Village Earth Global Affiliate “Maloca” to bring Kamayura Chief to UN Permanent Forum

KThank  you to everyone who donated to Village Earth Affiliate “Maloca” so they could bring – for the first time – the Kamayura cacique (chief) Kotok from Xingu Indigenous Park in Brazil to New York. The chief will attend the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues where he will bring important messages from Xingu, will exchange experiences with other leaders and will learn first-hand about mechanisms and tools Indigenous Peoples have to defend their human rights, traditional knowledge and their territories. He will forge alliances with foundations and universities in the hope this will open doors for the Kamayura to receive much needed support .The cacique will raise awareness on the incredibly well preserved Kamayura culture and territory (which they want to keep intact for as long as they can, a most difficult job due to aggressive penetration of outside economic interest and western cultural elements).

Maloca is also honored to host a an event with the this distinguished guest April 23, 2015 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm At the National Museum of the American Indian One Bowling Green New York, NY 10004. If you are interested in attending you can purchase tickets online here.

The Kamayura are Indigenous Peoples that live in Xingu Indigenous Park, Mato Grosso state of Brazil. The region is the transition zone between the Brazilian Amazon rainforest and the savannah, an area particularly rich in biodiversity, also known for its high deforestation rates due to intense cattle ranching and soy cultivation. In 2009, the deforestation rate around the Park was 47% as per ISA (Instituto Socio Ambiental).

Xingu Indigenous Park is home to 14 different ethnicities, counting roughly 5,000 people. Chief Kotok Kamayura is the cacique of the main Kamayura village, Ipavu, where about 350 people live. The chief, having great knowledge of what is happening inside Xingu Indigenous Park, will speak about common issues to all inhabitants of the Park, showing how life in their remote villages is affected by human activities outside the Park. As cacique, he is responsible for his community and he must have a vision for their future. With all the aggressive outside influences penetrating village life, he is concerned about the future of their children and grandchildren, with their cultural survival and the integrity of their territory. The Kamayura are dependent on nature and its cycles. Their livelihoods are based on fishing and cultivating manioc. They use medicinal plants from the forest to keep a strong body and cure illnesses. The fish, manioc crops, water supply, and even medicinal plants are already affected by changes in weather patterns.  Chief Kotok will be presenting at the 14th Session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues where he will discuss these crucial issues and will forge alliances with other Indigenous leaders. As part of his first trip to New York City, he will be speaking at the National Museum of the American Indian.  Attendants will be able to meet Chief Kotok and his son Aira personally and glimpse into their captivating world. Together we will discuss pressing issues like climate change, cultural survival, the environment and possible solutions.

The Kaweshkar Inhabiting Tierra del Fuego, Chile.  The land which Ferdinad Magellan named Land of Smoke, Land of Fire is one of the most inhospitable places on the continent, where survival is hard.  With never-ending winds, cold descending to below zero , snow and the fury of the sea where throughout their lives, as lonely as the landscape, small groups of these nomads wandered searching for food and survival. Denominated as nomads, hunters and gatherers these avid canoers made their habitat in the Patagonian canals where to the present day the survivors remain.  The Kaweshkar Indigenous language remains after over 13 centuries.  During the decades of the 30’s they were abruptly hit by civilization and cultural change. Developing illnesses caused by the sudden forced change from their customary otter ski clothing to regular clothes that were not appropriate to endure the below zero temperatures causing them illness and death.  Otter skins were very much in demand in those days and hunters would kill the Kaweshkar to take the skins from their bodies.  Alcoholism was also a cause of death. .  In 2009 UNESCO declared the remaining Kaweshkar survivors as Human Living Treasures of Humanity.  Carlos Edén Maidel (Peteyem) is one of the last 9 remaining Kaweshkar.  The survivors are all pure blood Kaweshkar, all Elders (5 men and 4 women).  What will become of the last 9 remaining survivors?  Times passes and we just see them die off one by one until there will be no more – an entire Indigenous Nation extict forever.  Carlos will also attend the 14th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues to inform on current state of his nation and to seek support to produce and publish memories of his Nation.

Teca Woasniye Wicoti (Youth Healing Camp) on The Pine Ridge Reservation a Success!

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Porcupine, SD- On a cold February morning three grassroots organizations met on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to discuss the five completed suicides and how they could intervene; participating in this meeting were Mila Yatan Pika Pte Oyate Okolakiciye (Knife Chief Buffalo Nation Society), Tasunke Wakan Okolakiciye (Medicine Horse Society) and Oaye Luta Okolakiciye (Red Journey Society). Through the course of this meeting it quickly became apparent that with each program there had an intense desire and need to help the youth and their families suffering from the impact of this epidemic.

Tiospaye Sakowin Wounspe na Woapiye O’Tipi (Seven Extended Families Education and Healing Center) was born and a strategic plan developed to continue to provide healing services to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. These organizations are the first of seven families to align in this effort to promote Lakota Cultural Healing and Education and they were quickly joined by Sung Nagi Okolakiciye (Spirit Horse Society) from Manderson, SD. Since the centers inception on February 15, there have been four additional completed suicides bringing the total to nine completed suicides.

First thing on the agenda? Provide a culturally relevant way for individuals in the helping field to assist and address the suicide issue on the Pine Ridge Indian reservation. On March 26 and 27th Tiospaye Sakowin hosted “Lakota Mental Health First Aid Training” facilitated by Richard and Ethleen (Iron Cloud) Two Dogs. This training provided the participants with the opportunity to understand the spiritual growth of individuals from their time of birth until their passing and what happens when this natural growth is interrupted through unnatural sources such as abuse (of all kinds), violence, accidents and suicidal ideation and completion.

