50% Off Our 1,050 Volume Appropriate Technology Library, While Supplies Last

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Get ready for your summer field work with the most comprehensive, compact, and cost effective appropriate technology and sustainable living resource in the world! The AT Library contains the full text and images from over 1050 of the best books dealing with all areas of do-it-yourself technology. Portable and easy to use on 28 CDs or 2 DVDs. The AT Library is currently in use in sustainable development projects in over 74 countries worldwide. It’s like a portable internet of appropriate technology solutions!

Here’s What Customers Have To Say:

The AT Library has been a great resource for us in teaching in all of these areas. We could never have brought all of these resources with us in a printed form, but thanks to the AT Library we had information readily available.

– Lance & Debra Sprick, Life Resource Foundation, Iligan City, Philippines

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Or call +1-970-237-3002 ext. 504 for more information or to order your library using a credit card over the telephone. Click here for a Complete list of Books in the Appropriate Technology Library

Medical Services Provided by VE Global Affiliate, Empowering Youth Cambodia

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Providing healthcare to urban slum area residents

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Empowering Youth in Cambodia (EYC) provides weekly medical clinics in their four schools, as well as dental care and health education.  The program has been a tremendous success and the results from 2014 are substantial; 3,200 patient-doctor visits (medical checks are open to the community), 320 student-visits to the dentist, 130 women and 1 man provided access to family planning.  Further, EYC staff and partners follow up with patients as needed to ensure their health needs are addressed, particularly with their students.

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Student Srey, 17 years old, had significant acne problems due to an allergic reaction after receiving a prescription from an unqualified, low-cost doctor that her mother took her to.

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Srey is a young leader in EYC who excels in her academics both in public school and English classes in EYC. After her family was evicted from their house three years ago she moved into an EYC school and volunteers with several programs including teaching traditional dance to children.

 

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Another student, Srey, 15 years old, had a visibly disturbing issue of no front teeth. The staff of EYC recognized the issue and EYC’s social worker discussed treatment with her and her family.

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She needed six new teeth and the family was able to pay for half of the cost.

 

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The new teeth came in very nicely and she now smiles brightly and is confident to talk to people

She would like to say “thanks to EYC donors to help with the payment and for bringing me to fix my teeth. My life is much better now.”   The combination of poor hygiene and diet (low nutrition levels + plenty of sugary foods) have created a dental crisis for many young people in urban poor areas of Cambodia.

A very appreciative beneficiary is Khon Sophat, a 28 year old former factory worker who is currently a mother of four.  Her husband is a motor taxi driver and they rent a small rent house for $10 per month. Their children are ages 6, 4, 2 and 4 months. EYC’s social worker Koun Lyna was referred to her and after providing education to her on her birth control options, brought her to see the doctor at Maries Stopes clinic where she got an IUD.  Lyna said “she is very happy to get an IUD. It’s really helpful to her and her family as she now has time to look after the family and the expenses of four young children also.”  Lyna is an ongoing resource if needed.

New Photos from Village Earth Global Affiliate SGDI – West Bengal, India

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International Women’s Day Rally

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International Women’s Day Rally

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community well for drinking water



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International women day celebration

 

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Annual SHG conference and financial literacy awareness.

 

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Micro enterprise by tribal women -part of SHG economic activities in Purulia.

 

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Micro enterprise by tribal youth through livelihood initiative ( part of social protection of tribal ). Its an initiative to main stream tribal youths to engage in economic ventures.

 

Help Bring Kamayura Chief to UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in NYC

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Maloca just launched its first fundraiser for 2015 to bring – for the first Ktime – the Kamayura cacique (chief) Kotok from Xingu Indigenous Park in Brazil to New York. The chief will attend the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues where he will bring important messages from Xingu, will exchange experiences with other leaders and will learn first-hand about mechanisms and tools Indigenous Peoples have to defend their human rights, traditional knowledge and their territories. He will forge alliances with foundations and universities in the hope this will open doors for the Kamayura to receive much needed support .The cacique will raise awareness on the incredibly well preserved Kamayura culture and territory (which they want to keep intact for as long as they can, a most difficult job due to aggressive penetration of outside economic interest and western cultural elements).

A key date is March 18th when Global Giving will match 30% the donations made that day. Here is the fundraiser link:  https://www.globalgiving.org/microprojects/bring-the-kamayura-chief-to-the-united-nations/.

If we succeed to bring the cacique in New York, Maloca will organize a series of events that will enable the chief to promote the Kamayura culture and introduce the cacique Kotok Kamayura to the international public in NYC.

We have finally received a photo of the fishing net Maloca succeeded to provide for the Kamayura.  This was a great success for Maloca and its supporters, and the Kamayura send their heartfelt thank you to everybody who made purchasing the fishing net possible.  This fishing net will not only provide food for upcoming inter-tribal festivities, but will grant the survival of several sacred rites associated with caring for and use of the net, rites in which the whole village partakes. More photos to come in the summer, when the fishing net will be used in the Kwaryp ritual!

