2016 Holiday Fundraising Campaign to Support Village Earth’s Global Affiliates

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 Global Affiliate NameGeographic FocusAbout 
Facebook-Vert-LogoVillage Earth Area of Most NeedGlobalLet Village Earth decide how best to allocate your donation.
AmahoroAmahoro ProjectBurundiAmahoro project is a collaboration betweeen Colorado State University and Ngozi University in Burundi (UNG) to establish UNG as a ongoing site and dissemination center for research in sustainable peace and development.
CRDTCambodia Rural Development Team Northeast CambodiaWorks to sustainably improve food security, incomes, and living standards of subsistence rural communities in support of environmental conservation throughout Cambodia.
Earth TipiEarth TipiPine Ridge Reservation, SDWorks to sustainably improve food security, incomes, and living standards of subsistence rural communities in support of environmental conservation throughout Cambodia.
Eco_VEco-Friendly VolunteersSri LankaECO-V is a voluntary organization engaged in environmental conservation in Sri Lanka. ECO-V has a network of 400 volunteers throughout Sri Lanka who contribute to research and community work to support conservation of the environment.
EYCEmpowering Youth CambodiaPnom Penh, CambodiaEYC is a organization working to improve the lives of young people and their families. Our vision is to see youth empowered with skills & confidence to be leaders who actively develop themselves, their families and community.
FOFCODForum for Community Change and DevelopmentSouth SudanFOFCOD envisions a new generation of productive and self-reliant south Sudanese who can ably participate in community development programs to meet their needs and those of other disadvantaged groups.
GOLDGrowing Liberia Democracy (GOLD)LiberiaGOLD promotes poverty reduction as well as democratic & high quality governance by empowering local communities to effectively engage their law makers as to make policy decisions favorable for Liberians and to be fully transparent.
ICA_NEPAlInstitute of Cultural Affairs (Nepal)NepalICA’s mission is to promote social innovation through participation and community building. We do this throughout the country through training, facilitation & development activities.  
Human-and-Hope-Association-500x500Human and Hope AssociationSiem Reap, CambodiaHuman and Hope Association works to empower Cambodians to create sustainable futures for themselves through projects focused on education, vocational training and community support.
JalambaJalamba Nursery School ProjectThe GambiaThe goal of the of the Association is to empower youths, children and vulnerable families through education. The project has government support as a new school  which will serve ages of one through six. 
JenzeraJenzeraColombiaSupports community processes so that people can freely decide on their social, political and economic lives by defending their territories, empowering their own governments and developing a self-managed economies.
KnifeChiefKnife Chief Buffalo NationPine Ridge Reservation, SDThe Knife Chief Buffalo Nation, a grassroots project on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, works to reclaim 1800 acres of ancestral lands for restoring buffalo, and Lakota culture and lifeways.
LBCCLakota Buffalo Caretakers CooperativePine Ridge Reservation, SDThe Lakota Buffalo Caretakers Cooperative (LBCC) is a 100% Native American owned and operated cooperative association on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Its membership is made up of small family buffalo caretakers who respect the buffalo and the land. Members of the LBCC are committed to the restoration of the northern plains ecology, self-sufficiency and strengthening the sovereignty and self-determination of the Oglala Lakota Nation and all indigenous peoples.
LLRPLakota Lands Recovery ProjectSouth Dakota ReservationsThe LLRP works to reclaim and consolidate tribal lands and access the resources needed for the Lakota people to live on, protect, and utilize it — promoting self-determination and sovereignty.
MalocaMalocaAmazon BasinWorks with Indigenous Peoples living in the Amazon Basin. It works directly with Indigenous leaders to raise awareness about the needs of their communities and find means to establish self-sustaining strategies to address their needs.
TasunkeWakanTasunke WakanPine Ridge Reservation, SDOur primary goal is to develop and implement Lakol Wicohan (Lakota life ways and laws, which includes language, values, beliefs, ceremonies and laws of the Lakota people) within the Oyate (Community).
TRCDATitukuke RCDAPetuake, ZambiaTRCDA is devoted to to uplifting livelihoods, reducing illiteracy, poverty and HIV/AIDS Health problems among the communities in Petauke, Zambia

Maloca Working with Kamaiura of Brazil to Mitigate Impacts of Deforestation and Climate Change

