How to Teach Health: Providing Quality Primary Healthcare to Impoverished, Rural, Isolated Communities

By John Straw, Executive Director at Concern America and Instructor for the Village Earth Community-Based Health online course

Village Earth’s Community Health course focuses on the many challenges, but also opportunities, related to health care (or the lack thereof) in materially impoverished regions of our world.  The course explores a range of insights and actions from methods for determining health needs to creating community-centered approaches for bringing care with/for regions lacking this important human right.  One hopeful program is Concern America’s Health Promoter Practitioner model.  The organization has just self-published a 35-book set of training manuals and student guides in Spanish titled “Cómo Enseñar Sobre La Salud” (How To Teach Health), a resource for organizations wanting to implement comprehensive community health programs in which the people themselves are the health care providers.  The books will soon be sold through The Hesperian Foundation, publisher of the well known resource “Where There Is No Doctor.”

THERE EXISTS A MODEL OF COMMUNITY-BASED, PRIMARY HEALTH CARE THAT IS AFFORDABLE AND EFFECTIVE.  IT IS A MODEL THAT ENGAGES COMMUNITY MEMBERS IN ITS PROVISION: “THE TRAINING AND ACCOMPANYING OF HEALTH PROMOTER PRACTITIONERS”.

In the U.S., the term “health promoter” often refers to individuals who provide health education and basic health care follow-up under the strict supervision of a medical doctor.  In the regions of Latin America where Concern America works, these Health Promoter Practitioners’ depth of knowledge, skills, and ability to provide primary health care, in their native languages, is comparable to the work of physician assistants and nurse practitioners in the U.S.  As a result, in villages located hours away from health care centers and whose residents earn less than $2.00/day, high-quality, low-cost health care is a reality, saving and sustaining innumerable lives, using few resources.

In places like Chiapas, Mexico; Petén, Guatemala; and the Lower Atrato region of Colombia, the health care providers who give daily care in hundreds of villages and towns are not doctors or nurses but rather Health Promoter Practitioners.  These amazing community health care providers, many with less than three years of primary school, have been successfully trained as their communities’ medical practitioners who diagnose and treat patients, administer a wide range of medicines, and even perform surgeries like the tendon repair described above.

The series of books, entitled CÓMO ENSEÑAR SOBRE LA SALUD, employs the wisdom of Paulo Freire’s pedagogy, building on each student’s knowledge and understanding when teaching complicated medical concepts and procedures. There are 35 books in all and three levels of training: a teacher’s guide and a student handbook for each health care theme (e.g., Digestive System) taught over three years.   What is described, presented, and taught in CÓMO ENSEÑAR SOBRE LA SALUD has been fashioned by and in use by Concern America field teams in Latin America over more than 30 years and found to be extraordinarily effective in providing quality primary health care to impoverished, rural, isolated communities.  We want to multiply this model, which is why Concern America is writing CÓMO ENSEÑAR SOBRE LA SALUD.  It will eventually be translated into French and English and, hopefully, adapted to many indigenous languages.

 

FIRST LEVEL OVERVIEW

The Teacher Guides

Each First Level Teacher’s Guide covers important topics such as:

  • How to organize a course and how to teach Health Promoters
  • How to organize community groups
  • How to teach about the use of medicines
  • How to teach about respiratory and digestive diseases
  • How to teach about nutrition and environment

Student Handbooks

Each reference book for the Health Promoter student contains informative documents about how to prevent, diagnose and treat the most common sicknesses and when to refer a patient.

  • The language is simple.
  • The illustrations are clear.
  • The treatment and diagnostic guidelines are easy to understand.

SECOND LEVEL OVERVIEW

Teacher Guides

Second Level Teacher Guides cover the following topics:

  • How to teach about accidents and traumas
  • How to teach about reproductive health
  • How to teach about pregnancy and delivery
  • How to teach about chronic diseases
  • How to teach about dental and oral care

Student’s Handbook

  • The language is progressively more complex.
  • The graphics are explicit and educational.
  • The treatment and diagnostic guidelines are still easy to understand and to adapt.

ELECTRONIC ANNEX

AND THIRD LEVEL OVERVIEW

An Electronic Annex is included with the Teacher Guides. It is an educational tool where the teacher can find:

  • Pictures to project and ready to use Power Points documents
  • Sounds to listen to and recognize symptoms
  • Videos
  • Ready to print games, tests/evaluations and worksheets
  • Ready to print Student Handbooks with and without page numbers, giving flexibility to the teacher to build one’s own customized Student Handbook
  • A PDF of each one of the Teacher’s Guides and Student’s Handbooks from the “Cómo Enseñar Sobre La Salud” series
  • Third level handouts

THE ESSENTIAL MEDICINE INDEX

A vital part of the series “Cómo Enseñar Sobre La Salud,” the Essential Medicine Index (Índice de Medicamentos Esenciales) is THE REFERENCE BOOK of medicine for Health Promoters.