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How Sustainable Land-Based Economic Development Promotes Tribal Sovereignty and Self-Determination

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LakotaLands

Support this project at https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/acquire-lands-for-lakota-cultural-and-bison-camp/x/9855461#home

Believe it or not, land is one of the most underutilized resources available to Plains Indian Tribes and Tribal members. And unlike other sources of income, sustainable land utilization can bolster Tribal sovereignty, self-determination and cultural revitalization. Consider these statistics, according to the Indian Land Working Group, 6 of the 9 million acres of Indian Lands suitable for agriculture in the United States are leased to non-native and consequently, non-natives collect 92% of all agricultural income generated on these lands.

The leasing of Indian Lands by the Federal Government dates back the the the Act of February 28, 1891 which amended the General Allotment Act to give the Secretary of the Interior the power to determine whether an Indian allottee had the “mental or physically qualifications” to enable him to cultivate his allotment. In such cases, the Superintendent was authorized to lease their lands to non-tribal members. In 1894, the annual Indian Appropriation Act increased the agricultural lease term to 5 years, 10 years for business and mining leases, and permitted forced leases for allottees who “suffered” from “inability to work their land,” and dramatically increased the number of leases issued across the country (Source:LLRP).

These policies have meant that the Indian landowners across the country have been separated from their allotted lands, in many cases, for generations. In fact, many Tribal land owners know very little about their lands; where they are located, how they are being used, who they share ownership with, etc. This has had devastating impacts on the ability of landowners to manage and benefit from their land-based resources – economically or culturally.

Since 2003 the Lakota Lands Recovery Project has been providing direct support support to individual American Indians seeking utilize their lands. The most recent effort is a project initiated by Edward Iron Cloud III on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Mr. Iron Cloud seeks to acquire a lease to 1500 acres of land on the Reservation to establish a cultural camp for native youth and a campsite for tourists and different organizations visiting the Reservation. The lease for this land is only $8000 per year so by being creative and developing revenue streams from the land, like tourism, that do not require a lot of start-up capital, he can transform this land into something that more directly benefits his family and his community. Of course, the emergence of crowdfunding sites like Indiegogo.com and Kickstarter.com as well as online “reservation” services like AirBnb.com, Homeaway.com, VRBL.com, etc open up new possibilities for non-agriculture based enterprises on Reservation lands.

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Some of these sustainable low-capital enterprises viable on a reservation setting might include.

  • Renting campsites using online booking services like AirBnb
  • Horseback riding
  • Hunting
  • Fishing
  • Birdwatching
  • Collecting wild plants
  • Making land available to groups for camps, ecological research projects, etc.

Unlike conventional agriculture, enterprises like the ones listed have a greater multiplier effect (keeping dollars changing hands locally) in their communities by creating more local jobs and benefiting the entire support economy by increasing patronage at local gas stations, restaurants, hotels, supermarkets, etc.

If you’re interested in utilizing land on your reservation, contact David Bartecchi at david@villageearth.org

Buy and Sell New & Used Items on Village Earth’s Online Auction – Now through Jan. 19th.

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Looking to get rid of that ugly sweater you received from Aunt Mildred or those slippers you know you’ll never use? Or maybe you have some items laying around the house that you’ve been wanting to sell? Here’s a great way to sell those items while benefiting Village Earth.

It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3.

  1. Go to Village Earth’s Auction Page at http://givingworks.ebay.com/charity-auctions/charity/village-earth/65425/
  2. Choose how much of the sale price you want to donate to Village Earth (from 10% – 100%). 
  3. Click on the “List Your Item” button (see below). Plus, charity listings on eBay have up to 30% higher sell through rates then non-Charity items and they sell for between 2-6% higher prices.

 

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Browse and Buy Items Listed by Our Supporters Below

Auction

 

Need a Last Minute Gift Idea? Send a Donation Gift Card that Benefits Village Earth

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Need a unique last minute gift idea? This year, make a donation in honor of your friend, relative, coworker, neighbor etc. and they’ll receive an attractive custom printed gift card. You can choose to have Globalgiving.org mail a high quality paper card or you can print or email it for no additional charge.

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To give a gift card, simply choose the “Gift or In-Honor Of” tab below the donate button on any of Village Earth’s projects pages on Globalgiving.org (see list below).

 

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Choose your method of delivery and amount and then you can choose one of three card design options.

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Below is a list of Village Earth’s projects listed on Globalgiving.org.

MniGGLLRPGGGeneralGG SGDIGG TitukukeGG KnifeChiefGG EarthTIpiGG DinehGG MalocaGG LivingRootsGG

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Village Earth Honors International Human Rights Day, Wednesday Dec. 12th, 2014.

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The UN General Assembly proclaimed 10 December as Human Rights Day in 1950, to bring to the attention ‘of the peoples of the world’ the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as the common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations.

