Archives for May 2017

June Courses in the Online Certificate Program in Sustainable Community Development

PARTICIPATORY WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Course Tuition: $390
Continuing Education Units (CEUs): 2
Duration: 5 weeks

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Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
June 9 – July 14, 2017 June 5, 2017 Open

Course Description

Millions in both urban and rural communities worldwide are becoming vulnerable to water scarcity, social exclusion from access to water, polluted water sources and water-borne diseases. Overpopulation, falling groundwater tables, the mismanagement of water sources, pollution and over-extraction all threaten to exacerbate the already severe decline in available water resources. A community-based and participatory approach involving and empowering users and managers of local communities is necessary to balance the various needs and demands on available resources. This course will explore important concepts and strategies for successful participatory water conservation strategies to ensure long-term, sustainable solutions to managing water resources effectively in communities around the world.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Work with communities using tools such as social asset mapping to identify value-based water and sanitation priorities and implement these into their community development plans
  • Deliver training and develop capacity of local communities
  • Understand how to integrate users and managers of local communities, government bodies, and various stakeholders into all components of effective water management plans

Instructor:

Vanitha Sivarajan, M.S.

Vanitha’s background includes over 10 years of conservation and water resource management with local communities, non-governmental organizations, governmental agencies, and the private sector.  She has worked on natural resource management initiatives both domestically and internationally with a focus on Latin America, India, and the U.S. Vanitha’s areas of programmatic knowledge and expertise include climate change adaptation, participatory water resource management, community-based conservation, and international development.  Vanitha holds a Master of Environmental Management degree from Yale University, where she specialized in water science, policy and management.  She was also a William J. Clinton Fellow and holds an undergraduate degree from University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in Microbiology and Anthropology.

Currently Vanitha is a Development and Outreach Consultant for Model Forest Policy Program and Wildlands Network where she promotes water resource protection and resilient rural communities from climate impacts as well as connectivity in North America.  She is also the Sustainability Director for World Water Relief, working to ensure the long-term success of water and sanitation projects in the Dominican Republic and Haiti.


MICRO-FINANCE PROJECTS:  SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & THE ROLE OF WOMEN

Course Tuition:  $390
Continuing Education Units (CEUs): 2
Duration: 5 weeks

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Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
June 9 – July 14, 2017 June 5, 2017 Open

Course Description

In the context of developing communities across the world, the role of microenterprise is crucial. Identification of people who would undertake micro enterprise is the first important step. Identification of projects to fit the people and their needs and equipping people with the basic skills to run micro-enterprises profitably is the next step in the process. Women-oriented projects are vital as self-esteem building activities for women whose micro enterprises typically, in the long run, produce far reaching economic and social impact for the entire community.

Micro-enterprises have become an important vehicle of development for developing economies. They are small-scale, low-investment projects that provide fulfillment and fairly immediate income generation. This has a great impact on boosting self-confidence which in turn affects family and social life.

Micro enterprises greatly influence the women who, in developing economies, are generally uneducated or semi-educated, are dominated by men, and have relatively low societal status. Micro enterprises energize women to become economically self-sufficient, empower them to be emotionally self-confident, and enable them to have a voice in society. Their newly acquired influence reflects in improved living conditions at home and better prospects for their children’s futures.

Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Explain the role and impacts of micro-finance.
  • Recognize the different types of micro-enterprises: manufacturing, agricultural and non-agricultural based industries, marketing and providing services.
  • Develop a microfinance pilot project.

Instructor:

Kamala Parekh, M.S.

Kamala has a Master’s in Economics from the University of Allahabad, India. Radio Journalism with a BBC affiliated International Broadcasting Company. Community Development Training: Institute of Cultural Affairs-International, Chicago, USA.  Currently she coordinates village and community based activities in Maharashtra, teaches English language to non-English speaking European women in Maharashtra, trains village women and craftsmen in making and marketing local handicrafts in Zambia and India, trains government and private sector multinational organizations and NGOs in the techniques of community development through participative methods, and has coordinated an entrepreneurial development program for village youth in Maharashtra in collaboration with Village Earth.  She also conducts Personality Development Courses for college and university students in India, conducts finishing school courses/women’s empowerment workshops (‘Stree Shakti’) for rural and urban women in India, and holds summer camps for children through non-academic activities to develop their overall personality and build confidence.  Kamala teaches an online course in Microfinance and the Role of Women in Sustainable Community Development.


