Village Earth News

Update from VE Affiliate Knife Chief Buffalo Nation Organization on the Pine Ridge Reservation

 MILA YATAN PIKA PTE OYATE OKOLAKICIYE
(KNIFE CHIEF BUFFALO NATION ORGANIZATION)

PROJECT REPORT

This report covers the period of November & December 2016, and January 2017.    Mila Yatan Pika Pte Oyate Okolakiciye (Knife Chief Buffalo Nation Organization) continues to provide a home/pasture for members of the Pte Oyate (buffalo nation) and the community continues to reap the benefits in terms of spiritual and physical nourishment from them.

 

November, 2016

November 05 – The Knife Chief Buffalo Nation Organization held a strategic planning meeting in Porcupine, SD with Dave Bartechi of Village Earth, Inc..  Working session included revisions of the vision/mission statement and the name change from Knife Chief Buffalo Nation Organization to “Knife Chief Buffalo Nation Society,” drafting a calendar of events and other organizational matters.

November 10 – 13 – The “Lakota Koskalaka Wica Yuwita Pi” (Lakota Young Men’s Camp/Gathering) was held in Porcupine SD.  This Camp was sponsored by a number of societies within the Tiospaye Sakowin organization.   Due to the interest, two camps are held annually – fall and spring.

The photos below show a number of activities during the Camp.

 

November 15 – The Society attended the Oglala Sioux Parks & Recreation Authority (OSPRA) meeting to make a presentation on a proposal to continue to sub-lease a pasture for a home for our relatives, the buffalo.  The Board of Directors approved a six month contract with an option to sub-lease for another six months if the land is available.

The Society received a $10,000 grant from the Tanka Fund to assist with the pasture lease payment and with operational expenses.  This is deeply appreciated and assists greatly with the care of the buffalo.

 

December, 2016

December 01 – The Society met to discuss and make further plans for the Knife Chief Buffalo Nation Society website.  A meeting will be held in March with a Colorado company who will assist with the work.

December 16 & 17 – The Society hosted the “Lakota Mental Health First Aid Training” in Rapid City, SD.  Twenty-two (22) participants representing various Sioux tribes in SD were in attendance.  Trainers were Ethleen Iron Cloud-Two Dogs and Richard Two Dogs of Porcupine, SD.

December 21 – Spiritual offerings were made for the Winter Solstice (Wanicokan)

 

January 2017

The weather in December and January was extremely challenging with frigid temperatures often ranging below zero for days at a time.  Along with extreme cold, blizzards covered the area with blowing and drifting snow.  Many of the Pine Ridge Reservation residents were snowed in and could not leave their homes.  For many days, schools were closed and events were cancelled due to this extreme weather.

 

 

Future Events and Plans

.The caretaker continues to check on our relatives, the buffalo, two times per week depending on the weather and road accessibility.
Will co-facilitate cultural learning sessions for the community on the sacred ceremony of the Wi Wayang Wacipi (Sundance,  the Inipi (purification/renewal ceremony) and other sessions as determined .
Will begin the planning and preparation for the Manhood Ceremony to be held in the Spring.
Planning and preparation is in the process for the following camps:
Young Men’s Camp – To Be Determined

Children’s Camp and Young Women’s Camp – July 5 – 9, 2017 at Camp Bob Marshall in the Black Hills of SD

Manhood Ceremony completed by a young relative.

 

 

Conclusion

Again, we extend a heartfelt appreciation to the people who support our efforts whether it be financially, physically or spiritually.  Your support is truly appreciated and we especially appreciate the Tunkasila (spiritual entities) for their continued support and guidance.  We also acknowledge the Pte Oyate (Buffalo Nation) for what they inspire in us and for their teachings, i.e., protection of the young, conservation of the land and the strength and fortitude to endure whatever is placed in our path.  Lila wopila tanka! (We thank you all very much).

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

Email:  [email protected]

Telephone:  605-441-2914, 605-407-0091

Website:  www.knifechiefbuffalonation.org

or www.villageearth.org look for Knife Chief Buffalo Nation Organization under Global Affiliate.

How to Teach Health: Providing Quality Primary Healthcare to Impoverished, Rural, Isolated Communities

By John Straw, Executive Director at Concern America and Instructor for the Village Earth Community-Based Health online course

Village Earth’s Community Health course focuses on the many challenges, but also opportunities, related to health care (or the lack thereof) in materially impoverished regions of our world.  The course explores a range of insights and actions from methods for determining health needs to creating community-centered approaches for bringing care with/for regions lacking this important human right.  One hopeful program is Concern America’s Health Promoter Practitioner model.  The organization has just self-published a 35-book set of training manuals and student guides in Spanish titled “Cómo Enseñar Sobre La Salud” (How To Teach Health), a resource for organizations wanting to implement comprehensive community health programs in which the people themselves are the health care providers.  The books will soon be sold through The Hesperian Foundation, publisher of the well known resource “Where There Is No Doctor.”

THERE EXISTS A MODEL OF COMMUNITY-BASED, PRIMARY HEALTH CARE THAT IS AFFORDABLE AND EFFECTIVE.  IT IS A MODEL THAT ENGAGES COMMUNITY MEMBERS IN ITS PROVISION: “THE TRAINING AND ACCOMPANYING OF HEALTH PROMOTER PRACTITIONERS”.

In the U.S., the term “health promoter” often refers to individuals who provide health education and basic health care follow-up under the strict supervision of a medical doctor.  In the regions of Latin America where Concern America works, these Health Promoter Practitioners’ depth of knowledge, skills, and ability to provide primary health care, in their native languages, is comparable to the work of physician assistants and nurse practitioners in the U.S.  As a result, in villages located hours away from health care centers and whose residents earn less than $2.00/day, high-quality, low-cost health care is a reality, saving and sustaining innumerable lives, using few resources.

In places like Chiapas, Mexico; Petén, Guatemala; and the Lower Atrato region of Colombia, the health care providers who give daily care in hundreds of villages and towns are not doctors or nurses but rather Health Promoter Practitioners.  These amazing community health care providers, many with less than three years of primary school, have been successfully trained as their communities’ medical practitioners who diagnose and treat patients, administer a wide range of medicines, and even perform surgeries like the tendon repair described above.