Today, Village Earth honors International Human Rights Day with a reaffirmation of our commitment to the defense and protection of the rights endowed in Humans and all living creators. A human rights-based approach is at the core of what we do. This means doing more than making an bad situation a little better or helping people do more with less. Instead, it means engaging with community in a dialogue about the root causes of poverty and oppression and working side-by-side to transform them.  Furthermore, this approach, this philosophy, recognizes the importance of local leaders and their organizations as the primary actors in change, rather than outside NGOs, academics, or experts. We believe a human rights-based approach must also consider justice, the intergenerational impacts of oppression (both material and psychological), and the necessity for governments, corporations and individuals to adequately and respectfully remedy past wrongs.

Read more about Village Earth’s Approach.

Order Tanka Bar and Support Lakota Bison Restoration and Land Recovery Efforts

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This Holiday Season, give the gift the healthy, delicious buffalo meat products produced by Native American Natural Foods, a 100% Native American owned and operated business based on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Even better, 20%  of each order will support Lakota Bison Restoration and Land Recovery/Restoration Efforts. 

All Tanka Products are 100% Natural, never use Preservatives, Erythorbates, Potassium Sorbate, Fillers, or Artificial Flavors. They are Certified Gluten-Free by the Gluten Free Certification Organization (GFCO). They are also Soy-Free, and contain NO Hormones or Antibiotics, and NO MSG. There are NO added Nitrites or Nitrates. Our products are packed full of Energy. At Native American Natural Foods, we follow the stringent Whole Foods product approval list.

Use the links below to order online at Native American Natural Foods. We’ll receive 20% of anything you order from their site.

 

 

TANKA BAR

GLUTEN-FREE * NITRATES-FREE * MSG-FREE * HORMONE-FREE

Made from tart-sweet cranberries and prairie-raised buffalo, the Tanka Bar is a delicious real food bar with a smoky, slightly-sweet flavor.

100% Natural and only 70-calories, Tanka Bars are the perfect food for anyone who’s on the go — athletes, outdoor enthusiasts, students, busy moms, and pow-wow dancers. Gluten-free, hormone-free and low-fat, the Tanka Bars are deliciously perfect for every diet lifestyle. Tanka Bars are guaranteed shelf-stable for up to 12 months.

There are three delicious flavors to choose from:

  • APPLE ORANGE PEEL
  • SLOW SMOKED ORIGINAL
  • SPICY PEPPER

 

TANKA BITES

GLUTEN-FREE * NITRATES-FREE * MSG-FREE * HORMONE-FREE

With the same great taste and amazing nutrition as the Tanka Bars, our Tanka Bites feature 3 ounces of bite-size buffalo and cranberry nuggets in a resealable package.

Tanka Bites are the perfect way to enjoy Tanka’s grass-fed bison goodness with your family and friends. Since the Bites come in 3-oz. pouches, you don’t have to hoard your Bison anymore.

There are three delicious flavors to choose from:

  • APPLE ORANGE PEEL
  • SLOW SMOKED ORIGINAL
  • SPICY PEPPER

Like the bars, Tanka Bites are also 100% Natural, 70 calories per serving, low-fat, gluten-free and hormone-free. Throw some in your purse, backpack or your saddlebag to enjoy on the trail. Tanka Bites are guaranteed shelf-stable for up to 12 months.

TANKA STICKS

GLUTEN-FREE * NITRATES-FREE * MSG-FREE * HORMONE-FREE

A great alternative to the usual processed sticks, Tanka Sticks combine the goodness of prairie-raised Buffalo and tart-sweet Cranberries in a convenient, eat-as-you-go snack stick.

Perfect for a quick, healthy pick-me-up, the 1-ounce Tanka Sticks come in three great flavors:

  • APPLE ORANGE PEEL
  • SLOW SMOKED ORIGINAL
  • SPICY PEPPER

Tanka Wild Gourmet Summer Sausage: In addition to our great Sticks, this recipe is also available as a Gourmet Summer Sausage. Tender and savory, this perfectly seasoned sausage also features the delicious combination of Buffalo, Cranberries and Wild Rice. Available in Original flavor only.

Tanka Sticks and Gourmet Summer Sausages are 100% Natural, low-fat, gluten-free and hormone-free and guaranteed shelf-stable for up to 12 months.

TANKA ONNIT WARRIOR BAR

GLUTEN-FREE * NITRATES-FREE * MSG-FREE * HORMONE-FREE

Made from tart-sweet cranberries, jalapeno and habanero peppers, and prairie-raised buffalo, the Tanka Onnit Warrior is a delicious 2-ounce real food bar with 14 grams of protein and 140 calories.

Perfect as a “recovery food” for high-performance athletes, Tanka Onnit Warrior Bars are gluten-free, hormone-free and low-fat. They are guaranteed shelf-stable for up to 12 months.

 

 

TANKA GOURMET BUFFALO JERKY

GLUTEN-FREE * NITRATES-FREE * MSG-FREE * HORMONE-FREE

Created because YOU asked for it, our Tanka Gourmet Buffalo Cranberry Jerky is deliciously meaty, wholly satisfying and 100 percent natural.