The presenters, board members of the collaborating societies, shared their insight and knowledge into the cultural perspective on indigenous healing. To a room of thirty plus participants, Mr. and Mrs. Two Dogs shared their knowledge through integrating the Lakota Customary, Natural, and Spiritual laws within the educational process, and to revitalize and implement the Lakota interventions through education and practice.

Participants in the training ranged from youth to elderly; from as far away as Standing Rock Indian Reservation and as close as Porcupine and Manderson. A surprise visit from Oglala Lakota Nation Tribal President John Steele highlighted the day’s events when he acknowledged the work being completed within the center and thanked all the participants in their vested interest in the epidemic.

Collectively this program and its partnering societies provide a foundation of 20 plus years working with Lakota elders and traditional healers to revitalize and strengthen the Lakota life ways and laws through education, healing and collaboration. Their primary programmatic focus is to empower the Lakota Tiwahe (families) in reclaiming their Lakota identity. Each of these organizations provides a unique attribute that provides healing and empowerment services to the Lakota Oyate. With room to grow, Tiospaye Sakowin will partner with seven organizations with like minds, missions and philosophy to strengthen and expand the impact of indigenous services.

During the Easter holiday weekend this Lakota community-based organization, hosted a healing opportunity for our youth through a Teca Woasniye Wicoti (Youth Healing Camp) on April 2-6, 2015. Through this camp, learning, recreational and healing activities were offered to twenty six participating youth. Through this healing opportunity, as a way to give life to the values, gifts and teachings provided by Tunkasila (Grandfather/Creator) for the healing of the youth that were incorporated into the facilitation of programming. They included: Wacante Ognaka—to have a warm, compassionate environment for youth; Woapiye –traditional healing for their spiritual wounds from the trauma, grief or loss; Wopakinte—spiritual purification from the negative residue left by any trauma; Woyuskin—to provide a happy, fun and accepting environment; Lakol Caswicatun Pi – to provide an opportunity for those youth who do not have a spirit name to receive one as a way to reinforce their Lakota cultural identity; Wicozani—to provide an opportunity for wellness screenings and Wowasake—to provide an opportunity to achieve resiliency.

In recent years these collaborating organizations worked with community leaders, families and Lakota Oyate to provide healing opportunities to over sixty youth per annum in a series of youth camps based on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. These sixty youth reflect those young people who have addressed their unresolved trauma and emotional issues during these camps, then continue throughout life better equipped to address other issues. With financial support from local, state and Tribal organizations these camps are uniquely designed to address specific needs of the age and gender of the participating youth.

At conception, Teca Woasniye Wicoti was designed to service 24 Native American youth (12 males and 12 females) ages 12-17, who have experienced trauma, loss and/ or grief. Registration for the camp was closed on March 27th with 26 females and 13 males registered with continuing requests from the community for exceptions to the deadline so that more youth may attend; 26 youth completed the program.  Ethleen Iron Cloud-Two Dogs, Camp Lead on this project stated, “All registrations will be accepted, no one will be turned away.” She continues to say, “As adult relatives, we seek to instill in our youth the Lakota belief that every individual has a purpose on earth and that resiliency to confront life’s challenges can be achieved.”

Teca Woasniye Wicoti was set up to mirror a Tiospaye (extended family) governing which allows for all to work together. The youth of the camp engaged and participated in gender appropriate teachings and ceremonies. Each of the activities and ceremonies engaged the youth at different levels and allow them to work together in their healing experience, thus creating a small community approach. “There are so many people who came together to make this happen for our youth,” Cindy Giago, volunteer Program Manager for Tiospaye Sakowin states, “so many that it would be hard to name each person in one setting but there are those that go above and beyond to make things like this happen; like my brother and sister-in-law, my nephews, nieces and my daughter-in-laws that never back down from a good battle.”  Mrs. Giago goes on to state that the Tunkasila and the Unci (the ancestors) provide the most important and significant guidance through prayer and the Societies are blessed with the earthly spiritual guidance of her Tiblo (older brother) Richard Two Dogs, a Lakota Medicine Man.

Youth participant qualifications included being members of or have tribal ties to the Dakota, Lakota and Nakota Sioux nations as the camp’s foundation is based on Lakota Life Ways, culture and most importantly spirituality. Participants are between the ages of 10-17 years of age who would benefit from attending and receiving interventions designed to prevent progression of symptoms of depression, which could eventually lead to suicidal ideations.   In the end the camp effort is hosted over 75 participants who include the youth, their families, volunteers, mentors, spiritual leaders and security. Many local programs, schools and organizations supported the youth at the camp, as well as many individual donors nation-wide. Donations included clothing, food, supplies as well as monetary donations.

Tiospaye Sakowin Education and Healing Center will be hosting additional Camps this summer which include the Teca Woasniye Wicoti (Youth Healing Camp) that happened in April, Wakanyeja Wicoti (Children’s Camp) in July, Wikoskalaka Yuwita Pi (Lakota Gathering of Young Women) in August and the Lakota Koskalaka Wica Yuwita Pi (Lakota Young Men’s Gathering) times two in June and November 2015. As this organization depends greatly on charitable donations from well-meaning companies here in the United States; they ask you to please consider donating to their organization as you will be eligible for a charitable contribution for donating to a registered 501c3 organization. Please visit www.villageearth.org for more information or email: [email protected] The center invites you to be one of their partners in the successful implementation of these programs that will address the needs of the Pine Ridge Indian reservation in a much more in a culturally appropriate, positive and healing perspective.

