2016 Holiday Fundraising Campaign to Support Village Earth’s Global Affiliates

2016holidaycampaign

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 Global Affiliate NameGeographic FocusAbout 
Facebook-Vert-LogoVillage Earth Area of Most NeedGlobalLet Village Earth decide how best to allocate your donation.
AmahoroAmahoro ProjectBurundiAmahoro project is a collaboration betweeen Colorado State University and Ngozi University in Burundi (UNG) to establish UNG as a ongoing site and dissemination center for research in sustainable peace and development.
CRDTCambodia Rural Development Team Northeast CambodiaWorks to sustainably improve food security, incomes, and living standards of subsistence rural communities in support of environmental conservation throughout Cambodia.
Earth TipiEarth TipiPine Ridge Reservation, SDWorks to sustainably improve food security, incomes, and living standards of subsistence rural communities in support of environmental conservation throughout Cambodia.
Eco_VEco-Friendly VolunteersSri LankaECO-V is a voluntary organization engaged in environmental conservation in Sri Lanka. ECO-V has a network of 400 volunteers throughout Sri Lanka who contribute to research and community work to support conservation of the environment.
EYCEmpowering Youth CambodiaPnom Penh, CambodiaEYC is a organization working to improve the lives of young people and their families. Our vision is to see youth empowered with skills & confidence to be leaders who actively develop themselves, their families and community.
FOFCODForum for Community Change and DevelopmentSouth SudanFOFCOD envisions a new generation of productive and self-reliant south Sudanese who can ably participate in community development programs to meet their needs and those of other disadvantaged groups.
GOLDGrowing Liberia Democracy (GOLD)LiberiaGOLD promotes poverty reduction as well as democratic & high quality governance by empowering local communities to effectively engage their law makers as to make policy decisions favorable for Liberians and to be fully transparent.
ICA_NEPAlInstitute of Cultural Affairs (Nepal)NepalICA’s mission is to promote social innovation through participation and community building. We do this throughout the country through training, facilitation & development activities.  
Human-and-Hope-Association-500x500Human and Hope AssociationSiem Reap, CambodiaHuman and Hope Association works to empower Cambodians to create sustainable futures for themselves through projects focused on education, vocational training and community support.
JalambaJalamba Nursery School ProjectThe GambiaThe goal of the of the Association is to empower youths, children and vulnerable families through education. The project has government support as a new school  which will serve ages of one through six. 
JenzeraJenzeraColombiaSupports community processes so that people can freely decide on their social, political and economic lives by defending their territories, empowering their own governments and developing a self-managed economies.
KnifeChiefKnife Chief Buffalo NationPine Ridge Reservation, SDThe Knife Chief Buffalo Nation, a grassroots project on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, works to reclaim 1800 acres of ancestral lands for restoring buffalo, and Lakota culture and lifeways.
LBCCLakota Buffalo Caretakers CooperativePine Ridge Reservation, SDThe Lakota Buffalo Caretakers Cooperative (LBCC) is a 100% Native American owned and operated cooperative association on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Its membership is made up of small family buffalo caretakers who respect the buffalo and the land. Members of the LBCC are committed to the restoration of the northern plains ecology, self-sufficiency and strengthening the sovereignty and self-determination of the Oglala Lakota Nation and all indigenous peoples.
LLRPLakota Lands Recovery ProjectSouth Dakota ReservationsThe LLRP works to reclaim and consolidate tribal lands and access the resources needed for the Lakota people to live on, protect, and utilize it — promoting self-determination and sovereignty.
MalocaMalocaAmazon BasinWorks with Indigenous Peoples living in the Amazon Basin. It works directly with Indigenous leaders to raise awareness about the needs of their communities and find means to establish self-sustaining strategies to address their needs.
TasunkeWakanTasunke WakanPine Ridge Reservation, SDOur primary goal is to develop and implement Lakol Wicohan (Lakota life ways and laws, which includes language, values, beliefs, ceremonies and laws of the Lakota people) within the Oyate (Community).
TRCDATitukuke RCDAPetuake, ZambiaTRCDA is devoted to to uplifting livelihoods, reducing illiteracy, poverty and HIV/AIDS Health problems among the communities in Petauke, Zambia