Made from top premium whole-muscle cuts, we slow-cure each slice of our tender Gourmet Buffalo Jerky in real cranberries, with no artificial ingredients. This is simply the best buffalo jerky you will ever taste.

Tanka Gourmet Buffalo Jerky is guaranteed shelf-stable for up to 12 months.

TANKA GIFTS

GLUTEN-FREE * NITRATES-FREE * MSG-FREE * HORMONE-FREE

We’re happy to introduce our new selection of Tanka Gifts, perfect for any special occasion. Choose from a seasonally available assortment of gift baskets, each filled with a carefully chosen selection of healthy Tanka products that are perfect to share with family, friends and co-workers.

Smoky and slightly sweet, Tanka Bars, Tanka Bites, and Tanka Sticks are made from tart-sweet cranberries and prairie-raised buffalo. All are 100% Natural and only 70-calories per serving. Gluten-free, hormone-free and low-fat, Tanka products are deliciously perfect for every lifestyle.

Seasonally available in a range of sizes, Tanka gift baskets are right for holidays, birthdays, anniversaries or just to make someone smile.

NOTE: Not all gift baskets are available year-round.

Remembering Dr. Edwin F. Shinn, Co-Founder of Village Earth and Champion of Human Development

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Ed_ShinnThe entire Village Earth family is deeply saddened by the loss of one of our founders, Dr. Edwin F. Shinn who passed away on Friday, November 28th, 2014 at the age of 80. Ed was an extremely kind and humble human being with a spark in his eye that inspired everyone he touched. Serving as Executive Director of Village Earth from 1993 to 2008, Ed was known by staff and volunteers for his unwavering optimism and ability to not only see the “gift” in everyone he encountered but to help them see it as well. As a leader, he was adamant about inclusiveness and participation by everyone, always insisting that both staff and volunteers participate in shaping what Village Earth would become. He was an inspirational, even ecstatic leader and trainer, who had the remarkable ability to lead a group of seemingly unrelated people on a journey beyond the surface-level and into a realm of “deep connectedness”. More than anyone, it was Ed who infused Village Earth with its spirit and culture of participation.

Ed would usually begin a training or workshop with the story of his “awakening” – when, in 1965 he was living with is wife and young children as a new Presbyterian minister in Los Angeles and was driving away on vacation when, in his rear view mirror, he could see the Watts Neighborhood burning from riots incited by a violent encounter between police and a 21 year-old African American man. That experience deeply affected him and initiated a search for meaning, which led Ed and his wife Miriam “Mimi” a year later to the Ecumenical Institute (EI) based on the west side of Chicago. EI would later become the Institute for Cultural Affairs (ICA). While in Chicago, they worked on EI’s “Fifth City Project” in Chicago’s East Garfield Park Community.

 Above is a video created by the ICA to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Fifth City project.

In 1973, Ed and Mimi were called to Oombulgurri, Western Australia to support an Aboriginal elder help his people escape the degrading conditions in Wyndham to form a community on their ancestral lands in a remote part of the Australian outback. The story of the ups and downs of this awe-inspiring community effort were captured in the book “Outback Odyssey” written by Ed’s wife.

In the late 1970s, Ed and Mimi would move to Maliwada, India to work on an ICA Human Development Project and later were part of a Human Development Training School. According to Vinod Parekh, one of Ed’s colleagues at the school, “Ed inspired hundreds of youth with his unending vitality and zest for life.”

He continued to work for ICA as an organizer and trainer, venturing to Kenya, Peru, Guatemala, rural California, Indonesia, and Egypt. While being a gifted facilitator who loved working with people, Ed was always concerned with the big picture – with models and processes and was constantly seeking input and revising his models about how to “transform vast regions across the globe.”  In the 1980s, while in his 50s, he decided to return to school to try to answer some of the particularly challenging questions that were nagging him during all his experiences in rural development. In particular, he was concerned with the problem of scale namely, “what size of population was most effective for the mobilization of resources?” As he would say, “too small and  you’re always dependent on the outside, too large and things become top-down.” He was directed to Colorado State University where at the time, there was a lot of engagement in international development assistance. He was accepted into the Ph.D. program in Sociology and carried-out field research working to form Water User’s Associations on a large-scale irrigation project in Pakistan. His dissertation titled The social organization of irrigation in the Niazbeg command area: the Punjab, Pakistan was accepted in 1987 and consisted of two volumes with over 630 pages.

Soon after completing his Ph.D., Ed and Mimi left for Egypt where he helped to develop an Irrigation Advisory Service and trained its personnel to work with farmers in setting up water user organizations to improve irrigated agriculture. Afterward, they moved back to Fort Collins and guided a cooperative development exchange relationship between Mexican and US communities known as Partner Communities. They also helped Dr. Maurice Albertson organize an international conference on sustainable village-based development which was held September 28 – October 2 , 1993 at Colorado State University. It was attended by approximately 250 delegates from 40 different countries. The majority of those in attendance were from developing nations and represented local non-governmental organizations working in very grassroots and participatory projects around the world. More than 200 papers were submitted and formed five volumes of Proceedings. By the end of the conference it was agreed that the hosts should form a consortium made up of the participants. The purpose of the organization, originally called the Consortium for Sustainable Village-Based Development (CSVBD), would be to launch several pilot projects, provide training in the methods discussed at the conference, and provide monitoring and evaluation services and coordinate demonstration projects on the ground. According to Ed, “Perhaps one of the most important functions of CSVBD is to insure that the local NGOs build teams with expertise in key development sectors that can interact with both the public and private sectors to secure needed resources.” CSVBD officially changed its name to Village Earth in 2000.