The series of books, entitled CÓMO ENSEÑAR SOBRE LA SALUD, employs the wisdom of Paulo Freire’s pedagogy, building on each student’s knowledge and understanding when teaching complicated medical concepts and procedures. There are 35 books in all and three levels of training: a teacher’s guide and a student handbook for each health care theme (e.g., Digestive System) taught over three years.   What is described, presented, and taught in CÓMO ENSEÑAR SOBRE LA SALUD has been fashioned by and in use by Concern America field teams in Latin America over more than 30 years and found to be extraordinarily effective in providing quality primary health care to impoverished, rural, isolated communities.  We want to multiply this model, which is why Concern America is writing CÓMO ENSEÑAR SOBRE LA SALUD.  It will eventually be translated into French and English and, hopefully, adapted to many indigenous languages.

 

FIRST LEVEL OVERVIEW

The Teacher Guides

Each First Level Teacher’s Guide covers important topics such as:

  • How to organize a course and how to teach Health Promoters
  • How to organize community groups
  • How to teach about the use of medicines
  • How to teach about respiratory and digestive diseases
  • How to teach about nutrition and environment

Student Handbooks

Each reference book for the Health Promoter student contains informative documents about how to prevent, diagnose and treat the most common sicknesses and when to refer a patient.

  • The language is simple.
  • The illustrations are clear.
  • The treatment and diagnostic guidelines are easy to understand.

SECOND LEVEL OVERVIEW

Teacher Guides

Second Level Teacher Guides cover the following topics:

  • How to teach about accidents and traumas
  • How to teach about reproductive health
  • How to teach about pregnancy and delivery
  • How to teach about chronic diseases
  • How to teach about dental and oral care

Student’s Handbook

  • The language is progressively more complex.
  • The graphics are explicit and educational.
  • The treatment and diagnostic guidelines are still easy to understand and to adapt.

ELECTRONIC ANNEX

AND THIRD LEVEL OVERVIEW

An Electronic Annex is included with the Teacher Guides. It is an educational tool where the teacher can find:

  • Pictures to project and ready to use Power Points documents
  • Sounds to listen to and recognize symptoms
  • Videos
  • Ready to print games, tests/evaluations and worksheets
  • Ready to print Student Handbooks with and without page numbers, giving flexibility to the teacher to build one’s own customized Student Handbook
  • A PDF of each one of the Teacher’s Guides and Student’s Handbooks from the “Cómo Enseñar Sobre La Salud” series
  • Third level handouts

THE ESSENTIAL MEDICINE INDEX

A vital part of the series “Cómo Enseñar Sobre La Salud,” the Essential Medicine Index (Índice de Medicamentos Esenciales) is THE REFERENCE BOOK of medicine for Health Promoters.

Its very simple and easy to read format and content makes it an indispensable every day tool for beginners and advanced Health Promoters. It contains information about the most prescribed essential medicines. It contains information about the most prescribed essential medicines recommended by the W.H.O.

 

For more information or to purchase the books, please visit Concern America Health Manuals.

To enroll in the Community-Based Health Course click here. Now enrolling through February 28, 2017.

2017 Online Courses are OPEN for Registration

All Spring 2017 online Sustainable Community Development Certificate courses are open for registration. The deadline to register for the first session is January 9, 2017.

January 13 – February 17, 2017

March 3 – April 7, 2017

April 21 – May 26, 2017

 


SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT

Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
January 13 – February 17, 2017 January 9, 2017 Open

Course Description

One of the biggest challenges we face in today’s global economy is the alleviation and ultimate elimination, of poverty. Unemployment, lack of economic opportunities and the inability to provide for one’s needs and those of one’s family, lead to destructive consequences at the individual level and can lead to crime and armed conflict at the social level. While the latest development theory recognizes the importance of entrepreneurship and micro-enterprise generation in combating poverty, providing employment and increasing income, in order to address poverty at the grass-roots level, we need to explore the intersection of traditional business concepts with social venturing. This course aims to provide an understanding of social entrepreneurship that will help us put theory into practice in a meaningful way.

This course will examine entrepreneurship and enterprise generation as a key foundation of the development of both economic and social capital, as well as individual and community empowerment. Its main emphasis will be the exploration of entrepreneurship with an imperative to drive social change and build sustainable ventures. Its focus will be on designing enterprises for the base of the economic pyramid in the context of disadvantaged communities. We will participate in the unfolding dialogue about what constitutes a “social entrepreneur”, develop an understanding of the power of “disruptive innovation”, and study success stories from around the world, thereby gaining valuable insights into how to develop our own enterprises.

This course will require critical thinking, be highly interactive, and students will share their experiences, ideas, insights and challenges. Participants will be able to apply the learning from this course to their own start-ups and field projects.

Instructor:

Vinod Parekh

Social Entrepreneur, Proprietor of Human Development Services, Consultant Trainer and Mentor of several companies, visiting and online faculty at Colorado State University, Independent Director Man Diesel and Turbo India, World traveler.

I began my career in Sales and Marketing and then went on to be with BBC UK and trained as a Broadcaster before I discovered my passion for people development. I continue to be a student of Personal, Organisational and Community Transformation. Education: Organisational Development (OD) Chicago USA, Psychology Major: University of Nagpur, India. Marketing Management at NTC, Calcutta, India. Early Career: Radio and Television Broadcasting, BBC, London, Glasgow, Director Community Development Projects of the Institute of Cultural Affairs International, Chicago, USA an affiliate of the UN.

Current Responsibilities:
• Director-Human Development Services & Human Development Consultants and Trainers-A management consultancy- leadership training and development enterprise which specializes in conducting management alignment, team building, personal and organizational effectiveness enhancement programs for public, private , academic and voluntary sectors.
• Chairman-Unnati Enterprises – A Socio-Economic Enterprise dedicated to empowering rurban communities particularly youth;
• Mentor -Teaching Learning Community of Small & Medium Scale entrepreneurs;
• Visiting Faculty at: Maharashtra Police Academy, India International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), Colorado State University ,USA; Several Management Colleges and Institutes including Bharati Vidyapeet Institute for Management studies and Research, Moonje Mgt Institute, Mahatma Gandhi Management Institutes (MBA program) of the University of Pune, India Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai and Tuljapur;
•Independent Director- MAN Diesel Turbo

Previous Positions:
• Marketing Director-Communication Services, Hyderabad, India.
• Consultant / Trainer- Institute of Cultural Affairs-International, Chicago USA.
• Director Community and Village Development Projects, Maharashtra-India
• Project Director-Community Development Programme, Lusaka, Zambia.

