April Courses in the Online Certificate Program in Sustainable Community Development

TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Course Tuition:  $390
Continuing Education Units (CEU’s): 2
Duration:  5 weeks

 
Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
April 21 – May 26, 2017 April 17, 2017 Open

Course Overview

Explore how technology, both a blessing and curse, is critical for individuals and communities accessing and managing resources. Consider equitable distribution of its productive gains, environmental impacts, debt burdens, health consequences and impacts on the social and cultural fabric of a community.  Examine some of the practical and ethical challenges faced by communities and community workers in their efforts to develop or introduce new technologies to enhance human well-being. Discover important concepts and strategies for successful participatory technology development, emphasizing principles developed by thinkers such as Ghandi and E.F. Schumacker.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Outline the history and basic principles of appropriate technology.
  • Work with communities to analyze their situation, develop strategic directions, and generate appropriate technology packages.
  • Support community-based technology generation efforts by creating linkages to information and resources.

Instructor:

frankFrank Bergh, EIT, LEED-AP

Frank Bergh is a 2011 alumnus of the Certificate of Community-Based Development Program at Colorado State University and has collaborated with Village Earth in training workshops in Community Mobilization for Engineers Without Borders USA (EWB-USA). He is the VP of Grid Engineering at Sigora International, designing and implementing community-based renewable energy micro-utilities in frontier markets.

Frank has been an active member and leader within Engineers Without Borders USA since 2005, holding officer positions in at the local, regional, and national level. He is the former president of EWB-USA’s Great Lakes Region, former Chair of the Energy Standing Content Committee, and a former Board Member.

Frank has a B.S. in Electrical Engineering (2008) from Washington University in St. Louis. His professional and volunteer work has spanned 14 countries and 4 continents.  His career in the renewable energy industry has spanned wind energy, solar energy, and battery-based energy storage systems. He continues to advise several NGOs and startups on appropriate technology and participatory community development.


 

Building Climate Change Resilient Communities

Course Tuition: $390
Continuing Education Units (CEUs): 2
Duration: 5 Weeks

 
Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
April 21 – May 26, 2017 April 17, 2017 Open

“The environment and the economy are really both two sides of the same coin. You cannot sustain the economy if you don’t take care of the environment because we know that the resources that we use whether it is oil, energy, land … all of these are the basis in which development happens. And development is what we say generates a good economy and puts money in our pockets. If we cannot sustain the environment, we cannot sustain ourselves.”   — Wangari Maathai

Course Description
 
Local communities around the globe are already affected by climate change. People in least-developed and developing countries are among the most vulnerable ones, yet they have the least coping capacity. Climate change impacts are localized and diverse therefore, the response needs to be as diverse and adapted to the local situation.
 
This class will explore key concepts of resilience, vulnerability, adaptive capacity and social capital in the context of community exposure to climate change. We will engage in critical analysis of tools and methods for building resilience to climate change and will look at several case studies from around the world.
 
Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:
 
  • Understand the variety of issues and challenges faced by organizations, nations, local and indigenous communities related to climate change;
  • Understand mitigation and adaptation options in community resilience-building;
  •  Make informed decisions when working with communities to critically assess the impacts of climate change and build a resilience plan.

Instructor:

Luminita Cuna, M.S.

TedxLuminita Cuna has a Master of Science in Sustainable Development with focus on Environmental Management from the University of London/School of Oriental and African Studies. Her Master’s thesis researched the impact of conservation policies on protected areas in the Amazon and their effects on the indigenous people that live in these areas. Luminita worked for 10 years in Information Technology, including at the United Nations. She studied International Economics and French at Mount Holyoke College, where she earned her BA. Luminita holds a Graduate Certificate in Management of Information Systems and a Professional Certificate in Journalism, both from New York University and a Certificate of Community Development from Colorado State University.

 Luminita is the founder and director of Maloca (a Village Earth affiliate), a grassroots support organization that works with indigenous communities living in the Amazon basin. Luminita has been traveling extensively to the Amazon region to Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Colombia and Brazil and has been working with indigenous communities in the Amazon since 2006. She participated several times in the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in New York, and in June 2012 she attended the Kari-Oca II indigenous conference, part of Rio+20 – United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development.

 

COMMUNITY MOBILIZATION

Course Tuition:  $390
Continuing Education Units (CEU’s): 2
Duration: 5 weeks

 
Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
April 21 – May 26, 2017 April 17, 2017 Open

Course Description

Explore what turns a group of individuals into an organization or social movement.  Consider what structural, social, or  psychological barriers inhibit or prevent individuals and groups from getting involved and working together for change.  Examine the definition of community mobilization as both an initial and ongoing process central to any community and social change effort that seeks to build support and participation of individuals, groups, and institutions to work towards a common goal or vision. Learn from the theories and methods of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire, whose work has guided some of the most successful development and education programs around the globe, including the Orangi Pilot Project in Pakistan, The NAAM movement in Burkina Faso, and the Sarvodaya Shramadana Movement in Sri Lanka, among others.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify the role of community mobilization in the context of human rights-based approaches to community development.
  • Better outline the causes and psychological affects of poverty oppression.
  • Better communicate with individuals and communities to enhance trust and solidarity.
  • Assist communities to mobilize for collective action and cooperation.

Instructor:

David Bartecchi, M.A.

Dave received his M.A. in Cultural Anthropology from Colorado State University and has worked with Village Earth since 1998.  He is now the executive director of Village Earth.  Since 2000 he has been working with grassroots groups on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to recover lands for community-based bison restoration. He has also worked with the indigenous groups in Peru and Ecuador and trained and consulted on community-based development projects in in Azerbaijan, Armenia, India as well as with Native American tribes in California and Oklahoma.  He has been an instrumental part of several research projects with CSU’s Department of Anthropology including a 6 year longitudinal study of the informal economy on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota funded by the National Science Foundation, a survey of farmers and ranchers participating in the National Conservation Reserve Program conducted by CSU’s Natural Resource Ecology Lab and funded by the USDA, and community-based censuses on the Rosebud and Pine Ridge Reservations in South Dakota.

Dave teaches online courses in Approaches to Community Development, Community Mobilization, and Community-based Mapping.


 

APPROACHES TO COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Course Tuition:  $390
Duration: 5 Weeks
Continuing Education Units (CEUs): 2

 
Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
April 21 – May 26, 2017 April 17, 2017 Open

Course Description

Explore both the structure and practice of community development around the world.  Engage in a critical analysis of different approaches to community development, their historical development and underlying assumptions.  Gain an understanding of the structural and practical issues that promote or detract from the goal of community empowerment.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Outline  the historical development and underlying assumptions of different approaches to community development.
  • Identify the issues faced by the rapidly changing field of community development.
  • Distill key structures and practices for becoming more effective on the ground.

Instructor:

JohnStrawJohn Straw, M.Ed.

John Straw has an M.Ed. from the University of Illinois at Chicago, focused on social justice education, and his bachelors from the University of Michigan with a degree in Spanish and Education. John has spent five years working in Honduras and Guatemala on community-based health and development projects, and the past 15 years working with Concern America, an international development and refugee aid organization, based in southern California, with health, water, and income-generation projects in Latin America and Africa. He has been the Executive Director of Concern America since 2012.

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