Below is one of the last videos of Ed, talking about his history working in community development and general philosophies of life. 

Ed served as Executive Director for Village Earth from its inception in 1993 to 2008 and oversaw the realization and growth of the organization including developing and delivering numerous sessions of Village Earth’s flagship training “Participatory Practices for Sustainable Development”, assisting with the growth of the Nigeria’s Youth Service Corps, helping to develop micro-finance projects in Pune and Nasik India, assisting with the development of two large cluster development programs in Nepal, consulting on projects with Mercy Corps International, International Rescue Committee, CHF and CARE, helping to create a Ph.D. program in Sustainable Development Management at Trisakti University in Jakarta Indonesia and overseeing the creation of Village Earth’s Online Certificate Program in Sustainable Community Development at Colorado State University. He remained a part of Village Earth’s Board of Directors until his passing 2014. We are certain Ed has found a comfortable place among the cosmos.

Help Village Earth Raise $45,000 for Grassroots Organizations Around the Globe

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Contribution

From day one, Village Earth has been focused on the singular question of “How do we support communities to mobilize and work towards their vision for the future without creating dependence or undermining their own best efforts?”  Village Earth’s Global Affiliate Program, started in 2011, is our answer to this question.

The Global Affiliate Program was founded on the belief that local community organizations or groups can best identify their own needs and aspirations. It works by providing a support structure that enables community groups to access information and to find the resources they need to enhance or expand what they are already doing, or would like to do in a sustainable future as they envision it.We are proud to partner with such groups as:

  • Empowering Youth Cambodia: working with the next generation of youth leaders living in Cambodia’s over-crowded urban slums;
  • Forum for Community Change and Development in South Sudan: advancing the rights of women in a country in deep conflict;
  • Jenzera: working to protect the rights and territories of indigenous and ethnic minorities in Colombia.

These are just three of the 17 different grassroots organizations that are part of our Global Affiliate Program.

Below is how one Global Affiliate describes the support we provide:

1185047_524887214257669_1026588554_nThe Knife Chief Buffalo Nation Organization, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD.“Knife Chief Buffalo Nation, a grassroots organization on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, raises buffalo and provides for their care as they provide spiritual and physical nourishment for the Lakota people.  The buffalo are central to the Lakota spiritual way of life and we are honored to do this work although it is often very challenging to obtain resources for all that is needed to be done.  Village Earth helps Knife Chief Buffalo Nation to meet these challenges by providing technical assistance, fiscal accountability and support for our work.  We are fortunate to have such an organization to partner with!”– Ethleen Iron Cloud Two Dogs, Board Member of Knife Chief Buffalo Nation Organization
Last year, with your support, Village Earth distributed over $75,000 in flexible micro-grants to support community-driven development projects including:
  • Providing computer training for 120 Cambodian youth.
  • Training Lakota youth in sustainable home building on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation
  • Providing human rights training to women in South Sudan.
  • See insert for more about each Global Affiliate and their projects.

This year, we are excited to build on the success of our Global Affiliate Program (now in its 3rd year) by enhancing our support for our existing Global Affiliates through expanded outreach and training opportunities while opening the program up to more organizations.  In fact, we are currently reviewing applications  from organizations in Senegal, Liberia, and Cambodia—all of which look very promising.

If you are already a supporter of Village Earth, we encourage you to renew your commitment now.  If you are new, we welcome you to our growing network of grassroots organizations and allies!

 

 Choose to donate to one of our
Global Affiliates 
below
or
use the
button to the right to let Village Earth
decide 
how best to utilize your donation. 

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 AffiliateTabs_05 fund-project
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 AffiliateTabs_30  fund-project
 AffiliateTabs_23  fund-project
 AffiliateTabs_25  fund-project
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 AffiliateTabs_28  fund-project
 AffiliateTabs_20  fund-project
 AffiliateTabs_31  fund-project
AffiliateTabs_35  fund-project

50% Off the 1,050 Volume Appropriate Technology eBook Library. While Supplies Last!

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The most comprehensive, compact, and cost effective appropriate technology and sustainable living resource in the world! The AT Library contains the full text and images from over 1050 of the best books dealing with all areas of do-it-yourself technology. Portable and easy to use on 28 CDs or 2 DVDs. The AT Library is currently in use in sustainable development projects in over 74 countries worldwide. It’s like a portable internet of appropriate technology solutions!

Here’s What Customers Have To Say:

The AT Library has been a great resource for us in teaching in all of these areas. We could never have brought all of these resources with us in a printed form, but thanks to the AT Library we had information readily available.