Areas of Expertise:
•Designing and facilitating needs based training and development programmes aimed towards personal, organizational/community transformation using the Technology of Participative Management (ToP)
•Bridging intercultural gaps.

Passion: Traveling, interacting with people.

My MISSION – To equip individuals, communities and organizations (for and not for profit) with practical mindset change techniques and soft skills tools towards enhancing their overall effectiveness. My VISION – Personal and organizational/community transformation.


APPROACHES TO COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
January 13 – February 17, 2017 January 9, 2017 Open
April 21 – May 26, 2017 April 18, 2017 Open

Course Description

Explore both the structure and practice of community development around the world.  Engage in a critical analysis of different approaches to community development, their historical development and underlying assumptions.  Gain an understanding of the structural and practical issues that promote or detract from the goal of community empowerment.

Instructor:

David Bartecchi, M.A.

Dave received his M.A. in Cultural Anthropology from Colorado State University and has worked with Village Earth since 1998.  He is now the executive director of Village Earth.  Since 2000 he has been working with grassroots groups on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to recover lands for community-based bison restoration. He has also worked with the indigenous groups in Peru and Ecuador and trained and consulted on community-based development projects in in Azerbaijan, Armenia, India as well as with Native American tribes in California and Oklahoma.  He has been an instrumental part of several research projects with CSU’s Department of Anthropology including a 6 year longitudinal study of the informal economy on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota funded by the National Science Foundation, a survey of farmers and ranchers participating in the National Conservation Reserve Program conducted by CSU’s Natural Resource Ecology Lab and funded by the USDA, and community-based censuses on the Rosebud and Pine Ridge Reservations in South Dakota. Dave teaches online courses in Approaches to Community Development, Community Mobilization, and Community-based Mapping.


COMMUNITY-BASED FOOD SYSTEMS

Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
January 13 – February 17, 2017 January 9, 2017 Open

The cultivation, preparation, distribution, and consumption of food are practices that shape how we organize ourselves socially, economically and politically. Control over food is central to the sustainability and self-determination of communities. In this seminar, you will learn about different approaches to building community-based food systems and movements for food justice around the world. Together, we will evaluate various strategies for protecting community food resources and rebuilding local food economies, as well as the factors that threaten these efforts. With special consideration for marginalized communities in the global North and South, students will develop a conceptual toolkit and set of resources to help them assess the limitations and possibilities of their own community’s food system.

Instructors:

This course is facilitated by the International Agroecology Action Network (IAEAN) a consultancy group composed of ultra-motivated scientists willing to work hard to change the world. Although we are all agroecologists, we combine our diverse backgrounds and skills in order to dynamically implement sustainable and effective projects. Our pool of available consultants offer a wide range of skills and competences. We seek to improve society through our actions and research and we believe that both grassroots and top-down approaches are necessary to drive systemic change. Our members are currently involved in international organizations, private companies, development associations and in academic spheres.

2016 Holiday Fundraising Campaign to Support Village Earth’s Global Affiliates

2016holidaycampaign

Olimometer 2.52

 Global Affiliate NameGeographic FocusAbout 
Facebook-Vert-LogoVillage Earth Area of Most NeedGlobalLet Village Earth decide how best to allocate your donation.
AmahoroAmahoro ProjectBurundiAmahoro project is a collaboration betweeen Colorado State University and Ngozi University in Burundi (UNG) to establish UNG as a ongoing site and dissemination center for research in sustainable peace and development.
CRDTCambodia Rural Development Team Northeast CambodiaWorks to sustainably improve food security, incomes, and living standards of subsistence rural communities in support of environmental conservation throughout Cambodia.
Earth TipiEarth TipiPine Ridge Reservation, SDWorks to sustainably improve food security, incomes, and living standards of subsistence rural communities in support of environmental conservation throughout Cambodia.
Eco_VEco-Friendly VolunteersSri LankaECO-V is a voluntary organization engaged in environmental conservation in Sri Lanka. ECO-V has a network of 400 volunteers throughout Sri Lanka who contribute to research and community work to support conservation of the environment.
EYCEmpowering Youth CambodiaPnom Penh, CambodiaEYC is a organization working to improve the lives of young people and their families. Our vision is to see youth empowered with skills & confidence to be leaders who actively develop themselves, their families and community.
FOFCODForum for Community Change and DevelopmentSouth SudanFOFCOD envisions a new generation of productive and self-reliant south Sudanese who can ably participate in community development programs to meet their needs and those of other disadvantaged groups.
GOLDGrowing Liberia Democracy (GOLD)LiberiaGOLD promotes poverty reduction as well as democratic & high quality governance by empowering local communities to effectively engage their law makers as to make policy decisions favorable for Liberians and to be fully transparent.
ICA_NEPAlInstitute of Cultural Affairs (Nepal)NepalICA’s mission is to promote social innovation through participation and community building. We do this throughout the country through training, facilitation & development activities.  
Human-and-Hope-Association-500x500Human and Hope AssociationSiem Reap, CambodiaHuman and Hope Association works to empower Cambodians to create sustainable futures for themselves through projects focused on education, vocational training and community support.
JalambaJalamba Nursery School ProjectThe GambiaThe goal of the of the Association is to empower youths, children and vulnerable families through education. The project has government support as a new school  which will serve ages of one through six. 
JenzeraJenzeraColombiaSupports community processes so that people can freely decide on their social, political and economic lives by defending their territories, empowering their own governments and developing a self-managed economies.
KnifeChiefKnife Chief Buffalo NationPine Ridge Reservation, SDThe Knife Chief Buffalo Nation, a grassroots project on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, works to reclaim 1800 acres of ancestral lands for restoring buffalo, and Lakota culture and lifeways.
LBCCLakota Buffalo Caretakers CooperativePine Ridge Reservation, SDThe Lakota Buffalo Caretakers Cooperative (LBCC) is a 100% Native American owned and operated cooperative association on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Its membership is made up of small family buffalo caretakers who respect the buffalo and the land. Members of the LBCC are committed to the restoration of the northern plains ecology, self-sufficiency and strengthening the sovereignty and self-determination of the Oglala Lakota Nation and all indigenous peoples.
LLRPLakota Lands Recovery ProjectSouth Dakota ReservationsThe LLRP works to reclaim and consolidate tribal lands and access the resources needed for the Lakota people to live on, protect, and utilize it — promoting self-determination and sovereignty.
MalocaMalocaAmazon BasinWorks with Indigenous Peoples living in the Amazon Basin. It works directly with Indigenous leaders to raise awareness about the needs of their communities and find means to establish self-sustaining strategies to address their needs.
TasunkeWakanTasunke WakanPine Ridge Reservation, SDOur primary goal is to develop and implement Lakol Wicohan (Lakota life ways and laws, which includes language, values, beliefs, ceremonies and laws of the Lakota people) within the Oyate (Community).
TRCDATitukuke RCDAPetuake, ZambiaTRCDA is devoted to to uplifting livelihoods, reducing illiteracy, poverty and HIV/AIDS Health problems among the communities in Petauke, Zambia