Its very simple and easy to read format and content makes it an indispensable every day tool for beginners and advanced Health Promoters. It contains information about the most prescribed essential medicines. It contains information about the most prescribed essential medicines recommended by the W.H.O.

 

For more information or to purchase the books, please visit Concern America Health Manuals.

To enroll in the Community-Based Health Course click here. Now enrolling through February 28, 2017.

Spring Session II Courses Now Open for Registration in Online Certificate Program in Sustainable Community Development

 

Classes for the Village Earth/CSU online certificate program in Sustainable Community Development are open for registration until March 3rd, 3017. This session we are offering four courses: Participatory Monitoring and EvaluationDevelopment and the Politics of EmpowermentCommunity-Based Health, and Community-Based Mapping.

Descriptions, instructor profiles, and registration links for each course can be found below.

PARTICIPATORY MONITORING & EVALUATION

Course Tuition:  $390
Continuing Education Units: 2
Duration: 5 weeks

Next OfferedDeadline to RegisterRegistration StatusOffered By 
March 3 - April 7, 2017February 28, 2017Open

Course Description

Discover participatory methods in monitoring and evaluation for community development, where multiple stakeholders are involved in the process of planning, collecting, interpreting, communicating, and using information. Gain skills in using regular monitoring and evaluation processes, which will lead to continuous improvements.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Plan a monitoring and evaluation project
  • Develop evaluation questions that address stakeholders needs
  • Select the most appropriate data collection method for a given situation
  • Effectively communicate monitoring and evaluation data
  • Use the monitoring information for effective feedback and improvement

Instructor

Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation

Pilar Robledo

Pilar is currently Director of Programming and Training for US Peace Corps in Kiev, Ukraine. She’s also serves as Education Cluster Co-lead at UNICEF Pakistan. Previously she’s worked for UNHCR, Save the Children, International Rescue Committee, and IREX. She holds an MPA in Public Administration from University of Colorado, Denver and a BA in Anthropology and Latin American Studies from CU Boulder.

 

 

 


DEVELOPMENT AND THE POLITICS OF EMPOWERMENT

Course Tuition:  $390
Continuing Education Units (CEU’s): 2
Duration: 5 weeks

Next OfferedDeadline to RegisterRegistration StatusOffered By 
March 3 – April 7, 2017February 28, 2017Open

Course Description

“…development is a process of empowerment.”
–Edwards, The Irrelevance of Development Studies

Over the last few decades, many scholars have begun to challenge traditional conceptions of development. Their work has generated an intense debate between those that attribute “underdevelopment” to cultural factors, and those that dismiss such ideas as racially motivated and instead recognize poverty and marginalization as primarily structural and systemic issues. Indeed, the concept of poverty itself has been challenged. Employing this critical lens, the course will examine the assertion that development should not only be seen as an economic process of wealth accumulation, but rather as a socio-political process of empowerment. This realization has major implications for how NGOs approach development, as it brings to light the fact that this work has a substantial political component. In order to overcome the disadvantages of poverty, structural barriers to success must be addressed. Through a careful investigation of the historical applications of development, we will explore the idea that development is an inherently political process and challenge the claim that any development NGO is apolitical. Additionally, we will strive to identify successful methods of community empowerment through political organization.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Analyze the underlying political implications and perspectives of seemingly apolitical actions in development work
  • Apply and refine techniques of empowerment and advocacy
  • Explain the history of development thinking as it relates to politics
  • Articulate a broader understanding of key terms, such as empowerment, participation, politics, and power

Instructor

Jamie Way, M.A.

Jamie received her M.A. in Political Science from Colorado State University. Her academic work focused on Latin America, international development, political theory and indigenous rights. She has worked with Village Earth since 2008 and now holds the position of Training Director for Village Earth/Colorado State University’s online certificate program in Community-Based Development. She has also been involved with Village Earth’s work on the Pine Ridge Reservation and in the Peruvian Amazon for the past three years. Her specialties include advocacy campaigns, strategic planning, issue framing and training for social justice.