– Lance & Debra Sprick, Life Resource Foundation, Iligan City, Philippines

Device-Icons

4-15-2014 11-45-14 AM

Or call +1-970-237-3002 ext. 504 for more information or to order your library using a credit card over the telephone. Click here for a Complete list of Books in the Appropriate Technology Library

Ways to Support Village Earth and Our Global Affiliates This Holiday Season

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supportVillageEarth

The Holidays are an important time for our Global Affiliates. During the months of November and December is when our Affiliates receive a significant percentage of their donations for the year. This year, we have set a goal of raising $40,000 by December 30th (the end of the 2013-2014 tax-year). Below are some ways you can help us achieve this goal.


 

Become a Village Earth Holiday Campaign Captain

Join our end of year fundraising team by becoming a Campaign Captain. Captains set a personal fundraising goal to support one or more affiliates and then reach out to their friends, family, church, or other social networks to raise funds. If you’re interested in becoming a captain or learning more about the opportunity, please contact david@villageearth.org.


 

Form a Giving Circle

Do you ever wish that you could do more than than just a contribute $20 or $50 dollars to a project that in total may cost many thousands of dollars? Wouldn’t it be nice to fund an entire project and have a more intimate role with all phases of implementation? If you answered yes to the questions, than you should organize a giving circle.

“Giving circles are a form of philanthropy where groups of individuals donate their own money or time to a pooled fund, decide together where to give these away to charity or community projects and, in doing so, seek to increase their awareness of and engagement in the issues covered by the charity or community project. Many circles, in addition to donating their money, also contribute their time and skills to support causes.” — Wikipedia

If you are interested in forming a giving a circle Village Earth can help. We offer the following benefits for groups that make a pledge to raising funds for any of Village Earth’s Global Affiliates. This might include:

  • In-person presentations for your circle so they can learn about our Affiliates or dialogue about the status of project they have funded.
  • Regular telephone or video conferences with project leaders around the globe.
  • Site visits to see or help implement  projects your circle has funded.

To facilitate the formation of your giving circle, we have partnered with SocialFund.org.

Social Fund is for groups of people who want to start combined charitable giving accounts. You start one with your family, friends, student organization, or faith community, and pitch in each month. After a few months have passed, your fund votes on where to give out grants, with more than 1.8 million charities to choose from!

We recommend Social Fund for groups that may dispersed or who are unfamiliar with one-another and need a way to efficiently collaborate and collect funds online. Village Earth can also create an account for your group, when you reach a certain account balance your group can then decide how to allocate those funds, either to one or more projects. For more information contact David Bartecchi david@villageearth.org


 

Respond to our Annual Appeal Letter

Each year during the week of Thanksgiving, Village Earth sends out a physical mailing to thousands of our supporters. Responding to this letter by sending a check is one of the best ways to donate since there are no transactions fees. We usually mirror this letter by email for those people for which we don’t have a physical mailing address. You can respond either by donating online or by sending a check in the mail. You can use the form on the sidebar if you would like to join our mailing list.

Alternatively you can, save us a stamp and donate now online or send a check to:

Village Earth
PO Box 797
Fort Collins, Co. 80522


 

 

Contribute to One of Our Microprojects at Globalgiving.org

While we prefer that people already familiar with Village Earth or our Global Affiliates donate directly via check (to avoid transaction fees) several of our affiliates will be running campaigns on Globalgiving.org. If you’re employer provides matching or gives Globalgiving.org gift cards, please choose a project from one of our Global Affiliates. Plus, on December 2nd (Giving Tuesday), Globalgiving.org and Microsoft will be matching donations dollar-for-dollar for all donations to Empowering Youth Cambodia made at Globalgiving.org


 

Donate Your Car, Boat or RV!

car-donatWhy go through the hassle of selling your old car, boat or RV when we’ll handle the whole process for you? Donating your car can be a fast and easy way to make a significant contribution to Village Earth or one of our affiliates. Plus, you’ll get a tax-deduction for the value of your vehicle. We use the trusted V-DAC service (also used by NPR’s Car Talk) to help streamline the car donation process for donors living anywhere in the United States. Click here or the link below to donate your used car. Note: please contact us if you’re donation is intended for one of our Affiliates.

Vehicle Donation

 Processing/Transaction Fees: Village Earth retains up to 70% – 75% of Net Recovery of Vehicle.


 

Support Village Earth whenever you buy or sell something on eBay.com

Looking to get rid of those horrible slippers that you got as a Christmas gift from your aunt in Boca Raton? Or maybe you recently upgraded your phone or gaming system and need to clear some space – here’s a great way to get to get rid of that old stuff and benefit Village Earth at the same time. Now with eBay Giving Works, you can list your items and choose a percentage that will go to Village Earth once it’s sold. Not only are you support a good cause, but your item will stand out to buyers with a blue and yellow ribbon logo displayed right next to the item’s title. Charity listings on eBay have up to 30% higher sell through rates then non-Charity items and they sell for between 2-6% higher prices.