Event: Linking Conservation and Sustainable Livelihoods in High Biodiversity-Poverty Hotspots | Oct. 27th, Fort Collins, Co.

conservation-and-biodiversity-panel

Join us October 27th from 5pm – 6:30 at Avogadros Number, 605 S. Mason Street in Fort Collins, Colorado where Village Earth Executive Director will serve on a panel hosted by Trees, Water, & People to discuss linking conservation and sustainable livelihoods in high biodiversity-poverty hotspots

 

Moderator:

Gemara Gifford, Development Director at Trees, Water, & People

Gemara Gifford is Trees, Water & People’s Director of Development. Gem raises funds and develops projects for TWP’s International and National programs with an emphasis on biodiversity conservation and sustainable livelihoods. Her graduate research in the Highlands of Guatemala aimed to identify practices that optimize bird conservation and the ability of local communities to meet their nutritional and economic needs, and she is now beginning to replicate this model within TWP’s projects in Central Honduras. Gem brings to TWP her extensive background in wildlife conservation, community-based development, and a commitment to working with marginalized communities, critters, and habitats in        the US and Latin America. She completed her M.S. in Natural Resources at Cornell University as a Gates Millennium Scholar, and her B.S. in Zoology at Colorado State University as a Distinguished First Generation Student Scholar.


Panelists:

Sebastian Africano, International Director at Trees, Water & People

Sebastian Africano is the International Director at Trees, Water & People (TWP), which he first joined in 2005 as a Marketing Intern for TWP’s clean cookstove program in Honduras. He joined TWP full-time in 2009 and currently manages all macro aspects of our International Programs, including business development, partnerships and program strategy.  He has a BS in International Business and Marketing from Penn State University, and is looking forward to receiving his MBA from Colorado State University (CSU) in May 2017.  Additionally he supports several CSU programs in the College of Business (Executive Education and Entrepreneurship) and the Warner College of Natural Resources (Center for Collaborative Conservation, CLTL Master’s Program).  


Robin Reid: Director at the Center for Collaborative Conservation

Robin Reid is the Director of the Center for Collaborative Conservation at Colorado State University.  As Director, she oversees all the CCC’s programs and staff. She is also a Professor in the Dept. of Ecosystem Science and Sustainability and Senior Research Scientist in the Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory at CSU. As faculty, she teaches courses in collaborative conservation and sustainability, and helps discover new ways to implement collaborative research-for-action for people and the     environment in the drylands of East Africa, Asia and North America. 


David Bartecchi: Executive Director, Village Earth

David Bartecchi is the Executive Director of Village Earth, a Fort Collins-based not-for-profit organization that provides training and consulting to the aid and relief community including an online Certificate Program in Sustainable Community Development through CSU Online. Village Earth also manages a Global Affiliate program that provides organizational support to 20 grassroots and intermediary organizations in 14 different countries. David has spent the past 18 years working primarily with Native American communities to reclaim their lands from the Bureau of Indian Affairs Range Unit Leasing Program and with indigenous communities in Peru and Ecuador.


Marcela Velasco, Associate Professor, Colorado State University – Political Science

Marcela is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Colorado State University. Her areas of specialization include Latin American Politics, social movements, environmental politics, and development politics. Her research is on Colombian indigenous and Afro-Colombian organizations and how they shape local politics.


Brett Bruyere, Director, Conservation Learning Through Leadership Graduate Program

Brett’s teaching and research addresses environmental communication and community-based conservation, often in a context of developing world settings. He also serves as the Director of the department’s Conservation Leadership through Learning graduate program, and is the founder of Samburu Youth Education Fund, a nonprofit dedicated to educational access in the northern region of Kenya.


Rina Hauptfeld, PhD Candidate, Colorado State University

Rina Hauptfeld is a current doctoral student in the GDPE and HDNR department. As a CCC Fellow her project is focused on partnering with the Coastal Conservation and Education Foundation (CCEF) and the Filipino Citizen Science Network to take advantage of citizen science momentum while giving practitioners tools to sustain work towards community based conservation.

New Village Earth/CSU Course – Humanitarian Assistance Toolbox: Resources for Best Practices

Due to the positive response from our inaugural Introduction to Humanitarian Assistance online course, Village Earth is pleased to announce our second course in the Humanitarian Assistance specialization Humanitarian Assistance Toolbox.*  This course is being offered in collaboration with EmBOLDEN Alliances and is a part of Village Earth’s and Colorado State University Online’s Sustainable Community Development Certificate Program. Now enrolling through November 1, 2015.

Given the basic knowledge and understanding of Humanitarian Assistance, this course provides participants the opportunity to explore various toolkits and standards used throughout Humanitarian Assistance with both breadth and depth.

Participants will gain an understanding for standard resources and guidelines that have been created to ensure and maintain human dignity, quality of life, impactful and sustainable service delivery, and sustainability of response through recovery and resiliency.

This course will provide participants an introduction to tools necessary to engage in humanitarian assistance more effectively. By providing participants the opportunity to examine and understand international standards and guidelines, participants will gain an improved ability to deliver impactful and coordinated action that benefits individuals and communities.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify critical international guidelines used in Humanitarian Assistance.
  • Explain the creation of SPHERE, its significance and utility.
  • Discuss inter-sectoral collaboration in relation to recent emergency contexts.
  • Recognize key tools for needs assessments.
  • Relate international standards to monitoring and evaluation of programming.
  • Describe mainstreaming for vulnerable populations in emergency contexts.