Amahoro Project: Infuse Peace Building Content with an Emphasis on Critical and Creative Thinking for the University of Ngozi, local communities and schools in Burundi, East Africa and Beyond

 

health-class-6-small-group

“Amahoro” is the Kirundi word for peace. Founded in 1999 with a commitment to peace and reconciliation, its University of Ngozi (UNG) is uniquely situated to be a laboratory for peace-building and sustainable development and the Amahoro Project hopes to help lead the way. We recognize that economic development will suffer if violence continues and that peace will be a casualty if communities remain mired in poverty. Burundi is one of the poorest countries in the world, emerging from colonization and forty years of violence. Recent conflicts currently threaten the last eight years of stability but conditions in the region of Ngozi have remained peaceful for many years and that is one of the principle reasons why we are working there. Those committed to this project believe that sustainable development must wed with restorative educational innovations to prepare new leaders to heal and foster civil society as basic infrastructure needs are addressed. In all our endeavors, we propose to use locally generated and regionally applicable case- and project-based learning along with ideas and skills for peace building (i.e.,  improved communication, cooperation, conflict resolution and more) to transform surface or memorized learning into a greater emphasis on critical and creative thinking. Over the course of this project, the UNG will be established as a viable center for research and development in sustainable peace and development. With this grant, those at the UNG can help Burundi forge (1) a recovery and rebirth of spirit, (2) reconcile wounds, differences, rivalries, prejudices, and hatreds, (3) resolve to understand the truth of the past, fix the present, and prepare for a better future; and (4) reinforce the resilience needed to rebuild an impoverished, post-colonial nation.

 

Benefits

There are currently some 1,700 students at the University of Ngozi. Our peace-building efforts will impact each of these students in every class they take throughout their college careers. Each new class of 400+ will enjoy a similar duel training in disciplinary case-based, problem-based, and project-based learning infused with peace building skills of improved communication, cooperation, conflict resolution, mediation and more. When they graduate, these students will move into various communities across this nation of approximately eleven million as well as into neighboring nations of Rwanda and Uganda. Once available on various websites and translated from English into French and Kirundi, these materials will also be accessible to other colleges and universities in Burundi as well as school systems nationally. Eventually, these materials should prove useful to faculty and school leaders around the world, especially those in areas emerging from conflict.

 

Responsibilities

Staff members and instructors at the University of Ngozi will draw from the four years of interviews, surveys, research and development that created a foundation for this work on sustainable peace and development, e.g., Timpson, Ndura, &. Bangayimbaga (2015) Conflict, reconciliation, and peace education: Moving Burundi toward a sustainable future. (New York, NY: Routledge). Testing will follow the principles laid out in ongoing research and development for case study learning as described in several published sources, e.g., Timpson, W. and D. K. Holman, Eds. (2014) Controversial Case studies for teaching on sustainability, conflict, and diversity. (Madison, WI: Atwood); Timpson, W., E. Brantmeier, N. Kees, T. Cavanagh, C. McGlynn and E. Ndura-Ouédraogo (2009) 147 practical tips for teaching peace and reconciliation. (Madison, WI: Atwood).

 

Goals

The project’s goals of supporting sustainable peace and development recognizes that without peace there will not be the foundation needed for community, economic and environmental health as reflected in the most popular definitions of sustainability. Likewise, without healthy communities, a healthy economy and a healthy land base, both cultivated and natural, the potential for peace will be uncertain. Our emphasis on training university instructors and teachers in the skills of peace-building—i.e., effective communication, cooperation, critical and creative thinking—will then be spread throughout the curriculum and across levels and disciplines as we link these to an emphasis on case-based, problem-based, and project-based learning, e.g., Timpson & Holman, Eds. (2011), Case Studies of Classrooms and Communication: Integrating Diversity, Sustainability, Peace and Reconciliation (Madison, WI: Atwood) as well as Timpson’s (2002) book, Teaching and Learning Peace (Madison, WI: Atwood). Once these materials are trialed at the University of Ngozi, they will be mounted on the University’s website for others to access in Burundi, both in higher education and local schools, as well as in neighboring countries and others world-wide who are also emerging out of conflict.