Learn About Utah Tar Sands Resistance – April 22nd at the Fort Collins Old Town Library.

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Join Village Earth and 350 Ft. Collins, a local affiliate of 350.org, April 22 at the Old Town Library at 6:30 PM for a screening of “Last Rush for the Wild West” a documentary about the tar sands mine currently under construction on the Tavaputs Plateau in Utah, part of it is on Uintah Ute tribal land, so there are several indigenous groups involved opposing the mine. In June 2014, the EPA told U.S. Oil Sands that it needed additional permitting to proceed because its mine sits on traditional Uintah and Ouray Ute tribal land. They continued operations without the permitting.

Melanie Martin, who organizes with Peaceful Uprising and Utah Tar Sands Resistance, we be speaking and answering questions following the screening. Last year she spent her summer and fall on the East Tavaputs Plateau working to halt the first potential fuel-producing tar sands mine in the U.S. She writes on climate justice issues for a range of publications such as Yes!, Waging Nonviolence, and Truthout, creates short film pieces, and makes a pretty badass chipmunk mask.

Medical Services Provided by VE Global Affiliate, Empowering Youth Cambodia

Providing healthcare to urban slum area residents

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Empowering Youth in Cambodia (EYC) provides weekly medical clinics in their four schools, as well as dental care and health education.  The program has been a tremendous success and the results from 2014 are substantial; 3,200 patient-doctor visits (medical checks are open to the community), 320 student-visits to the dentist, 130 women and 1 man provided access to family planning.  Further, EYC staff and partners follow up with patients as needed to ensure their health needs are addressed, particularly with their students.

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Student Srey, 17 years old, had significant acne problems due to an allergic reaction after receiving a prescription from an unqualified, low-cost doctor that her mother took her to.

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Srey is a young leader in EYC who excels in her academics both in public school and English classes in EYC. After her family was evicted from their house three years ago she moved into an EYC school and volunteers with several programs including teaching traditional dance to children.

 

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Another student, Srey, 15 years old, had a visibly disturbing issue of no front teeth. The staff of EYC recognized the issue and EYC’s social worker discussed treatment with her and her family.

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She needed six new teeth and the family was able to pay for half of the cost.

 

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The new teeth came in very nicely and she now smiles brightly and is confident to talk to people

She would like to say “thanks to EYC donors to help with the payment and for bringing me to fix my teeth. My life is much better now.”   The combination of poor hygiene and diet (low nutrition levels + plenty of sugary foods) have created a dental crisis for many young people in urban poor areas of Cambodia.

A very appreciative beneficiary is Khon Sophat, a 28 year old former factory worker who is currently a mother of four.  Her husband is a motor taxi driver and they rent a small rent house for $10 per month. Their children are ages 6, 4, 2 and 4 months. EYC’s social worker Koun Lyna was referred to her and after providing education to her on her birth control options, brought her to see the doctor at Maries Stopes clinic where she got an IUD.  Lyna said “she is very happy to get an IUD. It’s really helpful to her and her family as she now has time to look after the family and the expenses of four young children also.”  Lyna is an ongoing resource if needed.

New Photos from Village Earth Global Affiliate SGDI – West Bengal, India

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International Women’s Day Rally

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International Women’s Day Rally

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community well for drinking water



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International women day celebration

 

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Annual SHG conference and financial literacy awareness.

 

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Micro enterprise by tribal women -part of SHG economic activities in Purulia.

 

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Micro enterprise by tribal youth through livelihood initiative ( part of social protection of tribal ). Its an initiative to main stream tribal youths to engage in economic ventures.

 

Help Bring Kamayura Chief to UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in NYC

Maloca just launched its first fundraiser for 2015 to bring – for the first Ktime – the Kamayura cacique (chief) Kotok from Xingu Indigenous Park in Brazil to New York. The chief will attend the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues where he will bring important messages from Xingu, will exchange experiences with other leaders and will learn first-hand about mechanisms and tools Indigenous Peoples have to defend their human rights, traditional knowledge and their territories. He will forge alliances with foundations and universities in the hope this will open doors for the Kamayura to receive much needed support .The cacique will raise awareness on the incredibly well preserved Kamayura culture and territory (which they want to keep intact for as long as they can, a most difficult job due to aggressive penetration of outside economic interest and western cultural elements).

A key date is March 18th when Global Giving will match 30% the donations made that day. Here is the fundraiser link:  https://www.globalgiving.org/microprojects/bring-the-kamayura-chief-to-the-united-nations/.

If we succeed to bring the cacique in New York, Maloca will organize a series of events that will enable the chief to promote the Kamayura culture and introduce the cacique Kotok Kamayura to the international public in NYC.

We have finally received a photo of the fishing net Maloca succeeded to provide for the Kamayura.  This was a great success for Maloca and its supporters, and the Kamayura send their heartfelt thank you to everybody who made purchasing the fishing net possible.  This fishing net will not only provide food for upcoming inter-tribal festivities, but will grant the survival of several sacred rites associated with caring for and use of the net, rites in which the whole village partakes. More photos to come in the summer, when the fishing net will be used in the Kwaryp ritual!

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How Sustainable Land-Based Economic Development Promotes Tribal Sovereignty and Self-Determination

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Support this project at https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/acquire-lands-for-lakota-cultural-and-bison-camp/x/9855461#home

Believe it or not, land is one of the most underutilized resources available to Plains Indian Tribes and Tribal members. And unlike other sources of income, sustainable land utilization can bolster Tribal sovereignty, self-determination and cultural revitalization. Consider these statistics, according to the Indian Land Working Group, 6 of the 9 million acres of Indian Lands suitable for agriculture in the United States are leased to non-native and consequently, non-natives collect 92% of all agricultural income generated on these lands.