This course will be taught by Neena Jain MD MSTPH DTM&H, who for over twenty years has thrived in international Humanitarian Assistance and Global Health as Program Manager, Country Medical Director, Health Sector Lead, and Technical Advisor with many international nongovernmental organizations throughout Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean. These agencies have included Medecins Sans Frontieres/Doctors Without Borders, International Medical Corps, Australian Aid International, and Save The Children, among others. She is the current Executive Director of emBOLDen Alliances. Dr. Jain was Board-certified in Emergency Medicine in 2001 and practiced as an Attending Physician at Swedish Medical Center and Denver Health Medical Center Emergency Departments. She developed programmatic structure and taught core content using innovative techniques as Director and Deputy Director for the Program in Humanitarian Assistance and Adjunct Faculty for the Global Health Affairs Program at the University of Denver Korbel School of International Studies.

*While it may be helpful to have some prior knowledge in the field of humanitarian assistance, it is not required to have taken any other course in this series before taking Humanitarian Assistance Toolbox.

30% Match on Donations to VE Affiliates in Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Pine Ridge, Burundi, and The Gambia

On Wednesday September 16th, starting at 9am EDT (7:00am MST), GlobalGiving.org will be matching online donations at 30% until the $70,000 in matching funds runs out. Don’t miss this opportunity to supersize your donations to eligible Village Earth Global Affiliates.

Eligible projects are listed below with links to their donation pages on Globalgiving.org.

GG1GG2GG3GG4GG5GG6GG7

Village Earth Welcomes Jalamba Nursury School Project As Our Newest Global Affiliate

JalambaNurseryProject

Village Earth is proud to announce our newest Global Affiliate “The Jalamba Nursery School Project” based in the Village of Jalamba, West Coast Region, Kombo District, The Gambia, West Africa. The goal of the Jalamba Nursery School Project Association is to empower youths, children and vulnerable families through education. The organization has proven its ability to bring sustainable education to children and among the community of Jalamba Village, reducing poverty and illiteracy among vulnerable families who mostly depend on subsistence farming.

The project has government support as a new Nursery School which will serve ages of one through six. While grade school opportunities are available six kilometers away, the Nursery school will provide primary school education affecting numerous families in the community.

The Jalamba Nursury school project is one of the Village Earth global affiliates eligible for a 40% match on Wednesday, July 15th starting at 11am. Link to their globalgiving.org donation page below.

 

Their Village Earth Global Affiliate Page can be accessed here: http://www.villageearth.org/global-affiliates/jalamba-nursery-school-project-association

Buy and Sell New & Used Items on Village Earth’s Online Auction – Now through Jan. 19th.

Looking to get rid of that ugly sweater you received from Aunt Mildred or those slippers you know you’ll never use? Or maybe you have some items laying around the house that you’ve been wanting to sell? Here’s a great way to sell those items while benefiting Village Earth.

It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3.

  1. Go to Village Earth’s Auction Page at http://givingworks.ebay.com/charity-auctions/charity/village-earth/65425/
  2. Choose how much of the sale price you want to donate to Village Earth (from 10% – 100%). 
  3. Click on the “List Your Item” button (see below). Plus, charity listings on eBay have up to 30% higher sell through rates then non-Charity items and they sell for between 2-6% higher prices.

 

EbayGivingWorks

Browse and Buy Items Listed by Our Supporters Below

Auction

 

Remembering Dr. Edwin F. Shinn, Co-Founder of Village Earth and Champion of Human Development

Ed_ShinnThe entire Village Earth family is deeply saddened by the loss of one of our founders, Dr. Edwin F. Shinn who passed away on Friday, November 28th, 2014 at the age of 80. Ed was an extremely kind and humble human being with a spark in his eye that inspired everyone he touched. Serving as Executive Director of Village Earth from 1993 to 2008, Ed was known by staff and volunteers for his unwavering optimism and ability to not only see the “gift” in everyone he encountered but to help them see it as well. As a leader, he was adamant about inclusiveness and participation by everyone, always insisting that both staff and volunteers participate in shaping what Village Earth would become. He was an inspirational, even ecstatic leader and trainer, who had the remarkable ability to lead a group of seemingly unrelated people on a journey beyond the surface-level and into a realm of “deep connectedness”. More than anyone, it was Ed who infused Village Earth with its spirit and culture of participation.

Ed would usually begin a training or workshop with the story of his “awakening” – when, in 1965 he was living with is wife and young children as a new Presbyterian minister in Los Angeles and was driving away on vacation when, in his rear view mirror, he could see the Watts Neighborhood burning from riots incited by a violent encounter between police and a 21 year-old African American man. That experience deeply affected him and initiated a search for meaning, which led Ed and his wife Miriam “Mimi” a year later to the Ecumenical Institute (EI) based on the west side of Chicago. EI would later become the Institute for Cultural Affairs (ICA). While in Chicago, they worked on EI’s “Fifth City Project” in Chicago’s East Garfield Park Community.

 Above is a video created by the ICA to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Fifth City project.

In 1973, Ed and Mimi were called to Oombulgurri, Western Australia to support an Aboriginal elder help his people escape the degrading conditions in Wyndham to form a community on their ancestral lands in a remote part of the Australian outback. The story of the ups and downs of this awe-inspiring community effort were captured in the book “Outback Odyssey” written by Ed’s wife.

In the late 1970s, Ed and Mimi would move to Maliwada, India to work on an ICA Human Development Project and later were part of a Human Development Training School. According to Vinod Parekh, one of Ed’s colleagues at the school, “Ed inspired hundreds of youth with his unending vitality and zest for life.”

He continued to work for ICA as an organizer and trainer, venturing to Kenya, Peru, Guatemala, rural California, Indonesia, and Egypt. While being a gifted facilitator who loved working with people, Ed was always concerned with the big picture – with models and processes and was constantly seeking input and revising his models about how to “transform vast regions across the globe.”  In the 1980s, while in his 50s, he decided to return to school to try to answer some of the particularly challenging questions that were nagging him during all his experiences in rural development. In particular, he was concerned with the problem of scale namely, “what size of population was most effective for the mobilization of resources?” As he would say, “too small and  you’re always dependent on the outside, too large and things become top-down.” He was directed to Colorado State University where at the time, there was a lot of engagement in international development assistance. He was accepted into the Ph.D. program in Sociology and carried-out field research working to form Water User’s Associations on a large-scale irrigation project in Pakistan. His dissertation titled The social organization of irrigation in the Niazbeg command area: the Punjab, Pakistan was accepted in 1987 and consisted of two volumes with over 630 pages.