 

Evaluation

Instructors from the University of Ngozi (UNG) will be trained in case-based, problem-based, and project-based learning that emphasizes critical and creative thinking, cooperation and communication, i.e., the skills of peace-building infused into subject matter content studies. These instructors, in turn, will evaluate the impact of these reforms on their own students. These instructors will then lead efforts to train colleagues on campuses and in schools across Burundi as well as in surrounding region who come to the conferences that are hosted by this project at UNG. Instructors in the area of computer sciences will take the lead in facilitating communication about access to project materials at a distance via the University’s website.

 

January, 2017: Organize professional development conferences for instructors at all levels and across all disciplines, beginning with those at the University of Ngozi.

  • A conference on case-based learning infused with peace-building content and skills will be organized at UNG and lead by Professor Timpson.
  • Feb.-May: Subsequent conferences on case-based learning infused with peace-building content and skills will be organized and lead by instructors from UNG for instructors at other campuses as well as teachers in the region and beyond.
  • Jan.-May: Recruit instructors at the University of Ngozi in the various disciplines who would complete a second graduate online offering in the communication skills needed to support effective instruction.

Amahoro Project: Linking Sustainable Development With Restorative Educational Innovations to Prepare New Leaders to Heal and Foster Civil Society in Burundi

CSU Professor and Project Coordinator William Timpson

CSU Professor and Project Coordinator William Timpson

“Amahoro” is the Kirundi word for peace. Founded in 1999 with a commitment to peace and reconciliation, its University of Ngozi (UNG) is uniquely situated to be a laboratory for peace-building and sustainable development and the Amahoro Project hopes to help lead the way. We recognize that economic development will suffer if violence continues and that peace will be a casualty if communities remain mired in poverty.

Burundi is one of the poorest countries in the world, emerging from colonization and forty years of violence. Recent conflicts currently threaten the last eight years of stability but conditions in the region of Ngozi have remained peaceful for many years and that is one of the principle reasons why we are working there.

Those committed to this project believe that sustainable development must wed with restorative educational innovations to prepare new leaders to heal and foster civil society as basic infrastructure needs are addressed. In all our endeavors, we propose to use locally generated and regionally applicable case-based, problem-based, and project-based learning along with ideas and skills for peace building (i.e., improved communication, cooperation, conflict resolution and more) to transform surface or memorized learning into a greater emphasis on critical and creative thinking.

Over the course of this project, the UNG will be established as a viable center for research and development in sustainable peace and development. With this grant, those at the UNG can help Burundi forge (1) a recovery and rebirth of spirit, (2) reconcile wounds, differences, rivalries, prejudices, and hatreds, (3) resolve to understand the truth of the past, fix the present, and prepare for a better future; and (4) reinforce the resilience needed to rebuild an impoverished, post-colonial nation.

Images from Village Earth Global Affiliate Amahoro’s Peacbuilding Project in Burundi.

Club members #3

The leaders of our new club which is dedicated to promoting sustainable peace and development strike a pose

While the international press continues to report high levels of violence in the capitol city of Bujumbura, those who are leading our project up north in Ngozi insist that everything is peaceful. Is this more of that journalistic mantra, “if it bleeds, it leads?”

Class on Conflict Resolution #4 with glasses #1

A group of students model the sunglasses they use to “see the world differently” as peacebuilders, to see former enemies as allies.