The leasing of Indian Lands by the Federal Government dates back the the the Act of February 28, 1891 which amended the General Allotment Act to give the Secretary of the Interior the power to determine whether an Indian allottee had the “mental or physically qualifications” to enable him to cultivate his allotment. In such cases, the Superintendent was authorized to lease their lands to non-tribal members. In 1894, the annual Indian Appropriation Act increased the agricultural lease term to 5 years, 10 years for business and mining leases, and permitted forced leases for allottees who “suffered” from “inability to work their land,” and dramatically increased the number of leases issued across the country (Source:LLRP).

These policies have meant that the Indian landowners across the country have been separated from their allotted lands, in many cases, for generations. In fact, many Tribal land owners know very little about their lands; where they are located, how they are being used, who they share ownership with, etc. This has had devastating impacts on the ability of landowners to manage and benefit from their land-based resources – economically or culturally.

Since 2003 the Lakota Lands Recovery Project has been providing direct support support to individual American Indians seeking utilize their lands. The most recent effort is a project initiated by Edward Iron Cloud III on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Mr. Iron Cloud seeks to acquire a lease to 1500 acres of land on the Reservation to establish a cultural camp for native youth and a campsite for tourists and different organizations visiting the Reservation. The lease for this land is only $8000 per year so by being creative and developing revenue streams from the land, like tourism, that do not require a lot of start-up capital, he can transform this land into something that more directly benefits his family and his community. Of course, the emergence of crowdfunding sites like Indiegogo.com and Kickstarter.com as well as online “reservation” services like AirBnb.com, Homeaway.com, VRBL.com, etc open up new possibilities for non-agriculture based enterprises on Reservation lands.

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Some of these sustainable low-capital enterprises viable on a reservation setting might include.

  • Renting campsites using online booking services like AirBnb
  • Horseback riding
  • Hunting
  • Fishing
  • Birdwatching
  • Collecting wild plants
  • Making land available to groups for camps, ecological research projects, etc.

Unlike conventional agriculture, enterprises like the ones listed have a greater multiplier effect (keeping dollars changing hands locally) in their communities by creating more local jobs and benefiting the entire support economy by increasing patronage at local gas stations, restaurants, hotels, supermarkets, etc.

If you’re interested in utilizing land on your reservation, contact David Bartecchi at [email protected]

Need a Last Minute Gift Idea? Send a Donation Gift Card that Benefits Village Earth

Need a unique last minute gift idea? This year, make a donation in honor of your friend, relative, coworker, neighbor etc. and they’ll receive an attractive custom printed gift card. You can choose to have Globalgiving.org mail a high quality paper card or you can print or email it for no additional charge.

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To give a gift card, simply choose the “Gift or In-Honor Of” tab below the donate button on any of Village Earth’s projects pages on Globalgiving.org (see list below).

 

GiftCardDonate

Choose your method of delivery and amount and then you can choose one of three card design options.

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Below is a list of Village Earth’s projects listed on Globalgiving.org.

MniGGLLRPGGGeneralGG SGDIGG TitukukeGG KnifeChiefGG EarthTIpiGG DinehGG MalocaGG LivingRootsGG

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Village Earth Honors International Human Rights Day, Wednesday Dec. 12th, 2014.

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The UN General Assembly proclaimed 10 December as Human Rights Day in 1950, to bring to the attention ‘of the peoples of the world’ the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as the common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations.

Today, Village Earth honors International Human Rights Day with a reaffirmation of our commitment to the defense and protection of the rights endowed in Humans and all living creators. A human rights-based approach is at the core of what we do. This means doing more than making an bad situation a little better or helping people do more with less. Instead, it means engaging with community in a dialogue about the root causes of poverty and oppression and working side-by-side to transform them.  Furthermore, this approach, this philosophy, recognizes the importance of local leaders and their organizations as the primary actors in change, rather than outside NGOs, academics, or experts. We believe a human rights-based approach must also consider justice, the intergenerational impacts of oppression (both material and psychological), and the necessity for governments, corporations and individuals to adequately and respectfully remedy past wrongs.

Read more about Village Earth’s Approach.

Order Tanka Bar and Support Lakota Bison Restoration and Land Recovery Efforts

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This Holiday Season, give the gift the healthy, delicious buffalo meat products produced by Native American Natural Foods, a 100% Native American owned and operated business based on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Even better, 20%  of each order will support Lakota Bison Restoration and Land Recovery/Restoration Efforts. 

All Tanka Products are 100% Natural, never use Preservatives, Erythorbates, Potassium Sorbate, Fillers, or Artificial Flavors. They are Certified Gluten-Free by the Gluten Free Certification Organization (GFCO). They are also Soy-Free, and contain NO Hormones or Antibiotics, and NO MSG. There are NO added Nitrites or Nitrates. Our products are packed full of Energy. At Native American Natural Foods, we follow the stringent Whole Foods product approval list.

Use the links below to order online at Native American Natural Foods. We’ll receive 20% of anything you order from their site.

 

 

TANKA BAR

GLUTEN-FREE * NITRATES-FREE * MSG-FREE * HORMONE-FREE

Made from tart-sweet cranberries and prairie-raised buffalo, the Tanka Bar is a delicious real food bar with a smoky, slightly-sweet flavor.

100% Natural and only 70-calories, Tanka Bars are the perfect food for anyone who’s on the go — athletes, outdoor enthusiasts, students, busy moms, and pow-wow dancers. Gluten-free, hormone-free and low-fat, the Tanka Bars are deliciously perfect for every diet lifestyle. Tanka Bars are guaranteed shelf-stable for up to 12 months.