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Maloca is working with the Kamaiura to enable them to build a new village. The existing Kamaiurávillage that counts almost 300 people will split and a few families will move a new village as a measure to reduce the stress on the environment around the current Kamaiurá village, thus ensuring maintenance of livelihoods for all Kamaiurá people.
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Extreme deforestation in Mato Grosso state produced changes in the Xingu’s micro climate in the past few years: the raining season changed; rains come very late or do not come at all, affecting manioc crops, water levels (fish numbers decrease) and drying the forest (which create fierce wild fires). Manioc crops that the Kamaiura planted died three times this year leaving the Kamaiurá people on the verge of famine, with little more than water to eat for days at a time. Because of extreme dryness of the air and vegetation, wild fires burned out of control this year, engulfing swaths of forest and savannah, killing animals, destroying their habitat for years to come and reducing even more the chance of future rains. All these factors put enormous stress on the environment where the Kamaiura live and are placing at risk the Kamaiura livelihoods.
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The Kamaiurá solution
The chief of the Kamaiurá, Kotok, is very concerned about the future of his people and he decided to act: he will split his Kamaiurá village in two and open a new village where he and a few families will move. The new village will be still on  Kamaiurá  territory, where his ancestors used to live a few generations ago.
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The proceeds of the fundraiser will help but tools that the Kamaiurá have asked for in order to speed up the process of building their village and ease the hard physical work they need to put. The new village will be built according to traditional Kamaiurá architecture.
Fundraiser link (also see attached photos):
Thank you,
Luminita

Help VE Affiliate “Maloca” Support the Indigenous Kamaiura of Brazil Relocate Their Village To Mitigate Impacts of Climate Change

readytowork-2Village Earth Affiliate “Maloca” is seeking funds on the Crowdrise fundraising platform to “Help an indigenous Kamaiurá village move in order to combat climate change effects and survive“.
Please consider supporting this cause. 
The soil around the Kamaiura village suffer because of change in microclimate (dur to deforestation around Xingu Park) and a rather big Kamaiura population. The waters of the lake that feeds the Kamaiura are low and do not give enough fish (also due to changes in climate). The Kamaiura suffered from hunger this year – their manioc crops, their staple food, died three times this year. 
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The Kamaiurá have a solution
The chief of the Kamaiurá, Kotok, is very concerned about the future of his people and he decided to act: he will move from his Kamaiurá village and open a new village on a piece of land where his ancestors used o live a few generations ago. This move will reduce the stress on the environment around the current Kamaiurá village and will ensure maintenance of livelihoods for all Kamaiurá people. Splitting from the main village and creating a new one is a big deal (like splitting a country in two), but this is their own solution to ensuring the whole population will have access to enough food for the years to come.
If we get enough funds, the money will get to the Kamaiura in mid-November and they can start working on opening the new village. Spread the word, spread the love and … support the cause!
Thank you so much!
Luminita

Update on the Kamayura project in Brazil from Village Earth Global Affiliate “Maloca”

huka-huka fight closes the kuarup festivities

In 2014, at the request of the Kamayura chief, Maloca organized a successful fundraiser to buy a large fishing net. The fishing net arrived in the Kamayura village in late 2014. In the summer of 2015 I spent 2 weeks in the Kamayura village where I was able to see the fishing net being put to use.

The Kamayura were preparing for their most important ritual, kuarup, which honors the people who had passed away in the previous year. 2015 was special because the kuarup was honouring Takuman Kamayura, the chief’s father and former Kamayura chief, also the most powerful paje (healer) in Xingu. During the festivities which lasted 3 days, people from 7 neighboring villages arrived in the Kamayura village. Hundreds of guests had to be fed. For this, the Kamayura had gone fishing for one week on a lake far away in the forest. This is where they used the fishing net for the first time. This was not just any kind of fishing, but a ritual fishing, for which many preparations were made. Before setting the net into the lake, the net was blessed by the pajes. The men then fed it with manioc paste to ensure the net would catch many fish and that it would not get damaged. Everybody pushing the net was also blessed and prayed upon by the pajes; this gives them protection from injuries (by stingrays, piranha, crocodiles). The spirits of the water were appeased, the stingrays were symbolically buried (a stingray poke inflicts days of horrendous pain, fever and suffering).