Jamie speaks Spanish and Portuguese and is studying Chinese in Beijing. She is also currently working as Media and Communications Coordinator at Alliance for Global Justice, a Latin America solidarity organization.  Jamie teaches online courses on Approaches to Community Development, Development and the Politics of Empowerment and Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation.


COMMUNITY-BASED HEALTH

Course Tuition:  $390
Continuing Education Units (CEU’s): 2
Duration: 5 Weeks

Next OfferedDeadline to RegisterRegistration StatusOffered By 
March 3 – April 7, 2017February 28, 2017Open

Course Description

Access to health care and other resources, such as nutritious foods, employment, clean water, safe housing, education, etc. are crucial to maintaining health and well-being.  In an ideal world, everyone would have access to these essential means for survival, however, it is all too apparent that this is not the case for many communities and populations around the world.  It is desirable, therefore, for those groups who are not supported by a formal health care system to seek alternative solutions for the resources they lack.  Using case studies and other readings, along with group discussion, this course will explore the global, social, political, economic, and cultural factors that contribute to poor health.  It will also look at methods for empowering communities who lack access to health care to create practical solutions that are relevant to their unique situations.  Community-Based Participatory Research will be one of the key strategies dealt with in this course due to its focus on promoting change at the grass roots level.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify micro and macro level factors that affect health and well-being.
  • Collaborate with communities to evaluate their needs in regard to health and cultivate ideas for appropriate actions to address those needs.
  • Provide support for community-based solutions to health issues by establishing connections to information and resources.

Instructor

JohnStrawJohn Straw, M.Ed.

John Straw has an M.Ed. from the University of Illinois at Chicago, focused on social justice education, and his bachelors from the University of Michigan with a degree in Spanish and Education. John has spent five years working in Honduras and Guatemala on community-based health and development projects, and the past 15 years working with Concern America, an international development and refugee aid organization, based in southern California, with health, water, and income-generation projects in Latin America and Africa. He has been the Executive Director of Concern America since 2012.


COMMUNITY-BASED MAPPING

Course Tuition:  $390
Continuing Education Units (CEUs): 2
Duration: 5 weeks

Next OfferedDeadline to RegisterRegistration StatusOffered By 
March 3 – April 7, 2017February 28, 2017Open
 

Course Description

Mapping can be a powerful tool for communities to use to better manage their resources, plan for the future, record and utilize local knowledge, raise awareness about areas of concern in their environmental and social landscape, and communicate their priorities and concerns to external agencies or government officials. This course will explore theories, ethics, applications, and methods of community-based mapping and its role in participatory learning and action as well as larger processes of integrated community-based development. Students will be encouraged to develop a specific research/mapping question relevant to their interests and/or work and with the help of the instructor, will identity the mapping methods and tools to answer that question creating both a final product for the course as well as solid foundation that can be utilized in a more community-based research setting.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Summarize the basic principles, theories, and ethics of Community-based mapping and its role in Community-based development
  • Identify which mapping methods and tools are most appropriate to achieve the desired objectives in your community
  • Locate and utilize existing geographic information data sets, online and elsewhere, for specific project areas
  • Perform some basic mapping functions including projecting GPS coordinates onto a map, downloading and projecting satellite images, creating features from aerial imagery, and more.

Testimonials from Past Course Participants for Community-based Mapping:

“I am grateful to this course to make me think about space and power in such pronounced and palpable terms.” – UNDP Employee

“The assertion that mapping is power and that there are differences between mapping and community based mapping stuns me. This whole course is really an eye opener…These assigned readings make me think…One of the most profound readings was on the ethical considerations. More thinking – what am I trying to do here. As part of my job, merely asking programs to use maps of someone else’s making to communicate where they are and what they’re proposing to do in those locations. Not so simple, eh?”

David Bartecchi, M.A.

Dave received his M.A. in Cultural Anthropology from Colorado State University and has worked with Village Earth since 1998.  He is now the executive director of Village Earth.  Since 2000 he has been working with grassroots groups on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to recover lands for community-based bison restoration. He has also worked with the indigenous groups in Peru and Ecuador and trained and consulted on community-based development projects in in Azerbaijan, Armenia, India as well as with Native American tribes in California and Oklahoma.  He has been an instrumental part of several research projects with CSU’s Department of Anthropology including a 6 year longitudinal study of the informal economy on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota funded by the National Science Foundation, a survey of farmers and ranchers participating in the National Conservation Reserve Program conducted by CSU’s Natural Resource Ecology Lab and funded by the USDA, and community-based censuses on the Rosebud and Pine Ridge Reservations in South Dakota.