There are three delicious flavors to choose from:

  • APPLE ORANGE PEEL
  • SLOW SMOKED ORIGINAL
  • SPICY PEPPER

 

TANKA BITES

GLUTEN-FREE * NITRATES-FREE * MSG-FREE * HORMONE-FREE

With the same great taste and amazing nutrition as the Tanka Bars, our Tanka Bites feature 3 ounces of bite-size buffalo and cranberry nuggets in a resealable package.

Tanka Bites are the perfect way to enjoy Tanka’s grass-fed bison goodness with your family and friends. Since the Bites come in 3-oz. pouches, you don’t have to hoard your Bison anymore.

There are three delicious flavors to choose from:

  • APPLE ORANGE PEEL
  • SLOW SMOKED ORIGINAL
  • SPICY PEPPER

Like the bars, Tanka Bites are also 100% Natural, 70 calories per serving, low-fat, gluten-free and hormone-free. Throw some in your purse, backpack or your saddlebag to enjoy on the trail. Tanka Bites are guaranteed shelf-stable for up to 12 months.

TANKA STICKS

GLUTEN-FREE * NITRATES-FREE * MSG-FREE * HORMONE-FREE

A great alternative to the usual processed sticks, Tanka Sticks combine the goodness of prairie-raised Buffalo and tart-sweet Cranberries in a convenient, eat-as-you-go snack stick.

Perfect for a quick, healthy pick-me-up, the 1-ounce Tanka Sticks come in three great flavors:

  • APPLE ORANGE PEEL
  • SLOW SMOKED ORIGINAL
  • SPICY PEPPER

Tanka Wild Gourmet Summer Sausage: In addition to our great Sticks, this recipe is also available as a Gourmet Summer Sausage. Tender and savory, this perfectly seasoned sausage also features the delicious combination of Buffalo, Cranberries and Wild Rice. Available in Original flavor only.

Tanka Sticks and Gourmet Summer Sausages are 100% Natural, low-fat, gluten-free and hormone-free and guaranteed shelf-stable for up to 12 months.

TANKA ONNIT WARRIOR BAR

GLUTEN-FREE * NITRATES-FREE * MSG-FREE * HORMONE-FREE

Made from tart-sweet cranberries, jalapeno and habanero peppers, and prairie-raised buffalo, the Tanka Onnit Warrior is a delicious 2-ounce real food bar with 14 grams of protein and 140 calories.

Perfect as a “recovery food” for high-performance athletes, Tanka Onnit Warrior Bars are gluten-free, hormone-free and low-fat. They are guaranteed shelf-stable for up to 12 months.

 

 

TANKA GOURMET BUFFALO JERKY

GLUTEN-FREE * NITRATES-FREE * MSG-FREE * HORMONE-FREE

Created because YOU asked for it, our Tanka Gourmet Buffalo Cranberry Jerky is deliciously meaty, wholly satisfying and 100 percent natural.

Made from top premium whole-muscle cuts, we slow-cure each slice of our tender Gourmet Buffalo Jerky in real cranberries, with no artificial ingredients. This is simply the best buffalo jerky you will ever taste.

Tanka Gourmet Buffalo Jerky is guaranteed shelf-stable for up to 12 months.

TANKA GIFTS

GLUTEN-FREE * NITRATES-FREE * MSG-FREE * HORMONE-FREE

We’re happy to introduce our new selection of Tanka Gifts, perfect for any special occasion. Choose from a seasonally available assortment of gift baskets, each filled with a carefully chosen selection of healthy Tanka products that are perfect to share with family, friends and co-workers.

Smoky and slightly sweet, Tanka Bars, Tanka Bites, and Tanka Sticks are made from tart-sweet cranberries and prairie-raised buffalo. All are 100% Natural and only 70-calories per serving. Gluten-free, hormone-free and low-fat, Tanka products are deliciously perfect for every lifestyle.

Seasonally available in a range of sizes, Tanka gift baskets are right for holidays, birthdays, anniversaries or just to make someone smile.

NOTE: Not all gift baskets are available year-round.

Help Village Earth Raise $45,000 for Grassroots Organizations Around the Globe

Contribution

From day one, Village Earth has been focused on the singular question of “How do we support communities to mobilize and work towards their vision for the future without creating dependence or undermining their own best efforts?”  Village Earth’s Global Affiliate Program, started in 2011, is our answer to this question.

The Global Affiliate Program was founded on the belief that local community organizations or groups can best identify their own needs and aspirations. It works by providing a support structure that enables community groups to access information and to find the resources they need to enhance or expand what they are already doing, or would like to do in a sustainable future as they envision it.We are proud to partner with such groups as:

  • Empowering Youth Cambodia: working with the next generation of youth leaders living in Cambodia’s over-crowded urban slums;
  • Forum for Community Change and Development in South Sudan: advancing the rights of women in a country in deep conflict;
  • Jenzera: working to protect the rights and territories of indigenous and ethnic minorities in Colombia.

These are just three of the 17 different grassroots organizations that are part of our Global Affiliate Program.