Until I arrived in Xingu this small project was an administrative and awareness raising effort conducted in New York City. Only when I saw the fishing net stretched on the grass and blessed by the pajes, then stretched in the waters of  the beautiful lake with the village men lined up behind it ready to push, only then I fully felt that all the efforts of Maloca’s friends and supporters were paid off. It was an exquisite feeling of fulfilment and content of a job well done and I wished all the people who donated for this project could be there. I asked permission to take pictures so I can share that moment with all the generous supporters. And here it is – the fishing net being used in the middle of Xingu.

The Kamayura were very happy with their new net. It was not only pretty, but it had the right twine. At the end of the day, the fishermen were even happier: the net proved perfect to catch the favorite fish for the festa, the piau.

Fun fact: a couple of weeks after the Kamayura festivities, another neighbouring tribe, the Kuikuro, had their kuarup ritual. They did not have a fishing net. When they participated in the Kamayura festivities they saw the new Kamayura fishing net and borrowed it for their ritual fishing. They liked it so much they almost did not want to return it!

The net was quite successful. Now it is back into the Kamayura village, awaiting the next festival, after the rains will stop, probably late spring of this year.

VE Affiliate “Maloca” Brings Kamayurá Chief to UN to Tell of Crisis in Amazon

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Kamayurá chief tells UN of crisis in the Amazon

Chief Kotok of the Kamayurá indigenous people recently addressed the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII) and described the crisis faced by his people and other indigenous groups in the Amazonian Basin in Brazil.

“For those of you who do not know [what is happening] in the Amazon, we are in crisis,” Kotok told the forum in late April. “There is a lot of deforestation and we drink poisoned water. They’re putting poison in the water and we eat poisoned fish,” he explained.

As UNPFII Vice Chairperson Dalee Sambo Dorough explained, the cattle industry has contaminated the rivers and streams in the Upper Xingu region and dirtied the fishing grounds of the Kamayurá and other tribes. “Obviously, this has a direct impact on their economies,” she said.

“It was a very disturbing plea,” Sambo Dorough said of Kotok’s address to the UNPFII. “They need help; they are suffering,” she added.

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Kotok also said the Kamayurá and the 15 other indigenous ethnicities in the Xingu opposed any changes to the current indigenous laws in Brazil. Congress has long discussed transferring the power to demarcate indigenous lands from the executive branch to the legislature, where the agribusiness, mining and energy industries have significant lobbying power. “I don’t know how it’s going to be,” Kotok said.

Protecting the Xingu Indigenous Park

While in New York, Kotok delivered a proposal from the Associação Terra Indígena Xingu (ATIX) and approved by the Xingu chiefs to protect the Xingu Indigenous Park to the UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Brazil Permanent Mission to the UN. He also met with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Senior Policy Advisor to discuss ways to preserve the Xingu Indigenous Park.

The ATIX proposal includes the creation of a protective buffer zone around the Xingu Indigenous Park. Intensive soybean cultivation and cattle ranching in the region not only leads to increased deforestation but also pollutes the headwaters of the Xingu River through the use of fertilizers and pesticides. The Xingu River is the primary source of food and water for the Kamayurá and other tribes in the region.

Kotok also wants to clearly mark the borders of the Xingu Indigenous Park. The original markers have either collapsed or been destroyed by intruders, leaving no physical signs to denote the park’s borders. Clear signs act to keep cattle ranchers and soybean farmers out of the indigenous zone.

The Xingu Indigenous Park is the largest indigenous reserve in the world with 2.64m hectares but it is in the middle of the deforestation belt in the state of Mato Grosso.

Cultural exchange

Kotok traveled to New York as part of a joint effort between the support organization Maloca and the International Native Tradition Interchange (INTI). The environmental organization Conservation International provided a grant to fund the chief’s visit.

Kotok’s son Aira came to New York with the support of Maloca and delivered a message alongside his father at the National Museum of the American Indian on 22 April. Aira described life among the Kamayurá, including details on his training regimen for the traditional huka-huka wrestling matches that take place during the Kuarup funeral ritual every year. Kotok organized this year’s Kuarup because his father passed away last year.

Kotok and Aira enjoyed their short stay in New York. They were impressed with the tall buildings but wondered if the fish from the Hudson and East rivers were clean enough to eat. They sampled iced coffee and Buffalo wings while they were in the city but they particularly liked drinking cold water, something they do not have in the village. They did not like taking the subway because they felt stuck in a hole in the ground. They preferred taking the bus because they could take in the sights of the city. But if they felt homesick, they would spend a few minutes on the shore of the lake in Prospect Park in Brooklyn.