Soon after completing his Ph.D., Ed and Mimi left for Egypt where he helped to develop an Irrigation Advisory Service and trained its personnel to work with farmers in setting up water user organizations to improve irrigated agriculture. Afterward, they moved back to Fort Collins and guided a cooperative development exchange relationship between Mexican and US communities known as Partner Communities. They also helped Dr. Maurice Albertson organize an international conference on sustainable village-based development which was held September 28 – October 2 , 1993 at Colorado State University. It was attended by approximately 250 delegates from 40 different countries. The majority of those in attendance were from developing nations and represented local non-governmental organizations working in very grassroots and participatory projects around the world. More than 200 papers were submitted and formed five volumes of Proceedings. By the end of the conference it was agreed that the hosts should form a consortium made up of the participants. The purpose of the organization, originally called the Consortium for Sustainable Village-Based Development (CSVBD), would be to launch several pilot projects, provide training in the methods discussed at the conference, and provide monitoring and evaluation services and coordinate demonstration projects on the ground. According to Ed, “Perhaps one of the most important functions of CSVBD is to insure that the local NGOs build teams with expertise in key development sectors that can interact with both the public and private sectors to secure needed resources.” CSVBD officially changed its name to Village Earth in 2000.

Below is one of the last videos of Ed, talking about his history working in community development and general philosophies of life. 

Ed served as Executive Director for Village Earth from its inception in 1993 to 2008 and oversaw the realization and growth of the organization including developing and delivering numerous sessions of Village Earth’s flagship training “Participatory Practices for Sustainable Development”, assisting with the growth of the Nigeria’s Youth Service Corps, helping to develop micro-finance projects in Pune and Nasik India, assisting with the development of two large cluster development programs in Nepal, consulting on projects with Mercy Corps International, International Rescue Committee, CHF and CARE, helping to create a Ph.D. program in Sustainable Development Management at Trisakti University in Jakarta Indonesia and overseeing the creation of Village Earth’s Online Certificate Program in Sustainable Community Development at Colorado State University. He remained a part of Village Earth’s Board of Directors until his passing 2014. We are certain Ed has found a comfortable place among the cosmos.

Ways to Support Village Earth and Our Global Affiliates This Holiday Season

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The Holidays are an important time for our Global Affiliates. During the months of November and December is when our Affiliates receive a significant percentage of their donations for the year. This year, we have set a goal of raising $40,000 by December 30th (the end of the 2013-2014 tax-year). Below are some ways you can help us achieve this goal.


 

Become a Village Earth Holiday Campaign Captain

Join our end of year fundraising team by becoming a Campaign Captain. Captains set a personal fundraising goal to support one or more affiliates and then reach out to their friends, family, church, or other social networks to raise funds. If you’re interested in becoming a captain or learning more about the opportunity, please contact [email protected]


 

Form a Giving Circle

Do you ever wish that you could do more than than just a contribute $20 or $50 dollars to a project that in total may cost many thousands of dollars? Wouldn’t it be nice to fund an entire project and have a more intimate role with all phases of implementation? If you answered yes to the questions, than you should organize a giving circle.

“Giving circles are a form of philanthropy where groups of individuals donate their own money or time to a pooled fund, decide together where to give these away to charity or community projects and, in doing so, seek to increase their awareness of and engagement in the issues covered by the charity or community project. Many circles, in addition to donating their money, also contribute their time and skills to support causes.” — Wikipedia

If you are interested in forming a giving a circle Village Earth can help. We offer the following benefits for groups that make a pledge to raising funds for any of Village Earth’s Global Affiliates. This might include:

  • In-person presentations for your circle so they can learn about our Affiliates or dialogue about the status of project they have funded.
  • Regular telephone or video conferences with project leaders around the globe.
  • Site visits to see or help implement  projects your circle has funded.

To facilitate the formation of your giving circle, we have partnered with SocialFund.org.

Social Fund is for groups of people who want to start combined charitable giving accounts. You start one with your family, friends, student organization, or faith community, and pitch in each month. After a few months have passed, your fund votes on where to give out grants, with more than 1.8 million charities to choose from!

We recommend Social Fund for groups that may dispersed or who are unfamiliar with one-another and need a way to efficiently collaborate and collect funds online. Village Earth can also create an account for your group, when you reach a certain account balance your group can then decide how to allocate those funds, either to one or more projects. For more information contact David Bartecchi [email protected]


 

Respond to our Annual Appeal Letter

Each year during the week of Thanksgiving, Village Earth sends out a physical mailing to thousands of our supporters. Responding to this letter by sending a check is one of the best ways to donate since there are no transactions fees. We usually mirror this letter by email for those people for which we don’t have a physical mailing address. You can respond either by donating online or by sending a check in the mail. You can use the form on the sidebar if you would like to join our mailing list.

Alternatively you can, save us a stamp and donate now online or send a check to:

Village Earth
PO Box 797
Fort Collins, Co. 80522


 

 

Contribute to One of Our Microprojects at Globalgiving.org

While we prefer that people already familiar with Village Earth or our Global Affiliates donate directly via check (to avoid transaction fees) several of our affiliates will be running campaigns on Globalgiving.org. If you’re employer provides matching or gives Globalgiving.org gift cards, please choose a project from one of our Global Affiliates. Plus, on December 2nd (Giving Tuesday), Globalgiving.org and Microsoft will be matching donations dollar-for-dollar for all donations to Empowering Youth Cambodia made at Globalgiving.org


 

Donate Your Car, Boat or RV!

car-donatWhy go through the hassle of selling your old car, boat or RV when we’ll handle the whole process for you? Donating your car can be a fast and easy way to make a significant contribution to Village Earth or one of our affiliates. Plus, you’ll get a tax-deduction for the value of your vehicle. We use the trusted V-DAC service (also used by NPR’s Car Talk) to help streamline the car donation process for donors living anywhere in the United States. Click here or the link below to donate your used car. Note: please contact us if you’re donation is intended for one of our Affiliates.

Vehicle Donation

 Processing/Transaction Fees: Village Earth retains up to 70% – 75% of Net Recovery of Vehicle.