Below is how one Global Affiliate describes the support we provide:

1185047_524887214257669_1026588554_nThe Knife Chief Buffalo Nation Organization, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD.“Knife Chief Buffalo Nation, a grassroots organization on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, raises buffalo and provides for their care as they provide spiritual and physical nourishment for the Lakota people.  The buffalo are central to the Lakota spiritual way of life and we are honored to do this work although it is often very challenging to obtain resources for all that is needed to be done.  Village Earth helps Knife Chief Buffalo Nation to meet these challenges by providing technical assistance, fiscal accountability and support for our work.  We are fortunate to have such an organization to partner with!”– Ethleen Iron Cloud Two Dogs, Board Member of Knife Chief Buffalo Nation Organization
Last year, with your support, Village Earth distributed over $75,000 in flexible micro-grants to support community-driven development projects including:
  • Providing computer training for 120 Cambodian youth.
  • Training Lakota youth in sustainable home building on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation
  • Providing human rights training to women in South Sudan.
  • See insert for more about each Global Affiliate and their projects.

This year, we are excited to build on the success of our Global Affiliate Program (now in its 3rd year) by enhancing our support for our existing Global Affiliates through expanded outreach and training opportunities while opening the program up to more organizations.  In fact, we are currently reviewing applications  from organizations in Senegal, Liberia, and Cambodia—all of which look very promising.

If you are already a supporter of Village Earth, we encourage you to renew your commitment now.  If you are new, we welcome you to our growing network of grassroots organizations and allies!

 

 Choose to donate to one of our
Global Affiliates 
below
or
use the
button to the right to let Village Earth
decide 
how best to utilize your donation. 

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Update on the Work of VE Affiliate Maloca & it’s Alliance with the Kamayura People of Brazil.

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The past few months were very special and full of activity for Maloca, with a lot of work focusing on Brazil. During the summer, the director of Maloca took a trip down to Brazil, to be with the Kamayura people during one of their most important ceremonies, Kuarup, and brought them a video camera, memory cards, and a voice recorder, at their request. All the equipment has been purchased with fundraised money.
In the fall, the son of the Kamayura Cacique visited New York City, attending various events: People’s Climate March, the United Nations World Conference on Indigenous Peoples and the World Summit on Indigenous Philanthropy. This is a notable event, as it is for the first time a Kamayura travels abroad and participates in such important, global meetings. By enabling the participation of the Kamayura in these international events, and by fostering new connections between the Kamayura and the international Indigenous, activist, donor communities, we hope that we have opened a door of good opportunities for the Kamayura people.
While the son of the Cacique was in town, Maloca started a fundraiser, at the request of the Kamayura Cacique (chief), to purchase a seine fishing net for the village. Details of the current campaign and how peopel can still help, can be found here: http://malocacommunities.org/campaigns-2/current-campaign/.

Help Empowering Youth Cambodia’s Students Who Are in Need of Scholarships

image001Empowering Youth in Cambodia (EYC) runs 4 schools/community centers in slums, serving over 600 students with educational programs.  Currently 30 students also receive direct support for their studies, mostly for university.  Additional students have applied for scholarships, and funds are needed to be able to support them.

One student is who was just awarded a scholarship is named Mai and she just passed the Cambodian high school exam (only 40% passed this year!).  She plans to study social work and she says,

“I would like to say thank you to donors that help me with my study.  I hope to work with youth in need of assistance one day, including those in the countryside who don’t have many opportunities.”

Mai is very studious but also enjoys ultimate Frisbee, cycling, and wants to learn how to swim. We know that Mai will go on to do great things and are happy to be a part of her journey.

Please help other students like Mai achieve their dreams and support EYC’s scholarship students. To donate, please go to; https://secure.donationpay.org/villageearth/youth_cambodia.php

Non-Natives Collect 84.5% of Agriculture Income on South Dakota Reservations

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The USDA recently released the results for their 2012 Census of Agriculture for Native American Reservations and as most Residents of South Dakota Reservations already know, non-native farmers and ranchers dominate. According to the USDA data, a whopping 84.5% of all agriculture income on South Dakota Reservations is collected by non-native producers. In terms of land control, non-native producers control nearly 60% of all agriculture land and 65% of all the active farms and ranches on Native American Reservations. Data for Individual South Dakota Reservations is below.

 % of Farms Operated by American Indians% of Land Controlled by American Indians% of Agricultural Income Collected by American Indians
TOTAL34.38%40.31%15.43%
Cheyenne River48%42.49%23%
Crow Creek27%NA1%
Flandreau Santee14%NA0%
Lake Traverse5%5.04%0%
Lower Brule39%44.14%39%
Pine Ridge55%61.98%28%
Rosebud31%36.80%17%
Standing Rock25%18.74%13%
Yankton18%2.46%1%

Despite the Federal Government’s “highest and best use” policy for Native American Lands, the USDA Agriculture Census data demonstrates that non-natives are the primary beneficiaries of the Resources from American Indian Reservations, not just in South Dakota but throughout the Untied States. The disparity that exists on Reservations today is the outcome of over a century of racist and exclusionary policies that functioned to alienate Tribal members from their lands to make their agricultural and mineral resources available to non-tribal members for lease below market rates. Many Tribal members weren’t even paid some or all of the lease income owed to them by the Federal Government. Even today, virtually all of the lease income collected on some South Dakota Reservations goes directly the USDA to pay down loans created in the 1970s and 1980s for tribes to consolidate highly fractionated lands (a problem created in the first place by the Federal government’s failure to properly manage the conveyance of allotted trust lands from one generation to the next).

World Food Day: Food Insecurity on South Dakota’s American Indian Reservations

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Today, October 16th, 2014 is World Food Day. The World Food Day theme for 2014 is Family Farming: “Feeding the world, caring for the earth”. While most Americans recognize the problem of hunger in so-called “developing countries.” Very few people comprehend the high levels of food insecurity that exists across the United States. This problem is especially acute on American Indian Reservations where a 120 years of exclusionary federal policies have pushed Tribal members off their own lands to make them available to non-tribal farmers and ranchers. This combined with high rates of poverty has created food desserts across indian country.