Village Earth Global Affiliate “Maloca” to bring Kamayura Chief to UN Permanent Forum

KThank  you to everyone who donated to Village Earth Affiliate “Maloca” so they could bring – for the first time – the Kamayura cacique (chief) Kotok from Xingu Indigenous Park in Brazil to New York. The chief will attend the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues where he will bring important messages from Xingu, will exchange experiences with other leaders and will learn first-hand about mechanisms and tools Indigenous Peoples have to defend their human rights, traditional knowledge and their territories. He will forge alliances with foundations and universities in the hope this will open doors for the Kamayura to receive much needed support .The cacique will raise awareness on the incredibly well preserved Kamayura culture and territory (which they want to keep intact for as long as they can, a most difficult job due to aggressive penetration of outside economic interest and western cultural elements).

Maloca is also honored to host a an event with the this distinguished guest April 23, 2015 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm At the National Museum of the American Indian One Bowling Green New York, NY 10004. If you are interested in attending you can purchase tickets online here.

The Kamayura are Indigenous Peoples that live in Xingu Indigenous Park, Mato Grosso state of Brazil. The region is the transition zone between the Brazilian Amazon rainforest and the savannah, an area particularly rich in biodiversity, also known for its high deforestation rates due to intense cattle ranching and soy cultivation. In 2009, the deforestation rate around the Park was 47% as per ISA (Instituto Socio Ambiental).

Xingu Indigenous Park is home to 14 different ethnicities, counting roughly 5,000 people. Chief Kotok Kamayura is the cacique of the main Kamayura village, Ipavu, where about 350 people live. The chief, having great knowledge of what is happening inside Xingu Indigenous Park, will speak about common issues to all inhabitants of the Park, showing how life in their remote villages is affected by human activities outside the Park. As cacique, he is responsible for his community and he must have a vision for their future. With all the aggressive outside influences penetrating village life, he is concerned about the future of their children and grandchildren, with their cultural survival and the integrity of their territory. The Kamayura are dependent on nature and its cycles. Their livelihoods are based on fishing and cultivating manioc. They use medicinal plants from the forest to keep a strong body and cure illnesses. The fish, manioc crops, water supply, and even medicinal plants are already affected by changes in weather patterns.  Chief Kotok will be presenting at the 14th Session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues where he will discuss these crucial issues and will forge alliances with other Indigenous leaders. As part of his first trip to New York City, he will be speaking at the National Museum of the American Indian.  Attendants will be able to meet Chief Kotok and his son Aira personally and glimpse into their captivating world. Together we will discuss pressing issues like climate change, cultural survival, the environment and possible solutions.

The Kaweshkar Inhabiting Tierra del Fuego, Chile.  The land which Ferdinad Magellan named Land of Smoke, Land of Fire is one of the most inhospitable places on the continent, where survival is hard.  With never-ending winds, cold descending to below zero , snow and the fury of the sea where throughout their lives, as lonely as the landscape, small groups of these nomads wandered searching for food and survival. Denominated as nomads, hunters and gatherers these avid canoers made their habitat in the Patagonian canals where to the present day the survivors remain.  The Kaweshkar Indigenous language remains after over 13 centuries.  During the decades of the 30’s they were abruptly hit by civilization and cultural change. Developing illnesses caused by the sudden forced change from their customary otter ski clothing to regular clothes that were not appropriate to endure the below zero temperatures causing them illness and death.  Otter skins were very much in demand in those days and hunters would kill the Kaweshkar to take the skins from their bodies.  Alcoholism was also a cause of death. .  In 2009 UNESCO declared the remaining Kaweshkar survivors as Human Living Treasures of Humanity.  Carlos Edén Maidel (Peteyem) is one of the last 9 remaining Kaweshkar.  The survivors are all pure blood Kaweshkar, all Elders (5 men and 4 women).  What will become of the last 9 remaining survivors?  Times passes and we just see them die off one by one until there will be no more – an entire Indigenous Nation extict forever.  Carlos will also attend the 14th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues to inform on current state of his nation and to seek support to produce and publish memories of his Nation.