Dave teaches online courses in Approaches to Community Development, Community Mobilization, and Community-based Mapping.


 

2017 Online Courses are OPEN for Registration

All Spring 2017 online Sustainable Community Development Certificate courses are open for registration. The deadline to register for the first session is January 9, 2017.

January 13 – February 17, 2017

March 3 – April 7, 2017

April 21 – May 26, 2017

 


SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT

Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
January 13 – February 17, 2017 January 9, 2017 Open

Course Description

One of the biggest challenges we face in today’s global economy is the alleviation and ultimate elimination, of poverty. Unemployment, lack of economic opportunities and the inability to provide for one’s needs and those of one’s family, lead to destructive consequences at the individual level and can lead to crime and armed conflict at the social level. While the latest development theory recognizes the importance of entrepreneurship and micro-enterprise generation in combating poverty, providing employment and increasing income, in order to address poverty at the grass-roots level, we need to explore the intersection of traditional business concepts with social venturing. This course aims to provide an understanding of social entrepreneurship that will help us put theory into practice in a meaningful way.

This course will examine entrepreneurship and enterprise generation as a key foundation of the development of both economic and social capital, as well as individual and community empowerment. Its main emphasis will be the exploration of entrepreneurship with an imperative to drive social change and build sustainable ventures. Its focus will be on designing enterprises for the base of the economic pyramid in the context of disadvantaged communities. We will participate in the unfolding dialogue about what constitutes a “social entrepreneur”, develop an understanding of the power of “disruptive innovation”, and study success stories from around the world, thereby gaining valuable insights into how to develop our own enterprises.

This course will require critical thinking, be highly interactive, and students will share their experiences, ideas, insights and challenges. Participants will be able to apply the learning from this course to their own start-ups and field projects.

Instructor:

Vinod Parekh

Social Entrepreneur, Proprietor of Human Development Services, Consultant Trainer and Mentor of several companies, visiting and online faculty at Colorado State University, Independent Director Man Diesel and Turbo India, World traveler.

I began my career in Sales and Marketing and then went on to be with BBC UK and trained as a Broadcaster before I discovered my passion for people development. I continue to be a student of Personal, Organisational and Community Transformation. Education: Organisational Development (OD) Chicago USA, Psychology Major: University of Nagpur, India. Marketing Management at NTC, Calcutta, India. Early Career: Radio and Television Broadcasting, BBC, London, Glasgow, Director Community Development Projects of the Institute of Cultural Affairs International, Chicago, USA an affiliate of the UN.

Current Responsibilities:
• Director-Human Development Services & Human Development Consultants and Trainers-A management consultancy- leadership training and development enterprise which specializes in conducting management alignment, team building, personal and organizational effectiveness enhancement programs for public, private , academic and voluntary sectors.
• Chairman-Unnati Enterprises – A Socio-Economic Enterprise dedicated to empowering rurban communities particularly youth;
• Mentor -Teaching Learning Community of Small & Medium Scale entrepreneurs;
• Visiting Faculty at: Maharashtra Police Academy, India International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), Colorado State University ,USA; Several Management Colleges and Institutes including Bharati Vidyapeet Institute for Management studies and Research, Moonje Mgt Institute, Mahatma Gandhi Management Institutes (MBA program) of the University of Pune, India Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai and Tuljapur;
•Independent Director- MAN Diesel Turbo

Previous Positions:
• Marketing Director-Communication Services, Hyderabad, India.
• Consultant / Trainer- Institute of Cultural Affairs-International, Chicago USA.
• Director Community and Village Development Projects, Maharashtra-India
• Project Director-Community Development Programme, Lusaka, Zambia.

Areas of Expertise:
•Designing and facilitating needs based training and development programmes aimed towards personal, organizational/community transformation using the Technology of Participative Management (ToP)
•Bridging intercultural gaps.

Passion: Traveling, interacting with people.

My MISSION – To equip individuals, communities and organizations (for and not for profit) with practical mindset change techniques and soft skills tools towards enhancing their overall effectiveness. My VISION – Personal and organizational/community transformation.


APPROACHES TO COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
January 13 – February 17, 2017 January 9, 2017 Open
April 21 – May 26, 2017 April 18, 2017 Open

Course Description

Explore both the structure and practice of community development around the world.  Engage in a critical analysis of different approaches to community development, their historical development and underlying assumptions.  Gain an understanding of the structural and practical issues that promote or detract from the goal of community empowerment.

Instructor:

David Bartecchi, M.A.