 

Support Village Earth whenever you buy or sell something on eBay.com

Looking to get rid of those horrible slippers that you got as a Christmas gift from your aunt in Boca Raton? Or maybe you recently upgraded your phone or gaming system and need to clear some space – here’s a great way to get to get rid of that old stuff and benefit Village Earth at the same time. Now with eBay Giving Works, you can list your items and choose a percentage that will go to Village Earth once it’s sold. Not only are you support a good cause, but your item will stand out to buyers with a blue and yellow ribbon logo displayed right next to the item’s title. Charity listings on eBay have up to 30% higher sell through rates then non-Charity items and they sell for between 2-6% higher prices.

 

Here are some ideas on how you can use eBay Giving Works to support Village Earth. 

  • Host your own charity auction for Village Earth or one of our Global Affiliates
  • Get a tax-deduction for that old clunker vehicle, boat or RV in the driveway.
  • Liquidate the estate of a loved-one who has recently passed away.
  • Clean out that garage or attic.

To start listing items go to: http://givingworks.ebay.com/charity-auctions/charity/village-earth/65425/

Be sure to add Village Earth as one of your causes on eBay.

Follow us on eBay

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Tell Your Friends on Social Media About Us.

Even if you aren’t able to make a financial contribution, you can help others learn about Village Earth and our Global Affiliates by sharing us with your friends on social media. Here’s how:

  • “Like” Village Earth and your favorite Global Affiliates on Facebook and “Follow” us on Twitter
  • “Like” and “Share” posts you like from Village Earth and our Affiliates. Be sure to comment and encourage your friends to support our work.
  • “Tweet” about @VillageEarthOrg and “Retweet” Tweets of ours that you like.

Technology in Community Development – Culture, Ethics, and Why it Matters

How often have you gone into a community and seen a broken down water well, unused school building, or decrepit renewable energy project?  Some NGO came in with good intentions, but for a myriad of reasons after they leave these projects fall into a state of disrepair.  And unfortunately the blame is often put on the community furthering an internal feeling of dis-empowerment and lack of self-efficacy.  When really the problems lies in the implementation of the technology itself.

What is appropriate technology all about? It is a way of thinking about technological change; recognizing that tools and techniques can evolve along different paths toward different ends. It includes the belief that human communities can have a hand in deciding what their future will be like, and that the choice of tools and techniques is an important part of this. It also includes the recognition that technologies can embody cultural biases and sometimes have political and distributional effects that go far beyond a strictly economic evaluation. “A.T.” therefore involves a search for technologies that have, for example, beneficial effects on income distribution, human development, environmental quality, and the distribution of political power—as well as productivity—in the context of particular communities and nations.  —Village Earth’s Appropriate Technology Sourcebook

We all introduce and use technologies in our community development work whether we recognize it or not.  But how often do we step back and reflect on the cultural biases or political implications that these technologies bring with them?  Technology is not neutral, but by working with communities on the process of appropriate technology generation we can hope to develop ethical technologies that are appropriate to their environmental, socio-cultural, political, and economic contexts.  Through the process of bottom-up appropriate technology generation and the tandem use of both hard (tangible) and soft (participation, community organization, etc) technologies this process can be both empowering for local people and sustainable in the long-term.

Join us to learn more about these concepts in our Technology and Community Development Online Course now enrolling through October 26.  This course is a part of our Sustainable Community Development Certificate and counts toward the specializations in Service and Civic Engagement, Community Planning and Development, and Participatory Facilitation.

Spring 2015 Sustainable Community Development Online Course Schedule

In partnership with both Colorado State University Online Plus (CSU) and Duke University Continuing Studies we are pleased to announce that our Spring 2015 Sustainable Community Development Certificate online course schedule has been released.  Spring 2015 courses will open for registration by October 15, 2014 for CSU courses and will open by this Friday, September 26, 2014 for Duke courses.  Take a look at the 2015 spring schedule below and begin planning your own schedule of courses for either a general Sustainable Community Development certificate or choose one of our specialized tracks.

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Term 1: January 9 – February 13, 2015

Term 2: February 27 – April 3, 2015

Term 3: April 17 – May 22, 2015

 

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Term 1: January 16 – February 20, 2015

Term 2: March 6 – April 10, 2015

Term 3: April 24 – May 29, 2015

40% Match on All Donations Today Only Through Globalgiving.org. Donate Now!

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 Today only! Globalgiving.org will be matching all donations to Village Earth’s Global Affiliate Program or Knife Chief Buffalo Nation. Don’t miss this opportunity to increase the value of your donation by 40%! Click on the image above to donate.

Introducing New Training Instructor John Straw, Executive Director for Concern America.

JohnStraw…John Straw, Executive Director over at Concern America!  He will be teaching a few different online courses in the Sustainable Community Development Certificate program starting with the upcoming Approaches to Community Development course through Colorado State University (Registration deadline this Sunday, July 20).

John Straw grew up in Flint, Michigan and received his Bachelors from the University of Michigan with a degree in Spanish and Education. He went on to earn a Masters in Education from the University of Illinois at Chicago, focusing on social justice and bilingual education. John and his wife lived for five years in Honduras and Guatemala working on a variety of community-based health and development projects. For the past 15 years, John has worked with Concern America, an international development and refugee aid organization based in southern California, with health, water, and income-generation projects in Latin America and Africa. He has been the Executive Director of Concern America since 2012.

In addition to his international development work, John has taught Spanish at the middle and high school levels, is on the school board of his daughter’s dual immersion school, and regularly participates in local political, justice, and solidarity efforts focused on Latin America. John and his wife are the proud parents of two children ages 15 and 12.

We are excited to have him on board and we think he will be a valuable addition to our training faculty!

Impactful Online Training for Stakeholders from Different Locations

Village Earth’s Sustainable Community Development Certificate program is a great way to train different stakeholders who may not all be in the same area, but need to be working on the same page.  For example, we have had organizations and private companies send groups through our certificate program which included local community members, company employees, NGO staff, and local government officials.  This is a great way to make sure everyone in your project group is working from the same development philosophy, using the same terminology, and can come to consensus on project design and M&E plans.  Especially if staff and local people are located in different countries, it is a great way to train everyone together while saving on transportation and in-person training costs.  And studies show, knowledge is gained and retained just as effectively from online training as it is from in-person training.