Help Bring Kamayura Chief to UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in NYC

Maloca just launched its first fundraiser for 2015 to bring – for the first Ktime – the Kamayura cacique (chief) Kotok from Xingu Indigenous Park in Brazil to New York. The chief will attend the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues where he will bring important messages from Xingu, will exchange experiences with other leaders and will learn first-hand about mechanisms and tools Indigenous Peoples have to defend their human rights, traditional knowledge and their territories. He will forge alliances with foundations and universities in the hope this will open doors for the Kamayura to receive much needed support .The cacique will raise awareness on the incredibly well preserved Kamayura culture and territory (which they want to keep intact for as long as they can, a most difficult job due to aggressive penetration of outside economic interest and western cultural elements).

A key date is March 18th when Global Giving will match 30% the donations made that day. Here is the fundraiser link:  https://www.globalgiving.org/microprojects/bring-the-kamayura-chief-to-the-united-nations/.

If we succeed to bring the cacique in New York, Maloca will organize a series of events that will enable the chief to promote the Kamayura culture and introduce the cacique Kotok Kamayura to the international public in NYC.

We have finally received a photo of the fishing net Maloca succeeded to provide for the Kamayura.  This was a great success for Maloca and its supporters, and the Kamayura send their heartfelt thank you to everybody who made purchasing the fishing net possible.  This fishing net will not only provide food for upcoming inter-tribal festivities, but will grant the survival of several sacred rites associated with caring for and use of the net, rites in which the whole village partakes. More photos to come in the summer, when the fishing net will be used in the Kwaryp ritual!

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Update on the Work of VE Affiliate Maloca & it’s Alliance with the Kamayura People of Brazil.

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The past few months were very special and full of activity for Maloca, with a lot of work focusing on Brazil. During the summer, the director of Maloca took a trip down to Brazil, to be with the Kamayura people during one of their most important ceremonies, Kuarup, and brought them a video camera, memory cards, and a voice recorder, at their request. All the equipment has been purchased with fundraised money.
In the fall, the son of the Kamayura Cacique visited New York City, attending various events: People’s Climate March, the United Nations World Conference on Indigenous Peoples and the World Summit on Indigenous Philanthropy. This is a notable event, as it is for the first time a Kamayura travels abroad and participates in such important, global meetings. By enabling the participation of the Kamayura in these international events, and by fostering new connections between the Kamayura and the international Indigenous, activist, donor communities, we hope that we have opened a door of good opportunities for the Kamayura people.
While the son of the Cacique was in town, Maloca started a fundraiser, at the request of the Kamayura Cacique (chief), to purchase a seine fishing net for the village. Details of the current campaign and how peopel can still help, can be found here: http://malocacommunities.org/campaigns-2/current-campaign/.

Maloca – Empowering Indigenous Kamayura of Brazil to Document and Protect Culture

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Kamayura filmmakers using equipment provided by Maloca

By Luminita Cuna, Director of Maloca

In January 2014, Maloca director visited the Kamayura community in Mato Grosso state and discussed with the community the project to protect the Kamayura culture through new technology. The idea to document and record the Kamayura tradition by the Kamayura people themselves, using modern technology, existed in the village for a while, however, due to lack of resources, the Kamayura were unable to start this process. Now, your generosity will turn this community-generated idea into reality.

Everybody was excited to learn that the fundraising for the equipment started. The Kamayura identified a few people that would take a very active part in the project, once it starts, and that would carry it forward. Furthermore, we discussed creating a Kamayura Memory House (Casa das Memorias) in the village. This micro project would be an essential part in creating Casa das Memorias in the Kamayura village, a cultural point where the Kamayura traditions are collected, stored, and shared.

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One important thing that our donors need to be aware of is that the process of discussing and planning with an indigenous community is very different than what we imagine and it takes longer than one would expect. There are a lot of one-to-one discussions in informal settings ( on the way to the river, coming back from tending the manioc garden, around the fire waiting for the fish to cook). The discussions have to take place according to the community’s ways/rules, and following their own timing. These preliminary talks, which sometimes are very repetitive, have an important role, as they help interested community members to really understand how the project works (including fundraising over the internet). When people have enough information, the chief calls a general meeting in the center of the village, where facts and information is presented to everybody.

While in Brazil, Maloca contacted Brazilian film makers and identified potential candidates to visit the village to provide training (filming, editing) to the Kamayura. We are in the planning phase, both with the community and the film makers, and it looks like the summer of 2014 will be a good time to have the first training session.

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This  project will buy a good HD video camera for the Kamayura community. As prices are soaring in Brazil, the camera will be purchased in the US. The camera will be handed to the community personally by Maloca director, during the upcoming Summer 2014 trip. The months of June to September are the best for starting this project because this is the time where all the important rituals of the community take place, it is their “holiday season”.