 

Here are some ideas on how you can use eBay Giving Works to support Village Earth. 

  • Host your own charity auction for Village Earth or one of our Global Affiliates
  • Get a tax-deduction for that old clunker vehicle, boat or RV in the driveway.
  • Liquidate the estate of a loved-one who has recently passed away.
  • Clean out that garage or attic.

To start listing items go to: http://givingworks.ebay.com/charity-auctions/charity/village-earth/65425/

Be sure to add Village Earth as one of your causes on eBay.

Follow us on eBay

EbayGivingWorks

 


 

Tell Your Friends on Social Media About Us.

Even if you aren’t able to make a financial contribution, you can help others learn about Village Earth and our Global Affiliates by sharing us with your friends on social media. Here’s how:

  • “Like” Village Earth and your favorite Global Affiliates on Facebook and “Follow” us on Twitter
  • “Like” and “Share” posts you like from Village Earth and our Affiliates. Be sure to comment and encourage your friends to support our work.
  • “Tweet” about @VillageEarthOrg and “Retweet” Tweets of ours that you like.

Update on the Work of VE Affiliate Maloca & it’s Alliance with the Kamayura People of Brazil.

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The past few months were very special and full of activity for Maloca, with a lot of work focusing on Brazil. During the summer, the director of Maloca took a trip down to Brazil, to be with the Kamayura people during one of their most important ceremonies, Kuarup, and brought them a video camera, memory cards, and a voice recorder, at their request. All the equipment has been purchased with fundraised money.
In the fall, the son of the Kamayura Cacique visited New York City, attending various events: People’s Climate March, the United Nations World Conference on Indigenous Peoples and the World Summit on Indigenous Philanthropy. This is a notable event, as it is for the first time a Kamayura travels abroad and participates in such important, global meetings. By enabling the participation of the Kamayura in these international events, and by fostering new connections between the Kamayura and the international Indigenous, activist, donor communities, we hope that we have opened a door of good opportunities for the Kamayura people.
While the son of the Cacique was in town, Maloca started a fundraiser, at the request of the Kamayura Cacique (chief), to purchase a seine fishing net for the village. Details of the current campaign and how peopel can still help, can be found here: http://malocacommunities.org/campaigns-2/current-campaign/.

Help Empowering Youth Cambodia’s Students Who Are in Need of Scholarships

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image001Empowering Youth in Cambodia (EYC) runs 4 schools/community centers in slums, serving over 600 students with educational programs.  Currently 30 students also receive direct support for their studies, mostly for university.  Additional students have applied for scholarships, and funds are needed to be able to support them.

One student is who was just awarded a scholarship is named Mai and she just passed the Cambodian high school exam (only 40% passed this year!).  She plans to study social work and she says,

“I would like to say thank you to donors that help me with my study.  I hope to work with youth in need of assistance one day, including those in the countryside who don’t have many opportunities.”

Mai is very studious but also enjoys ultimate Frisbee, cycling, and wants to learn how to swim. We know that Mai will go on to do great things and are happy to be a part of her journey.

Please help other students like Mai achieve their dreams and support EYC’s scholarship students. To donate, please go to; https://secure.donationpay.org/villageearth/youth_cambodia.php

Non-Natives Collect 84.5% of Agriculture Income on South Dakota Reservations

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Food_Insecurity_&_Value

The USDA recently released the results for their 2012 Census of Agriculture for Native American Reservations and as most Residents of South Dakota Reservations already know, non-native farmers and ranchers dominate. According to the USDA data, a whopping 84.5% of all agriculture income on South Dakota Reservations is collected by non-native producers. In terms of land control, non-native producers control nearly 60% of all agriculture land and 65% of all the active farms and ranches on Native American Reservations. Data for Individual South Dakota Reservations is below.

 % of Farms Operated by American Indians% of Land Controlled by American Indians% of Agricultural Income Collected by American Indians
TOTAL34.38%40.31%15.43%
Cheyenne River48%42.49%23%
Crow Creek27%NA1%
Flandreau Santee14%NA0%
Lake Traverse5%5.04%0%
Lower Brule39%44.14%39%
Pine Ridge55%61.98%28%
Rosebud31%36.80%17%
Standing Rock25%18.74%13%
Yankton18%2.46%1%

Despite the Federal Government’s “highest and best use” policy for Native American Lands, the USDA Agriculture Census data demonstrates that non-natives are the primary beneficiaries of the Resources from American Indian Reservations, not just in South Dakota but throughout the Untied States. The disparity that exists on Reservations today is the outcome of over a century of racist and exclusionary policies that functioned to alienate Tribal members from their lands to make their agricultural and mineral resources available to non-tribal members for lease below market rates. Many Tribal members weren’t even paid some or all of the lease income owed to them by the Federal Government. Even today, virtually all of the lease income collected on some South Dakota Reservations goes directly the USDA to pay down loans created in the 1970s and 1980s for tribes to consolidate highly fractionated lands (a problem created in the first place by the Federal government’s failure to properly manage the conveyance of allotted trust lands from one generation to the next).