“Food deserts are defined as urban neighborhoods and rural towns without ready access to fresh, healthy, and affordable food. Instead of supermarkets and grocery stores, these communities may have no food access or are served only by fast food restaurants and convenience stores that offer few healthy, affordable food options. The lack of access contributes to a poor diet and can lead to higher levels of obesity and other diet-related diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease.”

The map above, developed by Village Earth’s Lakota Lands Recovery Project, draws on 2012 data collected by the US Census Bureau and compiled by www.feedingamerica.org to display the county-level data along with the boundaries of South Dakota’s American Indian Reservations. The data shows that on these Reservations, food insecurity (not having enough food within the past year) is has high as 26% percent, some of the highest rates in the country.

Village Earth is trying to transform this situation by supporting local, grassroots efforts to develop more sustainable, more healthy local food systems. For example, on the Pine Ridge Reservation, Village Earth is supporting efforts of the Knife Chief Buffalo Nation organization who seeks to acquire more land to expand their buffalo herds which provide both spiritual and nutritional sustenance for the Lakota people. Earth Tipi, another one of our Global Affiliates, is seeking funds to develop a demonstration “food forest” near the community of Manderson on the Pine Ridge Reservations. Food forests are a form of sustainable regenerative food systems that bring together assemblages of food bearing parennial plants that thrive in local soils and climate and require very little maintenance once established. On the Cheyenne River Reservation, another one of our Global Affiliates “Mni” is working to restore their lands and aquifers by promoting simple watershed restoration and holistic grazing managemnet practices.  The goal of which is to restore their lands and wild plants after 120 years of extractive grazing practices managed by the Federal Bureau of Indian Affairs.

All three of these Village Earth Global Affiliates are currently accepting donations through Globalgiving.org. Please consider making a donation on this World Food Day.

MnidEarthTipiKnifeChief

 

 

All Donations Matched 30% for VE Global Affiliates | Oct. 15th Globalgiving.org Bonus Day.

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Don’t miss out! For one day only, October 15th, 2014, Globalgiving.org will be matching all donations to select micro-projects of Village Earth Global Affiliates.

We at Village Earth believe the most effective and efficient way to support the empowerment of marginalized peoples around the globe is to support and strengthen their own local and indigenous-run organizations. This approach not only helps enhance local self-reliance but also ensures greater cultural and political self-determination. Yet, despite the widespread acknowledgement of  the effectiveness of local organizations in identifying and addressing issues, their work often goes unnoticed.

Below you’ll find a list of Village Earth Affiliates Eligible for the bonus day. Click on one to donate. 

 

Maloca


VE KnifeChief

Check Out These New T-Shirts & Sweat Shirts from VE Affiliate “Earth Tipi”

Get one of these T-Shirts and support Village Earth Global Affiliate “Earth Tipi” at the same time. These comfy 100% cotton t-shirts will quickly become your favorite way to show your support for Lakota Land use, natural building, and sustainable agriculture on the Pine Ridge Reservation. Hurry, popular sizes are running-out fast!

Earth Tipi T-Shirt
Earth Tipi T-Shirt
Quality 100% Cotton T-Shirts. Quote from Sitting Bull: Let us put our minds together and see what life we can make for our children. Earth Tipi logo on back. Proceeds Support Earth Tipi
$20.00
Size :
Earth Tipi Hoodie
Earth Tipi Hoodie
Quality 100% Cotton Hoodie. Quote from Sitting Bull: Let us put our minds together and see what life we can make for our children. Earth Tipi logo on back. Proceeds Support Earth Tipi
$35.00
Size :

 

 

 

 

Agricultural Inequality on American Indian Reservations (2012 Ag Census infographic)

The USDA-NASS recently published the results from their 2012 Census of Agriculture for American Indian Reservations. Naturally, we were interested in what this long-awaited data tells us about the degree of access that Tribal members have to their own lands who, through a history of exclusionary policies and discriminatory practices by the Federal Government,  have been pushed off their legally allotted lands to open them up to non-tribal farmers and ranchers – mostly through leasing programs managed by the Federal Bureau of Indian Affairs. We developed the infographic below to help illustrate what these numbers tells us. However, we feel these numbers, while the most complete to-date, still do not accurately reflect the actual situation of Agriculture on American Indian Reservations – which we believe to be much worse.

Agricultural Inequality AIAN


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: This infographic does not include data from the Navajo Nation because it represents an outlier relative to all other Reservations in the dataset.

Village Earth Affiliate Ho’zho’ogo Nahat’a’ to host Healing with Earth and Sky Workshop

9-2-2014 11-25-38 AM

Statement of Intent

This workshop will gather Indigenous youth, adults, elders, and members of the Flagstaff community using a unique, interdisciplinary process. Our focus will be learning about intergenerational, historical trauma that has affected all people through the process of colonization, oppression, and privilege. Through community participation, ritual, meditation, movement, creative expression, nourishing food and water we will explore a process of decolonizing our bodies and spirits.

Our intention is to create a strong container for healing, connection, and mutual We are actively recruiting Native youth, adults, and elders for participation in this event and providing travel stipends and housing for a select number of Indigenous youth traveling from outside Flagstaff. We seek partners to join us in supporting this project financially so the workshop can be offered affordably to all ($5/students; $10/community members).

Our Guest Instructor:

Rulan Tangen (of Santa Fe, New Mexico), choreographer and director of Dancing Earth, performs, teaches, and lectures internationally. With a devotion toward the development of the innovative field of Indigenous contemporary dance, she has taught extensively in Native communities. She believes in this form of dance as continuing the link of culture from ancient to futuristic.