We are continuing our efforts to raise funds to purchase external hard drives (where all the films will be stored), and hopefully another camera.

Redeem Your Globalgiving.org Gift Card to Support a Village Earth Global Affiliate

landing_bigcardsDoes your company or organization participate in Globalgiving.org’s corporate giving program? If so, we hope you’ll choose to support one of Village Earth’s Global Affiliates. Why? Because Village Earth has over 20-years of working with grassroots groups on the front-lines of social justice and sustainable development. Each one of our Global Affiliates undergoes an extensive due-diligence process and is selected because of their overall impact and focus on addressing the core issues behind poverty and powerless in their region.

Below is a list of Village Earth Affiliates with projects listed on Globalgiving.org. Click on the their image below to link to their donation page.
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Village Earth provides strategic, autonomy respecting support to 14 different grassroots organizations like the Forum for Community Change and Development (pictured above).

Village Earth provides strategic, autonomy respecting support to 14 different grassroots organizations like the Forum for Community Change and Development (pictured above)

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Use the button above to choose one of our 14 Global Affiliates or select “area of most need” and Village Earth will decide how to allocate your donation to have the greatest impact.

 

Indigenous Women’s March a Success and New Developments for Maloca

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In October, Maloca organized a successful fundraising campaign that supported more than 100 indigenous women from the Ecuadorian Amazon to walk to Quito and protest against the destruction of the rainforest by oil exploitation and against the constant violation of indigenous peoples’ human and territorial rights.

Maloca will start supporting a cultural preservation project in Brazil. This project is initiated by and will benefit the Kamayura people from Xingu Indigenous Park. The project’s aim is to provide the community with the equipment necessary to record their culture and traditions and create a digital archive of their culture, thus preserving it with the help of modern technology for future generations. By involving the youth in this project, they will learn more about their own culture and their past, they will grow to appreciate it more, and they will learn how to research and record their traditions using modern technology. The Kamayura decided this is a good way to keep, value and share their culture. This project will be a model to follow by other ethnicities living in the Xingu Indigenous Park.

This project has been accepted by Global Giving: http://www.globalgiving.org/microprojects/kamayura-jemoentap-preserving-kamayura-culture/.

70 Indigenous Women walk from the Amazon to the Andes to protest mining and oil.

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For five days, 70 indigenous women from Ecuador’s Amazon will walk from the rainforest town of Puyo to the capital Quito. Their journey will begin on October 12th. The women will walk through Shell, Rio Negro, Ambato, Banos, Latacugna, arriving in Quito on October 17th. These determined women, from the Zapara, Waorani, Shwar, Achuar, and Kichua nations, will walk 240 kilometers, from the Amazon lowlands to 9,350 feet high in the Andes.

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These women will walk to Quito to protest against oil, mining and other destructive projects currently under development on their territory, to demand that their human rights be respected, including the right to free, prior and informed consent . Extractive industry projects affect the rainforest, on which the livelihoods of these women depends. They find themselves unable to feed their family by cultivating contaminated land or by having their land taken away. Most projects ignore indigenous women’s rights to participation and their voice is not heard. Extractive activities divide communities and weaken their social structure making them more vulnerable, while destroying the environment on which communities depend for survival.They will demand from the government to respect their rights, their territories and to consider the “life plans” (Planes de Vida) that their communities have developed in a collaborative way.

On October 10 and 11, Shwar, Huaorani, Zapara, Achuar, Kichwa women will participate in Puyo in a general meeting “Mujeres en Vigila por la Vida” (Women Protecting Life), followed by the walk to Quito.

What these women need is logistical support for the walk: money for food and lodging along the 5 day walk. These women have the ideas, the courage and their fight, however they lack resources.

Let’s help these women get to Quito and enable them to make their voice heard. Let’s be with them every kilometer along the way, let’s feed them and let’s get them a place to sleep, this way we will enable them to defend their territory, rights and future.

Follow the Women’s Walk on Maloca’s website: http://malocacommunities.org/

– See more at: http://www.crowdrise.com/WomenMarchtoQuito/fundraiser/consortiumforsustain#sthash.e0bjwcxi.dpuf

Maloca Forges New Partnerships in Brazil

During a trip to Brazil in the summer of 2013 Maloca consolidated relations with an indigenous community in Xingu, in the state of Mato Grosso. Discussions with community members and leaders revealed areas of various future collaborations between Maloca and the community, like cultural preservation, food security, and education.