Dave received his M.A. in Cultural Anthropology from Colorado State University and has worked with Village Earth since 1998.  He is now the executive director of Village Earth.  Since 2000 he has been working with grassroots groups on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to recover lands for community-based bison restoration. He has also worked with the indigenous groups in Peru and Ecuador and trained and consulted on community-based development projects in in Azerbaijan, Armenia, India as well as with Native American tribes in California and Oklahoma.  He has been an instrumental part of several research projects with CSU’s Department of Anthropology including a 6 year longitudinal study of the informal economy on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota funded by the National Science Foundation, a survey of farmers and ranchers participating in the National Conservation Reserve Program conducted by CSU’s Natural Resource Ecology Lab and funded by the USDA, and community-based censuses on the Rosebud and Pine Ridge Reservations in South Dakota. Dave teaches online courses in Approaches to Community Development, Community Mobilization, and Community-based Mapping.


COMMUNITY-BASED FOOD SYSTEMS

Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
January 13 – February 17, 2017 January 9, 2017 Open

The cultivation, preparation, distribution, and consumption of food are practices that shape how we organize ourselves socially, economically and politically. Control over food is central to the sustainability and self-determination of communities. In this seminar, you will learn about different approaches to building community-based food systems and movements for food justice around the world. Together, we will evaluate various strategies for protecting community food resources and rebuilding local food economies, as well as the factors that threaten these efforts. With special consideration for marginalized communities in the global North and South, students will develop a conceptual toolkit and set of resources to help them assess the limitations and possibilities of their own community’s food system.

Instructors:

This course is facilitated by the International Agroecology Action Network (IAEAN) a consultancy group composed of ultra-motivated scientists willing to work hard to change the world. Although we are all agroecologists, we combine our diverse backgrounds and skills in order to dynamically implement sustainable and effective projects. Our pool of available consultants offer a wide range of skills and competences. We seek to improve society through our actions and research and we believe that both grassroots and top-down approaches are necessary to drive systemic change. Our members are currently involved in international organizations, private companies, development associations and in academic spheres.

Appropriate Technology Library Holiday Sale! Over 1,050 of self-reliance/DIY books on USB

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2016 Holiday Fundraising Campaign to Support Village Earth’s Global Affiliates

2016holidaycampaign

Olimometer 2.52

 Global Affiliate NameGeographic FocusAbout 
Facebook-Vert-LogoVillage Earth Area of Most NeedGlobalLet Village Earth decide how best to allocate your donation.
AmahoroAmahoro ProjectBurundiAmahoro project is a collaboration betweeen Colorado State University and Ngozi University in Burundi (UNG) to establish UNG as a ongoing site and dissemination center for research in sustainable peace and development.
CRDTCambodia Rural Development Team Northeast CambodiaWorks to sustainably improve food security, incomes, and living standards of subsistence rural communities in support of environmental conservation throughout Cambodia.
Earth TipiEarth TipiPine Ridge Reservation, SDWorks to sustainably improve food security, incomes, and living standards of subsistence rural communities in support of environmental conservation throughout Cambodia.
Eco_VEco-Friendly VolunteersSri LankaECO-V is a voluntary organization engaged in environmental conservation in Sri Lanka. ECO-V has a network of 400 volunteers throughout Sri Lanka who contribute to research and community work to support conservation of the environment.
EYCEmpowering Youth CambodiaPnom Penh, CambodiaEYC is a organization working to improve the lives of young people and their families. Our vision is to see youth empowered with skills & confidence to be leaders who actively develop themselves, their families and community.
FOFCODForum for Community Change and DevelopmentSouth SudanFOFCOD envisions a new generation of productive and self-reliant south Sudanese who can ably participate in community development programs to meet their needs and those of other disadvantaged groups.
GOLDGrowing Liberia Democracy (GOLD)LiberiaGOLD promotes poverty reduction as well as democratic & high quality governance by empowering local communities to effectively engage their law makers as to make policy decisions favorable for Liberians and to be fully transparent.
ICA_NEPAlInstitute of Cultural Affairs (Nepal)NepalICA’s mission is to promote social innovation through participation and community building. We do this throughout the country through training, facilitation & development activities.  
Human-and-Hope-Association-500x500Human and Hope AssociationSiem Reap, CambodiaHuman and Hope Association works to empower Cambodians to create sustainable futures for themselves through projects focused on education, vocational training and community support.
JalambaJalamba Nursery School ProjectThe GambiaThe goal of the of the Association is to empower youths, children and vulnerable families through education. The project has government support as a new school  which will serve ages of one through six. 
JenzeraJenzeraColombiaSupports community processes so that people can freely decide on their social, political and economic lives by defending their territories, empowering their own governments and developing a self-managed economies.
KnifeChiefKnife Chief Buffalo NationPine Ridge Reservation, SDThe Knife Chief Buffalo Nation, a grassroots project on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, works to reclaim 1800 acres of ancestral lands for restoring buffalo, and Lakota culture and lifeways.
LBCCLakota Buffalo Caretakers CooperativePine Ridge Reservation, SDThe Lakota Buffalo Caretakers Cooperative (LBCC) is a 100% Native American owned and operated cooperative association on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Its membership is made up of small family buffalo caretakers who respect the buffalo and the land. Members of the LBCC are committed to the restoration of the northern plains ecology, self-sufficiency and strengthening the sovereignty and self-determination of the Oglala Lakota Nation and all indigenous peoples.
LLRPLakota Lands Recovery ProjectSouth Dakota ReservationsThe LLRP works to reclaim and consolidate tribal lands and access the resources needed for the Lakota people to live on, protect, and utilize it — promoting self-determination and sovereignty.
MalocaMalocaAmazon BasinWorks with Indigenous Peoples living in the Amazon Basin. It works directly with Indigenous leaders to raise awareness about the needs of their communities and find means to establish self-sustaining strategies to address their needs.
TasunkeWakanTasunke WakanPine Ridge Reservation, SDOur primary goal is to develop and implement Lakol Wicohan (Lakota life ways and laws, which includes language, values, beliefs, ceremonies and laws of the Lakota people) within the Oyate (Community).
TRCDATitukuke RCDAPetuake, ZambiaTRCDA is devoted to to uplifting livelihoods, reducing illiteracy, poverty and HIV/AIDS Health problems among the communities in Petauke, Zambia