World Food Day: Food Insecurity on South Dakota’s American Indian Reservations

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Today, October 16th, 2014 is World Food Day. The World Food Day theme for 2014 is Family Farming: “Feeding the world, caring for the earth”. While most Americans recognize the problem of hunger in so-called “developing countries.” Very few people comprehend the high levels of food insecurity that exists across the United States. This problem is especially acute on American Indian Reservations where a 120 years of exclusionary federal policies have pushed Tribal members off their own lands to make them available to non-tribal farmers and ranchers. This combined with high rates of poverty has created food desserts across indian country.

“Food deserts are defined as urban neighborhoods and rural towns without ready access to fresh, healthy, and affordable food. Instead of supermarkets and grocery stores, these communities may have no food access or are served only by fast food restaurants and convenience stores that offer few healthy, affordable food options. The lack of access contributes to a poor diet and can lead to higher levels of obesity and other diet-related diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease.”

The map above, developed by Village Earth’s Lakota Lands Recovery Project, draws on 2012 data collected by the US Census Bureau and compiled by www.feedingamerica.org to display the county-level data along with the boundaries of South Dakota’s American Indian Reservations. The data shows that on these Reservations, food insecurity (not having enough food within the past year) is has high as 26% percent, some of the highest rates in the country.

Village Earth is trying to transform this situation by supporting local, grassroots efforts to develop more sustainable, more healthy local food systems. For example, on the Pine Ridge Reservation, Village Earth is supporting efforts of the Knife Chief Buffalo Nation organization who seeks to acquire more land to expand their buffalo herds which provide both spiritual and nutritional sustenance for the Lakota people. Earth Tipi, another one of our Global Affiliates, is seeking funds to develop a demonstration “food forest” near the community of Manderson on the Pine Ridge Reservations. Food forests are a form of sustainable regenerative food systems that bring together assemblages of food bearing parennial plants that thrive in local soils and climate and require very little maintenance once established. On the Cheyenne River Reservation, another one of our Global Affiliates “Mni” is working to restore their lands and aquifers by promoting simple watershed restoration and holistic grazing managemnet practices.  The goal of which is to restore their lands and wild plants after 120 years of extractive grazing practices managed by the Federal Bureau of Indian Affairs.

All three of these Village Earth Global Affiliates are currently accepting donations through Globalgiving.org. Please consider making a donation on this World Food Day.

MnidEarthTipiKnifeChief

 

 

All Donations Matched 30% for VE Global Affiliates | Oct. 15th Globalgiving.org Bonus Day.

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Don’t miss out! For one day only, October 15th, 2014, Globalgiving.org will be matching all donations to select micro-projects of Village Earth Global Affiliates.

We at Village Earth believe the most effective and efficient way to support the empowerment of marginalized peoples around the globe is to support and strengthen their own local and indigenous-run organizations. This approach not only helps enhance local self-reliance but also ensures greater cultural and political self-determination. Yet, despite the widespread acknowledgement of  the effectiveness of local organizations in identifying and addressing issues, their work often goes unnoticed.

Below you’ll find a list of Village Earth Affiliates Eligible for the bonus day. Click on one to donate. 

 

Maloca


VE KnifeChief

Check Out These New T-Shirts & Sweat Shirts from VE Affiliate “Earth Tipi”

EarthTipiShirt

Get one of these T-Shirts and support Village Earth Global Affiliate “Earth Tipi” at the same time. These comfy 100% cotton t-shirts will quickly become your favorite way to show your support for Lakota Land use, natural building, and sustainable agriculture on the Pine Ridge Reservation. Hurry, popular sizes are running-out fast!

Earth Tipi T-Shirt
Quality 100% Cotton T-Shirts. Quote from Sitting Bull: Let us put our minds together and see what life we can make for our children. Earth Tipi logo on back. Proceeds Support Earth Tipi
$20.00
Size :
Earth Tipi Hoodie
Quality 100% Cotton Hoodie. Quote from Sitting Bull: Let us put our minds together and see what life we can make for our children. Earth Tipi logo on back. Proceeds Support Earth Tipi
$35.00
Size :

 

 

 

 

Agricultural Inequality on American Indian Reservations (2012 Ag Census infographic)

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The USDA-NASS recently published the results from their 2012 Census of Agriculture for American Indian Reservations. Naturally, we were interested in what this long-awaited data tells us about the degree of access that Tribal members have to their own lands who, through a history of exclusionary policies and discriminatory practices by the Federal Government,  have been pushed off their legally allotted lands to open them up to non-tribal farmers and ranchers – mostly through leasing programs managed by the Federal Bureau of Indian Affairs. We developed the infographic below to help illustrate what these numbers tells us. However, we feel these numbers, while the most complete to-date, still do not accurately reflect the actual situation of Agriculture on American Indian Reservations – which we believe to be much worse.

Agricultural Inequality AIAN


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: This infographic does not include data from the Navajo Nation because it represents an outlier relative to all other Reservations in the dataset.

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