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Kari-Oca II, the Indigenous People’s Conference at Rio +20

Written by Luminita Cuna, director of Maloca, who participated in the Kari-Oca II conference.

The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, popularly known as Rio +20, was one of the major international events of 2012. Over 100 Heads of States and Governments along with 45,000 participants attended this event which was supposed to nail an agreement on “the future we want” (the motto of the conference). The conference created big hopes and delivered very little, as opposed to Rio 92 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development where important and policy-changing agreements were drafted and signed.

Civil society had a strong participation in Rio+20, and one special event part of the UNCSD was the World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Territories, Rights and Sustainable Development, also known as Kari-Oca II. This conference was organized by the Inter Tribal Committee of Brazil (Comitê Intertribal de Memória e Ciência Indígena) with the help and support of other organizations and agencies. The event welcomed more than 400 Indigenous Peoples from all over the world. Its precursor was the Kari-Oca I conference, which took place in 1992, at the Earth Summit in Rio (UNCED).

Kari-Oca II took place June 13-22 in Rio de Janeiro. The 10 days were filled with activities from morning till night: meetings of the Indigenous Peoples where pressing issues were discussed, from the Belo Monte dam, to carbon credits and land grabs. There were daily work sessions to draft the declaration that would be the outcome of the conference, trips to the People’s Summit for Social and Environmental Justice during Rio+20, and the “Green Games”: cultural demonstrations and sports competitions open to the general public, in an effort to familiarize as many people as possible with the richness and beauty of indigenous cultures in across the globe.

The venue of Kari-Oca II was the “Kari-Oca village”, located on the Fiorcruz campus in the north-western part of Rio, the same sit of the Kari-Oca I conference. Some of the participants were leaders and organizers of the Kari-Oca I conference, 20 years ago. About 20 members of the Kamayura people arrived from their home in Xingu 2 weeks earlier to build two traditional ocas (longhouses) next to the arena where the Green Games unfolded. An electronic longhouse (Oca Electronica) was equipped with computers and internet connection and kept all participants linked to the rest of the world. On the main front patio, a beautiful Oca da Sabeduria (Wisdom Longhouse) held daily debates on environment, rights of indigenous peoples and Mother Earth, and other ardent issues. The Kari-Oca village was visited by government officials, and other important figures, some of the most notable ones being chief Raoni, and the princess of Kuwait. Indigenous People from Brazil that attended Kari-Oca took 3 or 4-day trips by boat, by truck, by bus, to join hundreds of their brothers and sisters from abroad. The Kari-Oca Caravan brought 54 leaders from Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador who travelled 9 days by bus across 5 countries, to join forces with Kari-Oca II participants.

The event was opened by a spiritual ceremony and the lighting up of the sacred fire, and it culminated with the signing of Kari-Oca II Declaration (read it here), followed by an impressive march of more than 400 indigenous people to Rio+20 site. Marcos Terena, one of the organizers and a prominent indigenous leader, walked into the Rio+20 conference and delivered the declaration to the UN Director for Sustainable Development Nikhil Seth, and Gilberto Carvalho, the Chief Minister to the Presidency of Brazil. The Declaration contains the Indigenous Peoples demands and recommendations for sustainable development and protection of the environment. It criticizes the “green economy” promoted strongly at Rio+20, stating that Indigenous Peoples are against the commodifying of nature, calling it the “capitalism of nature”. It decries the violation of the Indigenous Peoples rights to self determination, land, territories, resources, and to self-determined development. It criticizes unsustainable agricultural projects (chemically treated soya plantations), big infrastructure projects (hydroelectric dams), extractive industries , all which are a threat to the lives and livelihoods of Indigenous Peoples by poisoning and destroying their lands, besides contributing to climate change. The declaration demands respect for and protection of Mother Earth, lamenting the “continued economic colonization and degradation of Mother Earth and all life upon her”. It asks the UN and governments to stop looking for false solutions which will only further destroy Mother Earth, and demands the participation of Indigenous Peoples in decision making processes and the respect of their right to free prior and informed consent.

The event showed the important role that Indigenous People play in the big picture of sustainable development, demonstrated their capabilities of organizing themselves and delivering solutions to acute environmental, social and economic problems the world is facing right now.

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