VE Affiliate, ICA Nepal Promotes Hygienic and Taboo-free Menstruation

 
As normal as menstruation cycle is among women, hiding the issue in the name of shame or sin is equally normal in Nepalese rural community. Considered as a major taboo, women are forbidden to discuss about it publicly especially among the presence of male and undergo various restrictions in touching different places. The sense of impurity and shamefulness is so deeply subsisted in people that have kept women away from basic awareness about menstrual hygiene. Women are still using cloth pieces during the menstrual period being prone to infections and not being able to put their views about menstruation openly. This has not only subordinated rural women in present time but has bounded them from not enjoying their reproductive rights properly.
 
ICA Nepal in the realization of the high time for menstrual awareness, has taken a step forward by training the local women to produce sanitary napkins on their own. Total 10 women were trained on producing the local cost sanitary napkins on August 2016. The training led ahead to start their own micro enterprise where women will be handling the production and sales of the napkins. This is a highly remarkable steps of ICA Nepal towards addressing one of the major women health issue and promoting menstrual hygiene as well as empowering women economically and encouraging local entrepreneurship.
 
Following the training of production of sanitary napkins, the five days long promotion, sales and marketing training was also provided for 25 more women from this 17th-21st November, 2016. The training focused on teaching various aspects of marketing to the women group, on developing marketing strategies and promoting their products to local area. The training resulted being very effective which enhanced the participant’s confidence and knowledge on their product.
 
The major point we want to highlight here is that this small initiation is not only focused on providing the income generation platform to the women but on bringing the bigger change in society. The proper promotion of sanitary napkins will ensure the change in practice of using hygienic products, increased awareness on local and individual level about menstrual hygiene and reduce the tendency of oppressing menstruation talks. The training period showed itself how women can open her mind if the male members help to create a comfortable environment to discuss these issues. Women can come out of their boundaries and take the lead to create better change in the society.
 
ICA Nepal thus hopes to empower women to bring the healthy change in this traditionally misleading practice. We vision for the day where women will free themselves from the tag of impurities during menstruation and be responsible towards her menstrual and reproductive health. ICA Nepal will be expanding its approaches in other innovative ways to reach more rural communities for promotion of menstrual hygiene in coming future as well in which we hope we will have all of your support.
 
Follow ICA Nepal on: 
 
Blog: www,icanepal.blogspot,com 

VE Affiliate, Human and Hope Association: Providing Education to Cambodian Kids

The marginalized Cambodian kids in rural area have less opportunities to start school at the age of six, which is the standard in Cambodia. Due to lateness at school, some kids are not ready to start yet and learn very slowly. Another thing, with the carelessness of teachers at public school, most kids copy bad behavior from their surrounding environment which affects their future learning and behavior.