Organizers and Co-Facilitators:

Marie Gladue, BA, founder of Ho’zho’ogo Nahat’a’, is a Dineh environmental and social justice advocate. She originally envisioned this project with the Indigenous Four Directional Model as its foundation. Marie is a practitioner of Indigenous Community Theater and has developed an organic community process to create artistic performances. She raises Churro sheep and is committed to living a land- based lifestyle on her ancestral land at Black Mesa. [email protected]/(928)380-0110

Hilary Giovale, MLS, teaches Tribal Style Bellydance and Embodiment Practices to women of various backgrounds, including survivors of domestic and sexual violence. As a Pachamama Alliance Facilitator, activist, and community organizer, Hilary is dedicated to building bridges across difference to create a peaceful, socially just, spiritually fulfilled, and environmentally sustainable human presence on our planet. [email protected]/(928)380-1055

  • The workshop will take place at the Center for Indigenous Music and Culture in Flagstaff, AZ, September 10 and 11, 2014
  • The first day is open to Indigenous youth and elders
  • The second day will be open to Indigenous youth as well as members of the local Flagstaff community
  • Nutritious, Native-grown and holistically grown local foods will be prepared by a Native chef and offered each day as part of the experience
  • Co-Sponsors: Grand Canyon Trust/Colorado Plateau Intertribal Gathering, Center for Indigenous Music and Culture, and Anonymous Donors

For more information contact Marie [email protected]/(928)380-0110

Mni Hosts Successful Water Restoration Camp on the Cheyenne River Reservation

The 2014 Mni Water Restoration Camp was held June 22nd to July 6th.  During the two week training session, Mni was host to 35 volunteers and children.  From the outset this entailed expenses in transportation and food to provide for the workers.  

Camp Report by CSU Intern Ryan Reese, Center for Collaborative Conservation
The Mni Water Restoration Camp was a successful effort in both practice and outreach. Through the help of multiple individuals and organizations, the combined projects of water restoration and holistic living at Tatanka Wakpala were accomplished, and the message of holistic land management and restoration was spread to those who attended the camp. Though faced with many difficulties, the participants at Mni persevered in the face of hardship and overcame the obstacles which they faced, and completed many of the projects which were begun.
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The first week was spent preparing camp, creating facilities for future use, maintaining gardens, and surveying the land for water restoration potential. The area around the campsite was mowed, an outhouse was dug on an adjacent hill, and the mobile homes at the site were cleaned out for current and future use. The garden was weeded, furrows were dug, planting mounds were built, and seeds were planted. The stream bed was surveyed for potential dam sites, as were the surrounding hillsides and gullies. Over the course of the week, potential plans were discussed among members of the camp.
There were many different water restoration ideas presented by camp participants. The original goal of putting a few dams in the creek was put off to a future year, as high rainfall had raised the water level too much to allow easy access of the stream bed. At the best potential dam sites in the stream bed, the water was too deep to work with and the soil was quite waterlogged. Another proposition was to build trenches along isobars to hold rain water. Since the area around Tatanka Wakpala has few trees, this type of catchment would fit well with the materials in the area. Unfortunately, the hillsides where the trenches would be placed are also the best sites for home construction on the property, complicating the planning phase. In addition, the trenching machine that was going to be rented for the creation of these trenches had broken down, meaning that any trenches would have to be built with a different machine or dug by hand. For these reasons, the construction of trenches was put off for another year. Luckily, a large number of pine-beetle logs became available for our use for free, allowing us to small dams, or “baffles,” in the washes and gullies on the hillsides above the stream bank.
dams
Over the course of the second week, plans for the dams were finalized. The first dams to be constructed were on the north side of the stream. Five different dams were built in a narrow gully, composed of logs, fence posts, earth, assorted branches and twigs, and barbed wire. These dams were spaced at 15 foot intervals, and were about 8 feet wide and 2 feet tall. Along the banks of the gully, cottonwood trees were planted to restore the ecology in the gully and to solidify the soil and prevent erosion.. On the south side of the stream, 13 dams were built in two different gullies, with six in one and seven in another. These were built with fewer materials, lacking the barbed wire and metal fence posts which the dams on the north side were built of.
A permanent octagonal shade was also built during the second week. The shade will be used for instruction at future camps and as a cook shack once it is complete. The majority of the work for the shade was completed, with only the completion of the roofing and the creation of bracing and supports remaining.
A permaculture workshop was also given during the Mni camp by Bryan Deans, a permaculturist on pine ridge. Mr. Deans walked over the property, discussing the principles and practice of permaculture, water restoration, and holistic management and how it related to the Mni project and . That same week, an ethnobotanical tour was given by Linda (Last Name). The participants at the Mni camp were taken across the property and shown the sacred medicines of the Lakota and told of their uses and cultural significance.
TheMni Water Restoration Camp was a success on many levels. The camp was able to implement part of its water restoration project as well as begin restoring the ecology in the area and reduce hillside erosion, as well as prepare the property for future camps and water restoration efforts. In addition, the camp successfully reached out to multiple organizations and many individuals, spreading knowledge of small-scale, holistic water restoration and building long-lasting relationships that will allow future collaboration on other water restoration projects. Furthermore, as the water restoration efforts proceed, they will act as a showcase for the methods practiced atMni, testifying to the method’s feasibility and promoting its application in other areas. TheMni camp overcame the obstacles which it faced and attained the goals which it set out for itself and prepared future work in the field of water restoration.