Now registering for courses that begin next week, April 25, at Duke University!  To explore training your group, please visit our Sustainable Community Development Certificate Online Training page. 

Sustainable Community Development Certificate Summer Courses Open

colorado_state_university_logo-1135358447Colorado State University has just opened registration for its online summer courses for the Sustainable Community Development Certificate Program.  Sessions are now open for June and July 2014.

Courses now open for registration:

What Sustainable Community Development Looks Like a Decade Later

Over ten years ago, Village Earth supported the creation of a microfinance initiative in the Marathi village of Belgaon Dhaga just outside of Nashik, India.  Village Earth’s support wound down as the community paid back the microfinance loans and created their own long-enduring institutions for the continued development of their community.  From the outset, five businesses were created using microfinance loans and now ten years later these businesses are flourishing and the microfinance initiative has continued of the community’s own accord by way of various intra-community savings and lending groups.

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Community leaders with a Village Earth representative.

Back in February, Village Earth was invited back to Belgaon Dhaga to see the community’s progress in the decade since and the results were remarkable.  The community hosted an award ceremony to honor local community talent, which included young artists, teachers, exceptional students, entrepreneurs, and women’s savings groups.  Children spoke about how after learning to read how they went home and taught their own mothers to read, young entrepreneurs gave encouragement to others to go out and start their own ventures, and all this was interspersed with local songs and dances by the school children.  Belgaon Dhaga is even more impressive in its focus on gender equity electing women to the top village leadership positions.The community leaders work with local government and business leaders to create long-enduring support for community initiatives.

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Young entrepreneur Dattu Dhage receiving the Role Model Innovative Farmer award from the Chief Minister of the state of Maharashtra.

And the list goes on and on…Belgaon Dhaga has been nominated for the national award for the most comprehensive, sustainable development including the most successful microfinance project model. Recently when a high level government delegation from Delhi came to ‘inspect’ the village, they were stunned to hear the young village leaders present their community development and training model and were shown different achievements in Belgaon Dhaga. One of the organic farmers from the community was recently chosen as the most innovative young farmer by the state of Maharashtra in February.

This is what sustainable community development should look like, and we at Village Earth are very proud of the achievements of Belgaon Dhaga.  This community has become a role model for other villages around the world.  Village Earth hopes to offer training and study tour opportunities in this area in the future so other development practitioners can learn from the community themselves and their decade of experience with truly bottom-up, participatory community development.  If you are interested in potential study tour opportunities, e-mail [email protected].  Kamala Parekh, a Village Earth online instructor, lives in the community and has been seminal in the success of the microfinance program and she teaches our microfinance course online through both Colorado State University and Duke University.

Free Download: “Take Back the Land! The Social Function of Land and Housing, Resistances & Alternatives”.

Take Back the Land! The Social Function  of Land and Housing,  Resistances & Alternatives.Village Earth recently published a chapter in the new book, Take Back the Land!: The Social Function of Land and Housing, Resistances & Alternatives published by Ritmo which opens public information centers on global issues, organizes civil society campaigns and develops awareness-raising and training sessions. Ritimo is actively involved in disseminating documents and information online, by means of its website: www.ritimo.org and co-edited by AITEC (Association Internationale des Techniciens, Experts et Chercheurs – International Organisation of Engineers, Experts and Researchers). This publication is part of the The Passerelle Collection which presents experiences, analyses and proposals by actors of social change. Each issue is an attempt to weave together various contributions on a specific issue by civil society organisations, media, trade unions, social movements, citizens, academics, etc.

Village Earth’s article appears on page 90 and is titled: “The Role of Low-Income Housing in Devaluing the Social Capital of the Oglala Lakota.” You can download this publication in English for free.

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The Article from Village Earth Director, David Bartecchi

“If land, whether rural or urban, were viewed as playing an essential role in all human beings’ life, just like air or water, and its value in use outweighed its exchange value, wouldn’t our cities and countryside look completely different ? Many social movements, researchers, social organisations, local and national authorities as well as international organisations are concerned by the issue of the social function of land and of housing, worldwide.A reflection on different ways to relate to land – other than ownership – must therefore be carried out, i.e. ways that do not entail abusing, speculating or excluding others. Thanks to contributions by different actors, this issue sheds a light on the progress of the social function of land and housing in the different areas of the world. This issue’s singularity is linked to its insight into a potential alliance between inhabitants and peasants, between rural and urban issues. Much food for thought is set forth here on points of mutual interest, alternatives and resistance practices around the world.

You can download this publication in English for free.

Charlotte Mathivet is a political scientist and a right to housing and right to the city activist. She edited number 7 of the Passerelle Collection,Housing in Europe : Time to Evict the Crisis. She is the coordinator-editor of this issue This publication is also available in French. It also will be available in Spanish in March and launched at the World Urban Forum in Medellín in Aprill 2014.”

Village Earth Welcomes Affiliates From The Cheyenne River Reservation & Zambia

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We are excited to announce the addition of two new Global Affiliates: “Mni” (which means “water” in the Lakota language) based on the Cheyenne River Reservation in South Dakota and Titukuke Rural Community Development Association based in Petuake Zambia. (Both of which are eligible for 30% match on all donations made on Wednesday, February 12th – Show Your Support Here!)

Mni - Cheyenne River Reservation

The Mni Restoration Project is focused reversing global climate change by advocating for global watershed restoration. At the local level, their plan is to take action by constructing thousands of small water catchments at all elevations along Reservation streams and watercourses. This will slow rainwater run-off, increase ground water infiltration and capture eroded soils, creating ideal conditions for reforestation and natural plant resurgence. Trees and vegetation will hold the water on the land, direct it into the ground and, through evapo-transpiration, release it back into the atmosphere. Reestablishing the small water cycle allows the moisture to return to these same lands as gentle rainfall and the process repeats. The sacred water cycle upon which all life depends is mended. A balance is attained.

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Titukuke Rural Community Development Association (TRCDA) was established in 2001 and registered in 2005 by Gertrude Soko and a few other rural community-based citizens who wanted to identify the options that could help alleviate the numerous social and economic hardships that the rual citizens were facing. The organization started mobilizing communities for health and social change in all areas of human development which saw the establishment of clubs for women, youth and widows as well as the establishment of community schools for children and women. The organization is run using bottom-up approach where by the AGM elects area representatives and board members from among themselves.

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