To get them to start school early is the best way to solve the above issues. Human and Hope Association located in Siem Reap, Cambodia has started this program since 2013 with 10 students graduating each year.  It is one of their most successful programs.

The five years old marginalized kids will be attended this program for a year, then they are enrolled in grade one at public school. According to the curriculum: Monday – Thursday, they study Khmer alphabet, do coloring, do arts and crafts, play with toys, do some fun activities in our study area and brush their teeth daily. On Friday, they learn living values, watch movie, and pick up trash inside HHA.

Here is one of a successful story of our kid after attended our program:

“Tola came with his mother to enroll in our preschool class, while we were recruiting our new preschool class for 2015-2016. A shy and like crying boy, who was five-year old and came from a very poor family.  At first, he was very naughty and hot-tempered and he rarely play with others. However, after joining with us for nearly one year, he remarkably grew into confident, sociable, and very eager to learn. He is now has enrolled in grade one at public school and continue studying Khmer and English with us.

Tola’s mother once said, “My son has learned many hours at home. When he got sick, he didn’t want to miss the class until I strongly encouraged him. Moreover, his behavior has changed a lot as he respects me, his father, and his classmates.”

It costs $120USD to place one marginalised kid in a year-long preschool program at Human and Hope Association.

Human and Hope Association needs your support to fund 10 kids for 2017, so please make a tax deductible donation today! https://www.villageearth.org/global-affiliates/human-and-hope-association

Best,
San Thai

Director

Human and Hope Association

Siem Reap, Cambodia

Donate: https://www.humanandhopeassociation.org/donate/

Purchase our handicrafts: http://hopehandicrafts.com

50% Match #GivingTuesday on Donations to Village Earth and Global Affiliates

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November 29th is #GivingTuesday and it will be the best day of the year to support Village Earth and our Global Affiliates. Globalgiving.org will be matching all donations 50% up to $1000! That means If you donate $1000 Globalgiving.org will add another $500!!! BUT, funds will run out fast so to ensure your donation is matched you need to donate as early as possible Tuesday (starting at midnight).

Use the link below automatically add this event to your calendar

View Eligible Projects

https://www.globalgiving.org/donate/9388/village-earth/

Amahoro Project: Infuse Peace Building Content with an Emphasis on Critical and Creative Thinking for the University of Ngozi, local communities and schools in Burundi, East Africa and Beyond

 

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“Amahoro” is the Kirundi word for peace. Founded in 1999 with a commitment to peace and reconciliation, its University of Ngozi (UNG) is uniquely situated to be a laboratory for peace-building and sustainable development and the Amahoro Project hopes to help lead the way. We recognize that economic development will suffer if violence continues and that peace will be a casualty if communities remain mired in poverty. Burundi is one of the poorest countries in the world, emerging from colonization and forty years of violence. Recent conflicts currently threaten the last eight years of stability but conditions in the region of Ngozi have remained peaceful for many years and that is one of the principle reasons why we are working there. Those committed to this project believe that sustainable development must wed with restorative educational innovations to prepare new leaders to heal and foster civil society as basic infrastructure needs are addressed. In all our endeavors, we propose to use locally generated and regionally applicable case- and project-based learning along with ideas and skills for peace building (i.e.,  improved communication, cooperation, conflict resolution and more) to transform surface or memorized learning into a greater emphasis on critical and creative thinking. Over the course of this project, the UNG will be established as a viable center for research and development in sustainable peace and development. With this grant, those at the UNG can help Burundi forge (1) a recovery and rebirth of spirit, (2) reconcile wounds, differences, rivalries, prejudices, and hatreds, (3) resolve to understand the truth of the past, fix the present, and prepare for a better future; and (4) reinforce the resilience needed to rebuild an impoverished, post-colonial nation.

 

Benefits

There are currently some 1,700 students at the University of Ngozi. Our peace-building efforts will impact each of these students in every class they take throughout their college careers. Each new class of 400+ will enjoy a similar duel training in disciplinary case-based, problem-based, and project-based learning infused with peace building skills of improved communication, cooperation, conflict resolution, mediation and more. When they graduate, these students will move into various communities across this nation of approximately eleven million as well as into neighboring nations of Rwanda and Uganda. Once available on various websites and translated from English into French and Kirundi, these materials will also be accessible to other colleges and universities in Burundi as well as school systems nationally. Eventually, these materials should prove useful to faculty and school leaders around the world, especially those in areas emerging from conflict.