PARTICIPATORY MONITORING & EVALUATION

Course Tuition:  $390
Continuing Education Units: 2
Duration: 5 weeks

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Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
June 9 – July 14, 2017 June 5, 2017 Open

Course Description

Discover participatory methods in monitoring and evaluation for community development, where multiple stakeholders are involved in the process of planning, collecting, interpreting, communicating, and using information. Gain skills in using regular monitoring and evaluation processes, which will lead to continuous improvements.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Plan a monitoring and evaluation project
  • Develop evaluation questions that address stakeholders needs
  • Select the most appropriate data collection method for a given situation
  • Effectively communicate monitoring and evaluation data
  • Use the monitoring information for effective feedback and improvement

Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation

Pilar Robledo

Pilar is currently Director of Programming and Training for US Peace Corps in Kiev, Ukraine. She’s also serves as Education Cluster Co-lead at UNICEF Pakistan. Previously she’s worked for UNHCR, Save the Children, International Rescue Committee, and IREX. She holds an MPA in Public Administration from University of Colorado, Denver and a BA in Anthropology and Latin American Studies from CU Boulder.

Village Earth Launches Latest Version of the Pine Ridge Land Information System for Members of Oglala Sioux Tribe

Village Earth has launched the latest version of its web-based mapping system for members of the Oglala Sioux Tribe. The original Pine Ridge Land Information System (PRLIS) was  originally launched back in 2012 in partnership with the Oglala Sioux Tribe Land Office and with support from the Indian Land Tenure Foundation. Preceding the PRLIS was the Pine Ridge Allottee Land Planning Map Book. The impetus for all these projects was the desire of Lakota landowners to gain more information about their land resources, in particular, to be able to identify parcels where they own an interest.

Today, of the remaining 1,773,716 acres of land on Pine Ridge, nearly 1,067,877 acres (60%) is allotted to individuals. Over a century of unplanned inheritance has created a situation where lands have become severely fractioned. This created a management nightmare where, in order for a land owner to utilize their lands, they may have to get the signed approval of dozens, hundreds or even thousands of separate land owners. As a result of this complexity, most land owners on Pine Ridge have few choices be-sides leasing their lands out as part of the Tribal/BIA Range Unit leasing system. Nearly 65% of all lands on Pine Ridge are included in these Range units.

 

 

Naturally, this situation has had a dramatic impact on the overall economy on Pine Ridge. Like other Reservations across the United States, fractionation is a major obstacle to housing and business development but also native owned farms and ranches. According to the USDA 2012 Census of Agriculture for American Indian Reservations, the market value of agriculture commodities produced on the Pine Ridge Reservation in 2012 totaled $87 million. Yet, less than 1/3 ($24 million) of that income went to Native American producers.

Pine Ridge Allotments

In addition to parcel information, Village Earth and the OST Land Office has made available the original allotment map for Pine Ridge. Until now, this information was not available to members of the tribe and over the years, many people have asked us to try get this information for them so they can can begin to reconstruct the history of their lands, especially lands liquidated by the Federal Government through a process known as forced fee patenting. The creation and issuing of allotments began on the Pine Ridge Reservation in 1904, under Executive Order of July 29, 1904 and continued until 1923. During this period, government officials carved up the Reservation into parcels and issued them to Lakota families.

The PRLIS also includes:

  • Basemaps including recent high resolution satellite imagery
  • The historic treaty boundaries
  • NRCS designated prime agriculture lands
  • Range units
  • Tutorials on how to locate your lands using your Individual Trust Interest Report

We plan to continue to add new layers and information the PRLIS as they become available. We also invite suggestions by commenting below or contacting [email protected]