Women with load on head passes soccer game

A woman carries a load on her head as she passes a soccer field

Village Earth Sponsors Partnership Between Ngozi University and Colorado State University.

Submitted by Dr. Apollinaire Bangayimbaga, Rector Ngozi Univeristy & William Timpson, Professor CSU.

“Amahoro” is the Kirundi word for peace. After forty years of genocide and civil war during which a large percentage of its educated citizens were targeted, exiled or killed, impoverished Burundi is now ripe to model a transformative development approach while nurturing a new generation of leaders. Founded in 1999 with a commitment to reconciliation, its University of Ngozi (UNG) is uniquely situated to be a laboratory for peace-building and sustainable development.

As a major research university, Colorado State University (CSU) has historical strengths in science, engineering, technology and mathematics (STEM education), emerging depth in the social sciences and cross cultural communication, peace education and reconciliation studies. As a land grant university, CSU also has a successful track record in extending expertise to the field, through Extension, and overseas through a wide range of public/private/NGO partnerships. Colorado State University is well positioned to serve as a partner with the University of Ngozi to mobilize resources, trial new ideas, and disseminate success stories.

Those committed to the Amahoro Project believe that development must wed with educational innovation to ready new leaders and professionals to heal and foster civil society as basic infrastructure needs are addressed. In early 2012, UNG, a co-ed, multi-faith institution with Hutu, Tutsi, and Twa students, signed an International Memorandum of Understanding (IMOU) with CSU’s School of Global Environmental Sustainability (SoGES) to pursue sustainable peace and development. CSU’s School of Education can draw on its doctoral specialization in Teaching and Learning to help build bridges between schools and universities in different regions of the world.

We need funding to support all this.

  • Build new curricula that emphasizes appropriate technology and participatory case- and project-based learning, which link communities with innovations that address basic needs of local communities.
  • Infuse UNG’s existing undergraduate disciplines—health, agriculture, communications, law, business, computer sciences—with new curricula that emphasizes content mastery and peace-building, i.e., the civic skills of effective intercultural and cross-cultural communication, consensus-building, negotiation, cooperation, conflict mitigation, critical and creative thinking.
  • With some sports equipment build on what we know about cooperative learning to create multi-tribal teams and showcase the benefits of friendly competition for unlearning hatred and prejudice.
  • With the involvement of the military in the U.S. and Burundi we could explore ways of utilizing security forces (active duty and demobilized personnel) to lead toward reconciliation.
  • With the involvement of Rotary International and their commitment to Peace and Conflict Resolution, the business community can be engaged as well.
  • Promoting community health through innovative education and social work.
  • When possible, utilize Fulbright Senior Specialist awards to support this project.

In all of these endeavors, we propose to use locally generated and regionally applicable case- and project-based learning to transform surface or memorized learning. Liberatory education is needed to aid the shift toward long-term stability and prosperity. What proves viable in Burundi, East Africa and the developing world could also have benefits for communities in the industrialized world that struggle with conflict, violence, polarization, and the costs of security. Over the course of this project, UNG will be established as a viable on-going site and dissemination center for research and development in sustainable peace and development. Leaders from around the world—in higher education, NGOs, government, business—with content expertise and peace and reconciliation experience would be invited to partner with UNG. (See Timpson, W., E. Ndura, and A. Bangayimbaga (2015) Conflict, reconciliation, and peace education: Moving Burundi toward a sustainable future. New York, NY: Routledge).

Through the fire of violence, Burundians are forging a

  • RECOVERY and REBIRTH of spirit;
  • RECONCILIATION of wounds, differences, rivalries, prejudices, and hatreds;
  • RESOLVE to understand the truth of the past, fix the present, and prepare for a better future; and
  • RESILIENCE to rebuild an impoverished, post-colonial nation and its diverse communities.

Please consider supporting the Amahoro Project. In Burundi, contact Dr. Apollinaire Bangayimbaga. In the U.S., contact Dr. William Timpson. Whatever the level of your support, together we can help build sustainable peace and development. Contributions for scholarships at the University of Ngozi should be made out to Amahoro: Village Earth. Other contributions should be made out to Amohoro: CSU Foundation.