 

Responsibilities

Staff members and instructors at the University of Ngozi will draw from the four years of interviews, surveys, research and development that created a foundation for this work on sustainable peace and development, e.g., Timpson, Ndura, &. Bangayimbaga (2015) Conflict, reconciliation, and peace education: Moving Burundi toward a sustainable future. (New York, NY: Routledge). Testing will follow the principles laid out in ongoing research and development for case study learning as described in several published sources, e.g., Timpson, W. and D. K. Holman, Eds. (2014) Controversial Case studies for teaching on sustainability, conflict, and diversity. (Madison, WI: Atwood); Timpson, W., E. Brantmeier, N. Kees, T. Cavanagh, C. McGlynn and E. Ndura-Ouédraogo (2009) 147 practical tips for teaching peace and reconciliation. (Madison, WI: Atwood).

 

Goals

The project’s goals of supporting sustainable peace and development recognizes that without peace there will not be the foundation needed for community, economic and environmental health as reflected in the most popular definitions of sustainability. Likewise, without healthy communities, a healthy economy and a healthy land base, both cultivated and natural, the potential for peace will be uncertain. Our emphasis on training university instructors and teachers in the skills of peace-building—i.e., effective communication, cooperation, critical and creative thinking—will then be spread throughout the curriculum and across levels and disciplines as we link these to an emphasis on case-based, problem-based, and project-based learning, e.g., Timpson & Holman, Eds. (2011), Case Studies of Classrooms and Communication: Integrating Diversity, Sustainability, Peace and Reconciliation (Madison, WI: Atwood) as well as Timpson’s (2002) book, Teaching and Learning Peace (Madison, WI: Atwood). Once these materials are trialed at the University of Ngozi, they will be mounted on the University’s website for others to access in Burundi, both in higher education and local schools, as well as in neighboring countries and others world-wide who are also emerging out of conflict.

 

Evaluation

Instructors from the University of Ngozi (UNG) will be trained in case-based, problem-based, and project-based learning that emphasizes critical and creative thinking, cooperation and communication, i.e., the skills of peace-building infused into subject matter content studies. These instructors, in turn, will evaluate the impact of these reforms on their own students. These instructors will then lead efforts to train colleagues on campuses and in schools across Burundi as well as in surrounding region who come to the conferences that are hosted by this project at UNG. Instructors in the area of computer sciences will take the lead in facilitating communication about access to project materials at a distance via the University’s website.

 

January, 2017: Organize professional development conferences for instructors at all levels and across all disciplines, beginning with those at the University of Ngozi.

  • A conference on case-based learning infused with peace-building content and skills will be organized at UNG and lead by Professor Timpson.
  • Feb.-May: Subsequent conferences on case-based learning infused with peace-building content and skills will be organized and lead by instructors from UNG for instructors at other campuses as well as teachers in the region and beyond.
  • Jan.-May: Recruit instructors at the University of Ngozi in the various disciplines who would complete a second graduate online offering in the communication skills needed to support effective instruction.

Maloca Working with Kamaiura of Brazil to Mitigate Impacts of Deforestation and Climate Change

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Maloca is working with the Kamaiura to enable them to build a new village. The existing Kamaiurávillage that counts almost 300 people will split and a few families will move a new village as a measure to reduce the stress on the environment around the current Kamaiurá village, thus ensuring maintenance of livelihoods for all Kamaiurá people.
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Extreme deforestation in Mato Grosso state produced changes in the Xingu’s micro climate in the past few years: the raining season changed; rains come very late or do not come at all, affecting manioc crops, water levels (fish numbers decrease) and drying the forest (which create fierce wild fires). Manioc crops that the Kamaiura planted died three times this year leaving the Kamaiurá people on the verge of famine, with little more than water to eat for days at a time. Because of extreme dryness of the air and vegetation, wild fires burned out of control this year, engulfing swaths of forest and savannah, killing animals, destroying their habitat for years to come and reducing even more the chance of future rains. All these factors put enormous stress on the environment where the Kamaiura live and are placing at risk the Kamaiura livelihoods.
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The Kamaiurá solution
The chief of the Kamaiurá, Kotok, is very concerned about the future of his people and he decided to act: he will split his Kamaiurá village in two and open a new village where he and a few families will move. The new village will be still on  Kamaiurá  territory, where his ancestors used to live a few generations ago.
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The proceeds of the fundraiser will help but tools that the Kamaiurá have asked for in order to speed up the process of building their village and ease the hard physical work they need to put. The new village will be built according to traditional Kamaiurá architecture.
Fundraiser link (also see attached photos):
Thank you,
Luminita