela Velasco, Associate Professor, Colorado State University – Political Science

Marcela is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Colorado State University. Her areas of specialization include Latin American Politics, social movements, environmental politics, and development politics. Her research is on Colombian indigenous and Afro-Colombian organizations and how they shape local politics.


Brett Bruyere, Director, Conservation Learning Through Leadership Graduate Program

Brett’s teaching and research addresses environmental communication and community-based conservation, often in a context of developing world settings. He also serves as the Director of the department’s Conservation Leadership through Learning graduate program, and is the founder of Samburu Youth Education Fund, a nonprofit dedicated to educational access in the northern region of Kenya.


Rina Hauptfeld, PhD Candidate, Colorado State University

Rina Hauptfeld is a current doctoral student in the GDPE and HDNR department. As a CCC Fellow her project is focused on partnering with the Coastal Conservation and Education Foundation (CCEF) and the Filipino Citizen Science Network to take advantage of citizen science momentum while giving practitioners tools to sustain work towards community based conservation.

Better Decision-making Through Community Mapping in Mongolia | October 26, 12pm. CSU Morgan Library

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Village Earth and the Center for Collaborative Conservation are hosting a very special presentation on community-based mapping and GIS by  Enkhtungalag Chuluunbaatar from the Ger Communty Mapping Center based-in Ulaanbaatar Mongolia. This presentation will take place from 11:30am to 1pm, October 26th at the Morgan Library Event Hall on the campus of Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado.

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Enkhtungalag Chuluunbaatar

Abstract: Ulaanbaatar, capital city of Mongolia is home to almost half of the country’s population, in which more than 60% live in the ger area. Centralized administrative power, rapid urbanization, economic and political instability calls for a stronger civil society with a vision for long-term, sustainable, and inclusive development. Ger Community Mapping Center sees community mapping as one of the tools to inform and empower local communities and the general public to promote participatory decision-making. Community mapping draws on the implicit knowledge within local communities on everyday issues with long-term consequences.

This presentation will take place from 11:30am to 1pm, October 26th at the Morgan Library on the campus of Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado.

Co-sponsored by Village Earth and

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Tourism “business as usual” is Broken: Reflections on the Global Tourism Industry

ethical issues with tourism

By Cynthia Ord, Tourism and Development Online Course Instructor

Tues Nov 8 is an important date for Americans – the federal election will determine our new president. Meanwhile, across the pond in London, it’s also a big day for the global tourism community. Nov 8 will mark the 10th annual World Responsible Tourism Day, celebrated as part of World Travel Market (WTM), one of the biggest annual trade shows of the industry.

At face value, the WTM trade show looks a lot like “business as usual”. In a huge conference center, reps from big-name travel brands network with public tourism boards and deep-pocketed destination marketing organizations (DMOs, in travel-speak). Execs strike deals. Thought leaders deliver keynotes. PR agents pitch puff pieces to the travel media elite. Costumed “Mayans” from the Guatemala booth and “Carnival” dancers from the Brazil booth parade around the corporate suits in a charade of authenticity.

But tourism “business as usual” is broken.

Only a fraction of tourism dollars reach the destinations themselves. The quality of service jobs created for locals is low. Overcrowding degrades the travel experience. Tension flares up between hosts and visitors. Biodiversity suffers. Climate change alters destinations. These are just few of the challenges we face as the runaway global travel industry speeds up to 2 billion annual tourists spending $2 trillion yearly by 2030.¹

Take a deeper look at the WTM and, fortunately, you’ll also find a group that faces these challenges head-on. They organize the Responsible Tourism Day events. I’ll be spending Nov 8 at the WTM learning and celebrating on that bright side of the trade show. Here are a few highlights from the World Responsible Tourism Day schedule that I’m looking forward to:

Responsible Tourism Awards
Out of 13 finalists, five awards will be granted for the following categories:
Best accommodation for responsible employment
Best contribution to wildlife conservation
Best innovation by a tour operator
Best for poverty reduction and inclusion
Best responsible tourism campaign
An overall winner will also be announced.

I’ve spent countless consulting hours this past year researching all the different responsible tourism awards schemes out there, and the WTM award is arguably the most illustrious and competitive. This is one election whose candidates I can really get excited about. Sure to be a glamorous affair!

Keynote Speaker Doug Lansky
Doug Lansky, travel writer, tourism industry advisor, and author of the thought-provoking new visual book TRAVEL: The Guide, takes us on a journey to find the Holy Grail of tourism: sustainable, profitable, and authentic travel.

Captivity, Wildlife and Tourism
Over the last year increasing concern has been expressed about the use of wildlife in tourism with campaigns focused on elephants, lions and orcas. Three panelists will consider these campaigns and reflect on how successful they have been.

This topic is near to my heart, as I spent several months in Thailand this past year examining the thorny issue of elephants in tourism. I compiled a guidebook on the subject called Elephants in Asia, Ethically: Humane Experiences with Asia’s Sacred Animal. Several of my collaborators on the book will be presenting at this discussion panel.

Other panel discussions on the Responsible Tourism agenda include:

  • Responsibility and resilience: how can tourism be more resilient?
  • Human rights in tourism
  • Responsible “better” volunteering
  • Disintermediation and destination management
  • Communicating responsible tourism: advocacy and marketing
  • Enhancing the tourist experience in Africa
  • Climate change and tourism

These are the issues that face local communities in the destinations that, as travelers, we often either love to death or fail to consider. It will be a busy few days for me at the WTM, and I’ll be thrilled to pass on my new knowledge and insights as instructor of the course Tourism and Development. Now enrolling through November 1.