30% Match on Donations to VE Affiliates in Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Pine Ridge, Burundi, and The Gambia

On Wednesday September 16th, starting at 9am EDT (7:00am MST), GlobalGiving.org will be matching online donations at 30% until the $70,000 in matching funds runs out. Don’t miss this opportunity to supersize your donations to eligible Village Earth Global Affiliates.

Eligible projects are listed below with links to their donation pages on Globalgiving.org.

GG1GG2GG3GG4GG5GG6GG7

The Audacity of Hope Made Real: Clean Birth Kits for the People of Burundi

Health Inst #1 Dir, Asst

By William M. Timpson – Director Amahoro Project

In rural Southern India, three million women live in poverty and lack access to a clean birth environment. Each year in India, 78,000 women die during pregnancy or childbirth and about one million neonatal deaths occur due to complications resulting from infection. To combat this problem, the social venture AYZH distributes clean birth kits called JANMA that cost just $2 each and can dramatically reduce fatal childbirth infection. These kits are sourced and assembled in India by rural women and are composed of quality, low-cost components. These kits have now been brought to Burundi, East Africa and introduced at the University of Ngozi.

In April, alumna Zubaida Bai, founder and CEO of AYZH (pronounced ‘eyes’), accepted an award on behalf of her company at the 8th Annual World Health Care Congress and WHCC Affordable Health Innovations Global Initiative Exhibit in Washington, D.C. The company distributes JANMA through an established network of local pharmacies, clinics, non-governmental organizations, and local women’s self-help groups. By setting up supply chains for local manufacturing, costs are kept low and economic opportunities are created for women in the communities they serve. Most importantly, the JANMA provide mothers a safe, clean, and hygienic delivery whether she delivers at home, at a primary health care center, or in a government hospital. The rate of maternal and infant mortality in Burundi during home deliveries is a real problem although government officials are hesitant to be very public about the exact numbers.

AYZH conducts extensive market research to assess consumer demand and then tests technologies on their affordability, appropriateness, and aesthetics to meet that demand. In addition to the JANMA birth kits, AYZH also is working to provide household water filters (called Sheba Filters) that provide high-quality drinking water at an affordable cost.

“We use a tiered approach to first address women’s basic needs. The idea is to get women and their families healthy so they have the time and strength to work. We then provide them with income generating tools to help increase their livelihood. With a healthier family and more lucrative opportunities, the women can attain a level of self-sufficiency that translates into a more vibrant society,” said Bai.

AYZH’s management is an international team passionate about making the lives of poor women better through technology and entrepreneurship. In addition to Bai, the management team at AYZH consists of alumni Habib Anwar and Kellen McMartin. All three founders of the company earned a Master’s degree in Global Social and Sustainable Enterprise from CSU’s College of Business. Hopefully this innovative idea will take hold in Burundi.

Introducing the Clean Birth Kits in the region of Ngozi makes sense since this area was a refuge when the ethnic killings were happening everywhere else in Burundi for the forty years that followed independence in 1962, beginning with the genocide of 1972 through the civil wars that erupted in the 1990’s. In Ngozi, however, Hutu and Tutsi leaders maintained the calm. They went further and created the first private university in Burundi in the wake of all that violence and dedicated to promoting peace and reconciliation. The audacity of hope made real. Accordingly, the University of Ngozi now serves as a base for curriculum reform and innovation. One such idea is this Clean Birth Kit. Introduced in the summer of 2013, staff at the University of Ngozi are exploring its use through the medical and health sciences programs.

William M. Timpson is a professor in the School of Education at Colorado State University and the author of several books on peace, reconciliation, diversity, and sustainability. He has served as Fulbright Specialist in Peace and Reconciliation Studies in Northern Ireland and Burundi, East Africa.